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WEBINAR: The Health Effect - with Robb Wolf & Chris Kresser

Learn the keys to functional health - Aug 23 @ noon EST
Friday, August 4, 2017, 2:45 PM

The Health Effect webinar ad

Health is the purest form of wealth. If you don't have it, no amount of other riches you possess really matters.

And make no mistake, our health is under siege.

First by the aging process, of course. But increasingly, it's our culture (sedentary, isolated, stressful, indulgent), our food system (toxic calories that can be mass produced cheaply), and our health care system (which treats and profits off the symptoms of disease vs curing it) that conspire against our physical well-being and mental happiness.

The good news that each of us has personal agency in determining our destiny when it comes to our own health. The science underlying our understanding of wellness is accelerating rapidly, yielding an abundance of practical guidance for those looking to live longer, more active, happier lives. (Chris and I have reported our own successes following this guidance, which you can read more about here and here).

So, what specific steps should you consider taking in your own life, and how can you best incorporate these into your current lifestyle? To answer those questions, we're producing our first Peak Prosperity 'Insider' webinar, titled "The Health Effect", featuring two of the absolute top experts today in functional health: Robb Wolf and Chris Kresser.

Robb Wolf headshotRobb Wolf -  Robb is a former research biochemist, health expert, and author of the New York Times bestselling Wired To Eat. He has been a review editor for the Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism and Journal of Evolutionary Health; serves on the board of directors of Specialty Health medical clinic in Reno, Nevada, and is a consultant for the Naval Special Warfare Resiliency Program. Robb is also a former California State Powerlifting champion and holds the rank of blue belt in Brazilian jiu-jitsu. 

Chris Kresser headshotChris Kresser -  Chris is a globally recognized leader in the fields of ancestral health, Paleo nutrition, and functional and integrative medicine. He is the creator of ChrisKresser.com, one of the top 25 natural health sites in the world, and the author of several New York Times best sellers, as well as his newest book, Unconventional Medicine. Chris was recently named by Greatist.com as one of the 100 most influential people in health and fitness, along with Michelle Obama, Michael Pollan, Dr. Andrew Weil, Tim Ferriss, Mark Sisson and...Robb Wolf.

Both Robb and Chris will share their latest insights on the key, actionable behaviors that drive physical and mental health (both have recently released new books on the topic). And given the highly-interactive nature of our new webinar platform, both will take ample time to answer questions from the audience.

The event itself will take place on Wednesday, August 23 at noon EST/9am PST. It will last approximately an hour and a half.

The price to participate in this webinar is $25, unless you are an enrolled member of PeakProsperity.com (i.e. paying subscriber with access to our 'Insider' content). In that case, it's FREE

To register for this Insider webinar, click the big blue button below -- though given that a month's subscription to PeakProsperity.com is only $30, you may want to give serious consideration to enrolling instead. It's only $5 more, and gives you access to the webinar PLUS all of the premium analysis, reports, podcasts, alerts and events that PeakProsperity.com has to offer. That's a pretty screaming value for an additional five bucks.

Post-Webinar Playback

A video recording of the webinar will be made available to participants after the webinar is over. That means there's no reason to worry if you can't make the live event, or need to skip out on parts of it due to meetings or other obligations. You'll be able to re-watch the webinar as much as you like.

So if this interests you, register now by clicking the big blue button below.

If these initial webinars we're producing continue being received successfully, that will enable us to produce more of these 'gathering of great thinkers' for you in the future. We have great hopes for this new webinar platform, but how much we use it in the future will be a direct function of how many people like and attend these live events. So if you want more of these, please participate!

And if there are other speakers you'd particularly like to see in a future webinar, please let us know by contacting us here.

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16 Comments

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 146
ironic

Its ironic that Michael Pollan is mentioned. The last time I checked, he's a bit of a critic of the Paleo Diet. More accurately, he thinks they've taken a distorted template of Paleo life and laid it over the modern food system. The animals these folks were eating (when they could find and catch them) were nothing like the ones we eat today. Definitely not "raised" and "fed" the same, definitely much leaner, definitely more diverse, just like the Paleo. All because because everything was in "tough" competition. It makes sense that in an "Ice Age" world, when you caught a dense form of calories, you gorged on it storing up everything you could like a bloated chipmunk. But day to day reality was something else.

If I'm not mistaken, Pollan also thinks the assumed proportions are off as well. He believes (and I lean toward this theory) that humans, like humans do, ate a wide variety of things that didn't kill them and kept them going and this diversity was geographically diverse and dependent. Pollan also thinks that what we take for "bread" is so less nutritious and so less diverse than it used to be  ...just like the "bread" in our wallets.

