What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

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SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

PlicketyCat wrote:

Ok - I'll chime in since I'm the "organizer" in the family :)  

Sam: Important documents and keepsakes, we keep a small totable file box with a handle (like this one, but ours has a lock) that contains: birth certificate, marriage license, G's naturalization certificate, passports, social security cards, deeds, last will & living will, firearms proof of ownership, vehicle titles & insurance cards, pet records (immunization & health certificate), and a list of physical assets. We also have a thin binder in there which contains I.C.E. data; a list of medical conditions, allergies, medications & healthcare contact information;  a list of all financial assets (including phone#, acct#, PW, etc); and our regular address book. 

In case of a fire or other immediate evac situation, it's an easy grab-n-go. We also have all this information scanned as PDF files on a USB pen drive in each of our BOBs just in case... although many agencies will NOT accept anything other than a "stamped" original or certified copy.

Aaron: Gungnir & I will post pics and an updated list once we're done reassembling and restocking our BOBs for true wilderness situation. Might be a few days since our sleep system is at the dry cleaners. 

Basically, we have a similar system to yours, with an additional layer in there. "Immediate" is stuff that is always on our bodies -- est. 1-3 days. "Short term" is kept in a small knapsack and contains things that would fit in our belt, vest & jacket -- est. 3-5 days. Our "medium" survival kit is in a stuff-sack inside our "long-term" survival kit, but it can be easily removed and added to our "short term" knapsack (once we've redistributed) as well -- est. 5-10 days. Long term -- we could essentially live on "forever".  Basically, short, medium and long are a nesting system.

Yes, we do travel heavy, but only if we're running with our "long" kit. Long kit runs about 65 lbs (3 + 2 liters of water). Medium kit runs closer to 40 lbs (3 liters of water). Short is about 20 lbs (2 liters of water) distributed all over the body. Immediate is about 10 lbs... mostly tools, weapons & ammo (and 1 liter of water)

Plickety: I'm duly impressed with your totable file box - mind you, I've been duly impressed by you two for some time now! In fact, you've mentioned something that I hadn't thought about doing - which is why I really like these exchanges 'cause I'm always learning new good stuff. The "PDF files on a USB pen drive in each of our BOBs just in case..." is an excellent idea. Redundant electronic backup - so obvious, yet so smart! I'll have to start scanning tomorrow. As for only wanting originals, well - if TSHTF and that's all you have, so be it. They'll just have to accept it.

I'm also duly impressed with the layered kits that Aaron and you guys have put together. Makes my stuff look like small potatoes! Another good learning session. Thank you for sharing and I look forward to the pic's. 

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Of course, that pen drive will be toast if there is an EMP...  but in that case, it won't matter if you lose the paper and you lose the backup electronic copies, I think the world will be in too much trouble to care LOL.  Just make sure the docs are in PDF, JPG or GIF format as those are the only ones that will reliably open on either a PC (Unix, Linux, Windows) or Mac.

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

If there's an EMP, I won't be worrying about my thumb drives!

I gotta ask...you guys have radiation detector and dosimeters and KI?

I do ..I live 10 miles from a reactor.

SG

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Nope no detectors, or Dosimeters (which I find kind of funny anyway, oh look it's red I'm dead).

We do have KI though, and dosing with that should start immediately anyway, regardless of whether you've got, suspected to have, or not had exposure to any radioactivity post strike.

Where we are going to be has prevailing westerlies, Fairbanks is about 100 miles from us (there is no current nuclear weapon with enough destructive force to fry us where we are) and behind two mountains, Anchorage is south of us by about 130 miles, and the Highest mountain in North America is between us and it. there are no other viable tactical or strategic targets that would be high probability for a nuclear strike. Fallout will fall east of Fairbanks predominantly, or East of Anchorage. There's nothing of note between us and the Bering sea. North there is Prudhoe, but that's behind the Brooks range. So we're pretty much Ok on that front too, of course it might screw up the weather... But I can deal with more cold, if I'm not coughing up blood and bleeding from every orifice.

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nickbert
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

SamLinder wrote:

nickbert,

That's very good thinking re the safe. I'm also doubly impressed at the way you actually did a real run-through to see how fast you could accomplish the bug-out. Even I haven't done that yet! Kudos to you - I'm sure you'll do real fine in an emergency. Two thumbs up!

Sam,

Well thanks, but until I do a practice-drill with wife and child it doesn't count for much yet

Aaron,

Will provide pictures as soon as we finish the move.  Plus, some of Gungnir's comments made me realize my bags are packed with Colorado Front Range winters in mind and NOT Alaska winters... I should have remedied that already .  As soon as we finish the move up I will have to re-pack with more appropriate gear!

- Nickbert

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A. M.
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Cape,

The Kearny Fallout Meter can be assembled impromtu.
I've got the schematics in my kit.

Nickbert,

Sounds good!

Plickety/Gungnir,

Very cool - you two have your stuff together! The Dark Times will probably feel like a vacation to you! :D
Cheers!

Aaron

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

I saw that in Creasy's book. Nice if you have lots of light, good eyes, lots of time, steady hands.

Not necessarily in good supply if TSH(nuclear)F.

SG

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Not a real high liklihood of fallout either though.
Besides, if it is a protracted nuclear event, batteries and EMP will probaby have destroyed most of the handheld digital fallout meters anyway... if your reactor goes, I'm sure you'll be "relocated", with or without your permission.

Never know though...

