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Runner Carries Injured Foe Half Mile To Help In Middle Of Race

Just an ordinary race... With an extraordinary runner...

Runner Carries Injured Foe Half Mile To Help In Middle Of Race
"Josh Ripley didn't have to stop. Running in a recent cross country meet for Andover (Minn.) High, the junior varsity runner was making his way through the trail at the Applejack Invite when he heard a loud scream during the first mile of a two-mile race. Most of the other kids running didn't pay much attention to Lakeville South runner Mark Paulauskas, who was writhing in pain at the time, as they passed by..."
http://rivals.yahoo.com/highschool/blog/prep_rally/post/Runner-carries-i...

Another link with more details of the story:
http://myabcsportszone.com/2011/09/22/ripley-does-his-good-deed-for-the-...

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Apparently, beating the

Apparently, beating the wrong person is frowned upon. Beating the right people, on the other hand, is expected and normal...

China Beating: Anger After Man Mistaken For Petitioner
"Zhao Zhipei and three others were dragged from a hotel and bundled into a van before being dumped in their home province of Henan. Mr Zhao was later found unconscious on a road in Luoyang city. The case caused anger on China's social media sites."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-15048213

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Interview With Argentina Central Bank Head During 2001 Collapse

Insightful Public Radio interview aired today. A talk with Mario Blejer, head of Argentina's Central Bank during their financial crisis and economic collapse in 2001.

Lessons For Greece (September 29, 2011) (MP3 audio)
"Mario Blejer took over the management of Argentina’s Central Bank in the midst of one of the worst economic crises the world has seen. In December 2001, Argentina defaulted on its debt and the currency lost so much value that many people saw their savings wiped out."
http://thestory.org/archive/the_story_092911_full_show.mp3

Interestingly, Blejer advocates default - take the pain now - rather than a long, drawn out series of more loans and more austerity.

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USDA Threatens Woman And Confiscates Lemon Tree

USDA confiscates a Meyer lemon tree in Wisconsin.

The ‘Lemon Tree Lady’ Speaks Out About USDA Threats Over TREE
"...She was facing fines up to $60,000 and a federal raid if she did not comply?... They invaded her privacy, tracked her down through her purchases, and sternly warned they would get that tree one way or another. It appears she is on a “citrus watch list.”"
http://healthfreedoms.org/2011/09/24/the-lemon-tree-lady-speaks-out-abou...

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What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?

A hard-hitting article about Detroit, wrapped in a story about a girl shot in a botched SWAT team raid on the wrong house, the raid filmed for a reality TV series episode.

What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones?
"A nighttime raid. A reality TV crew. A sleeping seven-year-old. What one tragedy can teach us about the unraveling of America's middle class."
http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/11/aiyana-stanley-jones-detroit

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The Ponzi Scheme That Is Suburban America

When we think about unsustainable debt, we think of credit cards, the budget deficit, state and local retiree pension and health care liabilities.

But what about infrastructure liabilities? I never really gave much thought to our nation's crumbling infrastructure - we always see road construction crews doing repairs, and bridges built in the 1950s are still standing today.

Occasionally you hear about some rural county in Minnesota, grinding asphalt back into gravel roads... But I was rather blown away by a report that came out recently that asserts that suburbia build-out is like a Ponzi scheme. Not in the sense that rising fuel prices will make driving long distance commutes more and more difficult. More in the sense that tax revenues - especially property taxes - are not enough to cover the eventual infrastructure repairs and rebuilds that will be needed after the service life of a road - or bridge, or sewer or water system - has reached an end.

Case studies and examples with slides and illustrations...

A Complete Guide To The Ponzi Scheme That Is Suburban America (October 7, 2011)
"...The mass migration from cities to suburban areas following World War II has seen two cycles of growth and maintenance. The first cycle was paid for outright, the second is heavily financed, and the third cycle is poised at the brink of an abyss. Like Bernie Madoff, city planners swapped long-term obligations for short-term cash, expanding at an unsustainable rate and developing land they could never afford to maintain."
http://www.businessinsider.com/suburban-america-ponzi-scheme-case-study-...

Makes one think a little more about where to relocate, doesn't it?

The study is by a group called Strong Towns.

The Growth Ponzi Scheme
"We often forget that the American pattern of suburban development is an experiment, one that has never been tried anywhere before. We assume it is the natural order because it is what we see all around us. But our own history -- let alone a tour of other parts of the world -- reveals a different reality. Across cultures, over thousands of years, people have traditionally built places scaled to the individual. It is only the last two generations that we have scaled places to the automobile."
http://www.strongtowns.org/the-growth-ponzi-scheme/

The Curbside Chat Book, a PDF document to get started talking within the community (has stats, charts, etc.):
http://www.strongtowns.org/storage/reports/Curbside%20Chat%20Book-LO.pdf

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The decline of optimism in America

Here is a by-line from Gwyn Morgan published in the Toronto Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/commentary/gwyn-morgan/the-decline-of-optimism-in-america/article2196192/

 

The decline of optimism in America

Gwyn Morgan
From Monday's Globe and Mail

My recent journey to business meetings in Washington took on a negative tone even before I crossed the border. In the U.S. pre-clearance area at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, I proceeded to the retinal scanning machine of the Nexus “trusted traveller” program. I used the touch-screen to answer the usual questions and a printed card dropped out which I dutifully gave to the customs officer. To my surprise, I was directed to another room for secondary screening.