I confess I'm biased because I lean heavily toward a plant based diet. I think it took me a while to figure out what works best for my individual system. I think it was Chris himself who pointed out to guest speakers that one of the best things he ever did was figure out his own specific "food allergies."  I think food allergies are just a point in a potentially wide spectrum. This spectrum is now exponentially more complex thanks to the Monsanto overlords. These can be subtle and difficult to detect but I believe they are also a function of the individual.

 

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 59
Robb is not nearly as

Robb is not nearly as hardline about strict paleo as he and a lot of others were 5+ years ago. I think he's pretty open minded and appreciative of nuance. 

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 59
And very cognizant of and

And very cognizant of and interested in individual variability. 

cowtown2011's picture
cowtown2011
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2011
Posts: 29
How about another view

Nicely written comment dcm. It would be great if Peakprosperity.com would also interviews other "experts" in this space. I understand why people gravitate to Paleo but the science just isn't there to support it as a healthy diet in today's world. Who doesnt love highly calorie dence food like animal products. Also, not all studies are created equal just like the ones which state that eggs can lower cholestoral. Would be great to see an interview with Dr. Michael Gregor M.D. Or other practising physicians. I have a hard time taking health advice from those who earn their living from selling books, etc and not practising medicine on other people.

ccwesq's picture
ccwesq
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 12 2013
Posts: 50
I was Paleo

for several years and then a month ago my wife and I went completely plant based.  I felt fine before but feel even better now.  There's just something about it I enjoy so it could just be psychological, I guess.  We'll see how the blood work looks at the next checkup.

 

Casey

Adam Taggart's picture
Adam Taggart
Status: Peak Prosperity Co-founder (Offline)
Joined: May 26 2009
Posts: 2658
Not A Paleo-Fest

A few points:

While Robb and Chris are definitely Paleo experts, this webinar isn't intended as a Paleo-fest. Both are very science-based data-driven researchers, and all topics/approaches are on the table as long as there's empirical evidence to support them.

Given the interest here, we will definitely make the benefits & challenges of a plant-based diet one of the focuses of the webinar. It's a topic both are asked to address frequently.

That's one of the nice advantages of these webinars: not only hearing from top experts, but being able to ask them directly the questions you care about most.

So, for those with burning questions, please prepare to put them to Chris & Robb.

Pandabonium's picture
Pandabonium
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 30 2008
Posts: 85
How about another view

As you may know, cowtown2011, Dr. Greger will have a special on PBS at 8 PM EDT on the 8th of August.

That's 9 AM here in Japan so I will definitely be watching.  It will be streamed on his website nutritionfacts.org

I was never a big meat eater myself, but did eat seafood and some dairy most of my life until I had a hemorrhagic stroke in 2012 at age 61!  I faced many problems leading up to that which I believe came about by following the medical advice of doctors poorly trained in nutrition.   Lucky for me I didn't suffer permanent problems from that and soon after walking out of hospital watched the movie "Forks Over Knives".   I've been eating whole food, plant based ever since with no salt, oil, or sugar added - I also stopped drinking any alcohol (speaking of poorly done studies).    I dropped 40 lbs of fat in six months and my blood work is great, letting me avoid the meds that I do not want to have to take for the rest of my life, such as statins or hypertension meds.   Now I grow my own leafy greens, root vegetables, and some fruit and gift the extras to local family and neighbors who all reciprocate.   

For many excellent one hour talks on this topic, visit the Vegetarian Society of Hawaii's YouTube channel vshvideo. 

Time to call my wife in for lunch.  Cheers.

 

  

 

 

Carl's picture
Carl
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 17 2008
Posts: 14
Transcript?

Adam,

Will a transcript of the webinar be posted?

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 59
Chris Kresser does practice

Chris Kresser does practice medicine on other people--he's been operating a clinic with a large number of patients for years. He also posts regularly about the science on his web site and talks about it on his Revolution Health Radio podcast. I would at least give him a look/listen.