Cheers,

Aaron

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Ok BOB pre packed. on the left Binoc's and Entrenching tool, Hydration supplies (Platypus 2x 3 liter bags, and a 3 liter hydration pack) the Pack it goes into. Then there's my Vest and Waterproof. Personal hygene kit, Medkit, rain poncho, Utility belt, emergency blankets and Bag, Knife sheath, axe, mess kit, Mug, various plastic bottles, MTAC holster, XDm Mags, and ammo, Robinson XCR mags and ammo, Remington 870 and Ammo, Moving up right, we have head net, and gunbelt, Light sticks, regular canteen pad and Modular Sleep System.

The packed version does not have the weapons shown.

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PlicketyCat
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Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Note: sorry that we didn't get a chance to show you each and every piece of our modular BOB system... just ran out of time packing for the move. A lot of stuff is rat-f**ked for long distance highway travel -- bulk of the food & water are in the truck, same with the ammo (only 5000 rounds per vehicle through Canada), clothes are in the truck, etc etc.  This version of the BOB is more specifically if something goes heinously wrong with the vehicles and we have to strike out on foot... at which point, we'll add back in stuff from the vehicles as necessary.

No firearms through Canada :(   We just had them FFL transferred from WA to AK... for nearly $800!!  Expensive, sure, but we'd have had to pay for their registration/permit for 3 of the guns (Savage 12g, Win 22LR, & Mossberg 30-06), and still would have had to transfer the 2 Remington 12g (high capacity mags... a no-no in Canada), our 3 hand guns, and the Robinson anyway. We might have been able to simply mail the long guns to ourselves, if we had an address, but the USPS whined about the size and weight of our double Pelican cases and UPS doesn't want to let you ship to yourself (although it's legal). Whatever, they're in good hands and insured... if anything bad happens to them or is done with them, our butts are covered!

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Poet
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Stock Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Electrolytes, Anti-Diarrhea Meds

I'm sure no one here has mentioned this. So I might as well. And I have a good excuse to mention them, too.

Yesterday, one of my toddler sons took ill with a fever hitting 103 degrees.

Acetaminophen And Ibuprofen
My wife took him to an urgent care clinic, where they prescribed "layering" with alternation of acetaminophen (like Tylenol)  and ibuprofen (like Advil).

Obviously, we got the toddler liquid formulas with baby syringes, but the idea works like this:

The ibuprofen dose lasts about 6 hours, so you start that. Then 3 hours later, you start the acetaminophen dose, which also lasts about lasts 6 hours.

This way, you have a better chance of keeping the fever and aches down with different medicines, rather than wait for the next time window if you happened to have only one medicine. You don't want to repeat a dose of the same medicine too close to the previous dose, because there is a toxicity effect.

I'm sure the same strategy can apply to adults. If you're trying to survive a natural diaster or emergency, you may find yourself susceptible to illness or pain, and it would be helpful to keep these things handy.

Electrolytes And Anti-Diarrhea Medicine
Because of fever and aches, my son was listless and had no appetite. I got him an electrolyte solution (like Pedialyte, or a generic). That was about the only thing he would down. (I put in a little ice in the bottle to keep the solution cool).

Luckily, he didn't have diarrhea, but if he did, the electrolytes and fluids would help. You don't have to pack this in liquid form. You can buy it in single serving powder form (in packages of "sticks") that you can tear open and mix into your water. Might even make the water you are drinking a little more palatable. And if you've worked up a sweat, those electrolytes will help.

Lastly, I do suggest getting anti-diarrhea medicine. Nothing like stress, bad (or not properly prepared or stored) food, and possibly contaminated water in the middle of an emergency to give you an uncomfortable run... You might even take it as a preventative if you anticipate having to be "on" for some time.

I've noticed that a lot of basic first aid kits these days no longer contain any of these medicines. But I recommend this for everyone - especially if you are responsible for young children (don't forget diapers!), or if you have elderly relatives (depends), you'll want these four things in your emergency stash. Their constitution is just weaker and more susceptible. Emergencies can lead to exhaustion can lead to vulnerability.

Poet

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
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OTC medicines

Yes to al lthe above over-the-counter medicines, but you forgot Benadryl. If anyone has an allergic reaction that stuff can be a lifesaver.

We also stock melatonin, since stress might make it hard to sleep and sleep is goof for your immune system.

Last but not least we have cold and flu meds. Nyquil, Dayquil, and especially Zicam, which stops the exponetial growth of viruses in your system. Kinda hard to deal with a SHTF situation if you're sick as a dog. Zicam comes in tablets, which are the preferred method of storing it: the spray pump tends to clog.

Saffron's picture
Saffron
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Posts: 238
How to Raise a Healthy Child in Spite of Your Doctor

Maybe too bulky for the bug-out bag, but have it on hand at home:

http://www.amazon.com/Raise-Healthy-Child-Spite-Doctor/dp/0345342763

Has been invaluable to me over the years in discerning when I need to take action and when the body is likely to heal itself. When meds become harder to come by we'll want to know when its ok to conserve our supplies (just read the post re Deaths due to Shortages in Greek clinics - sad and scary.)

~ s

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VeganD
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Posts: 572
If you want to make your own

If you want to make your own electrolyte solution to carry in small packets that can be diluted in bottled water when needed for diarrhea/flu, this is a decent how to article....

one point he makes is that it is better to overdilute than make the solution too concentrate. It is basically 8 or 9 teaspoons of sugar, one teasppon of salt to a liter of potable water (not exactly the same as gatorade or pedialyte, I think they have a little potassium too) but portable in an emergency.

http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2007/09/rehydration-solution.html

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