The officer looked at my card and said accusingly, “You answered yes to one of the questions.” I explained that I had answered no to all except, “Is the primary purpose of your trip business?” So began a surly cross-examination, followed by a thorough inspection of my carry-on bag right down to last vitamin pill. Meanwhile, another Canadian walked up to wait behind me, clutching his documents and customs card. The officer suddenly reached over my shoulder and ripped the documents out of the man’s hand, yelling, “Go sit down, now!” The man stood stunned, causing the officer to repeat the same directive, not once, but twice. Then he told me I was “free to go,” in the manner of a prison warden releasing an inmate.

So began my business trip to the United States, where I found other Americans to be much friendlier – but extremely worried. The first thing my airport driver said was: “Are things as bad in Canada as down here? Do you think we’re headed for a depression?” A front-page headline in USA Today underlined the reason behind his question: “The new faces of poverty: A record 46 million of us … are now considered poor, as job losses hit the middle class.” Another headline, “Federal benefits, pensions explode,” summed up the financial chasm facing the government.

Federal, civil and military public-service payments and liabilities for 2010 snowballed to $780-billion (U.S.), higher than the $690-billion cost of Social Security. The TV in my hotel room carried an ad from the American Association of Retired People: “Stop Congress from cutting our benefits – that wasn’t the deal.” Clearly, Americans are very worried about their future, and that of their country.

My discussions with business leaders did nothing to foster optimism about that future. Perhaps the most telling comment was: “The President believes that only the government can create jobs.” Even those inspired by Barack Obama’s “Yes we can” message feel they’re being treated like the enemy. He has escalated what began as justifiably severe criticism of the investment banking sector’s role in the 2008 financial meltdown into class warfare aimed at “corporations with jets” and “the rich who don’t pay their fair share,” ignoring the fact that the top 5 per cent of wealthiest Americans pay more than half the income tax.

Taking their cue from their President’s anti-business rhetoric, federal regulators have unleashed a prosecution-filled witch hunt that has corporate leaders focusing more on playing defence than creating jobs. A high-profile example is the prosecution of Seattle-based Boeing. With 850 orders for its long-delayed 787 Dreamliner plane and a history of worker strikes, Boeing decided to add a second 787 production line in South Carolina. Although none of its 26,000 unionized workers in Washington state would lose their jobs, the union petitioned the National Labor Relations Board, alleging that the new, non-unionized plant was a violation of workers’ rights. Rather than throwing out this ludicrous petition, the Democrat appointees to the board filed a legal complaint against Boeing to move the 787 line back to Washington.

I have always admired the resiliency of corporate America. Even at the bottom of the worst recessions, the private sector’s entrepreneurial energy has returned the country to economic growth. In more than a hundred visits over three decades, I have never seen that great economic engine so demoralized and less willing to bet shareholders’ savings on the country’s future.

And never has that “Welcome home” from a smiling Canadian customs officer felt so good.

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The decline of optimism in America

Here is a by-line from Gwyn Morgan published in the Toronto Globe and Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/commentary/gwyn-morgan/the-decline-of-optimism-in-america/article2196192/

 

The decline of optimism in America

Gwyn Morgan
From Monday's Globe and Mail

My recent journey to business meetings in Washington took on a negative tone even before I crossed the border. In the U.S. pre-clearance area at Toronto’s Pearson International Airport, I proceeded to the retinal scanning machine of the Nexus “trusted traveller” program. I used the touch-screen to answer the usual questions and a printed card dropped out which I dutifully gave to the customs officer. To my surprise, I was directed to another room for secondary screening.

The officer looked at my card and said accusingly, “You answered yes to one of the questions.” I explained that I had answered no to all except, “Is the primary purpose of your trip business?” So began a surly cross-examination, followed by a thorough inspection of my carry-on bag right down to last vitamin pill. Meanwhile, another Canadian walked up to wait behind me, clutching his documents and customs card. The officer suddenly reached over my shoulder and ripped the documents out of the man’s hand, yelling, “Go sit down, now!” The man stood stunned, causing the officer to repeat the same directive, not once, but twice. Then he told me I was “free to go,” in the manner of a prison warden releasing an inmate.

So began my business trip to the United States, where I found other Americans to be much friendlier – but extremely worried. The first thing my airport driver said was: “Are things as bad in Canada as down here? Do you think we’re headed for a depression?” A front-page headline in USA Today underlined the reason behind his question: “The new faces of poverty: A record 46 million of us … are now considered poor, as job losses hit the middle class.” Another headline, “Federal benefits, pensions explode,” summed up the financial chasm facing the government.

Federal, civil and military public-service payments and liabilities for 2010 snowballed to $780-billion (U.S.), higher than the $690-billion cost of Social Security. The TV in my hotel room carried an ad from the American Association of Retired People: “Stop Congress from cutting our benefits – that wasn’t the deal.” Clearly, Americans are very worried about their future, and that of their country.

My discussions with business leaders did nothing to foster optimism about that future. Perhaps the most telling comment was: “The President believes that only the government can create jobs.” Even those inspired by Barack Obama’s “Yes we can” message feel they’re being treated like the enemy. He has escalated what began as justifiably severe criticism of the investment banking sector’s role in the 2008 financial meltdown into class warfare aimed at “corporations with jets” and “the rich who don’t pay their fair share,” ignoring the fact that the top 5 per cent of wealthiest Americans pay more than half the income tax.

Taking their cue from their President’s anti-business rhetoric, federal regulators have unleashed a prosecution-filled witch hunt that has corporate leaders focusing more on playing defence than creating jobs. A high-profile example is the prosecution of Seattle-based Boeing. With 850 orders for its long-delayed 787 Dreamliner plane and a history of worker strikes, Boeing decided to add a second 787 production line in South Carolina. