Peak Prosperity

Shale Oil - Crash Course Chapter 21

Expensive. Over-hyped. And short-lived.
Friday, November 14, 2014, 6:38 PM

If you've watch the previous video chapter on Peak Cheap Oil, you may be wondering how any of that could be still be true given all the positive recent stories about shale oil and shale gas , many of which have proclaimed that “Peak Oil is dead”.

The only problem with this story is that it is misleading in some very important ways. And entirely false in others. » Read more


Peak Prosperity

Energy Economics - Crash Course Chapter 19

THE reason why growth will be more scarce in the future
Friday, October 24, 2014, 6:45 PM

The central point to this latest video is this: as we’ve shown in previous chapters of the Crash Course, our global economy depends on continual growth to function. And not just any kind of growth; but exponential growth.

But in order to grow, it must receive an ever-increasing input supply of affordable energy and resources from the natural world. What I’m about to show you is a preponderance of data that indicates those inputs will just not be there in the volumes needed to supply the growth that the world economy is counting on. » Read more


This chapter of the new Crash Course series has not yet been made available to the public.

Each week over the rest of 2014, in sequential order, a new chapter will be made publicly available (we've currently published up to Chapter 20)


If you don't want to wait, you can:

  • Enroll today to watch this new chapter right now (as well as all the other chapters of the new Crash Course)

Get Ready for Rising Commodity Prices

Driven by hot money seeking a low-risk haven
Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 8:27 PM

The human mind seeks a narrative explanation of events, a story that makes sense of the swirl of life’s interactions.

The simpler the story, the easier it is to understand. Thus the simple stories are the most attractive to us.

But conspiracies and power groups do not always provide comprehensive explanations for what we observe. » Read more


Middle Class? Here's What's Destroying Your Future

Why it's harder than ever to build wealth
Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 7:36 PM

According to the conventional account, the Great American Middle Class has been eroded by rising energy costs, globalization, and the declining purchasing power of the U.S. dollar in the four decades since 1973. While these trends have certainly undermined middle-class wealth and income, there are five other less politically acceptable dynamics at work:

  1. The divergence of State/private vested interests and the interests of the middle class
  2. The emergence of financialization as the key driver of profits and political power
  3. The neofeudal “colonization” of the “home market” by ascendant financial Elites
  4. The increasing burden of indirect “taxes” as productive enterprises and people involuntarily subsidize unproductive, parasitic, corrupt, but politically dominant vested interests
  5. The emergence of crony capitalism as the lowest-risk, highest-profit business model in the U.S. economy

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Nun kommen wir genau auf das Thema zu sprechen , das mein Investitions- und Kaufverhalten prägt. Ich nenne es Energiehaushalten.

Als man begann Erdöl für industrielle Zwecke zu nutzen, stand die Weltbevölkerung bei 1.5 Milliarden Menschen und Segelschiffe durchpflügten die Gewässer neben den mit Kohle betriebenen Dampfschiffen. Seither hat sich die Weltbevölkerung mehr als vervierfacht, die Weltwirtschaft ist um das zwanzigfache gewachsen und der Energieverbrauch um mehr als das vierzigfache.

Uns allen sind die gewaltigen Nutzeffekte bestens bekannt, die mit dieser explosiven Befreiung menschlicher Leistungsfähigkeit verbunden sind. Um die Fortsetzung dieses anhaltenden Überflusses richtig würdigen zu können, müssen wir die Rolle der Energie bei der Formung unserer Gesellschaft verstehen. 


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In the next section, we will discuss the intersection between Energy and the Economy, and I will make the point that it was no accident that our exponential, debt-based money system grew up at precisely the same moment that a new source of high quality energy was discovered that proved capable of increasing exponentially right alongside it.

Now we embark on the precise line of thinking that completely dominates my investing and purchasing habits. I call it energy economics.

With sufficient surplus energy, humans can construct remarkably complex creations in short order. Social complexity relies on surplus energy. Societies that unwillingly lose complexity are notoriously unpleasant places to live. Given this, shouldn’t we pay close attention to how much surplus energy we’ve got and where it comes from?