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 146
Chris does practice

Maybe its the trial lawyer in me, but I'm always a little skeptical of the self professed "expert witness." I am a strong critic of current corporate medicine and although  l knew a bit about the paleo diet, I didn't know much about Kresser. So I did what I always do and put in "criticism" and his name in the search engines. It brought back some pretty interesting stuff including plenty of personal interaction experiences with his "medicine practice.". Like any hotel, you can almost always find some negative review(s) in cyberland but its the totality of cyberland that helps clarify the picture.

darcieg76's picture
darcieg76
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 3 2016
Posts: 59
Well, you can always help

Well, you can always help form your own opinion by giving it a listen/watch, and for free, apparently, if you're a paid member. :)

lambertad's picture
lambertad
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 31 2013
Posts: 130
evidence for assertions, please

"I understand why people gravitate to Paleo but the science just isn't there to support it as a healthy diet in today's world."

One would assume people do research before they make such assertions. A 5 minute pubmed.gov search turns up dozens upon dozens of articles. Sorting that information by controlled trials cuts out alot of the garbage. Epidemiological studies can provide a lot of insight, but when looking for specific outcomes it's not that helpful. If we want direct comparisons we need controlled trials. Here's a link to the abstract of an article where they compare the standard American Diabetes Association Diet to the Paleo diet for only 14 days. Surprise, the Paleo diet is better! That's actual evidence. 

Sure you can argue that these people are chronically ill already and any small change to their diet is probably for the best, but that's another rabbit hole to go down. 

There are lots of problems with diet studies to include - dietary recall is notoriously poor information, metabolic ward studies where patients are confined to a facility and only fed certain foods are expensive and cannot be conducted for long periods of time (years to decades), and there are more. However, if you look at cultures that did not/do not consume westernized foods, they are mostly devoid of chronic western diseases - hypertension, hyperlipidemia, coronary artery disease, diabetes, etc. 

Staffan Lindeberg, a researcher and anthropologist has a great book with TONS of epidemiological evidence that hunterer gatherer type diets are better than westernized diets. A simple search on amazon would provide additional evidence - 

As I understand it the paleo diet consists of:

1. A wide range of vegetables on a seasonal basis to provide variety and that are ideally produced locally.

2. Fruits in season and local - not watermelons in march or peaches in May in Idaho. 

3. Lean meats that are unprocessed/minimally processed from free-range/grass fed sources, with a preference for wild game that approaches the N3-N6 ratio our evolutionary past. 

4. Nuts and seeds, unprocessed 

5. Healthy fats - coconut oil, etc. 

6. Extremely minimal natural sugar - honey, etc. 

7. No grains, legumes, dairy, sugars, sweeteners, etc. If it has an ingredients list, it's off the table basically. 

Lastly, if you think there isn't evidence for this stuff, you're just not looking. For Pete's sake, they now have the technology to analyze the fossilized plaque on the teeth from the paleo past to see what they ate. 

Lastly, here is a picture of Aborigine hunter-gatherers in Australia. I can't find the exact source info for the picture, but I used it in a presentation once and the gentleman in the middle was in his 70s. Yes, physical activity has a lot to do with it, but so does diet. 

 

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 146
Australian Supermen

As you indicate, its really hard to compare the pale "guys" in the cubicle against the "guys" in the picture. "Free Range" takes on a whole new meaning. Tons of vitamin D. Tons of variables. Many nutritionists and some anthropologists balk at the paleo absolutes on grains and legumes. Honey also has some amazing properties which we are still trying to understand. In fact the "absolutes" might appear inconsistent with its other principles. As the article below points out, like economies, perhaps nature (both external and internal) is an imperfect balance and harmony game of lots and lots of things. Nutrition is a function (or result) of the wide diversity of nature (including individual people and peoples). Like other things in nature, some edible plants may produce some potential negative results at certain levels but also provide incredible sources of positive intake at others. The paleo vs mediterranean vs vegan vs dick cheney debate might be missing the "absolute" point.

https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2016/07/5-questions-randall-stafford-advocates-a-plant-based-diet.html 

 

on second thought, we can check Dick Cheney off

McAW3SOM3's picture
McAW3SOM3
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 6 2017
Posts: 1
Paleo is always adapting

What I've enjoyed most from these guys is they are open minded. They go where the research takes them. Also not everyone is created equally so what works for you may not work for me. There is a bit of an extremism that may paint the broad approach of paleo in a bad light, and I think they do a great job in explaining how to find what fits your personal needs. Either way, if you're following a westernized diet, and you start a paleo method, you're on the right track.

dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 146
dcm's picture
dcm
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 14 2009
Posts: 146
To Kresser's Credit

...it looks like he, himself has backed off the bean war

https://chriskresser.com/are-legumes-paleo/

Another factor discussed in good documentaries like "Food Matters" is the overall AMOUNT of protein actually needed for human beings and the efficiency and side effects of their delivery systems - meat vs veg. There are significant differences.  

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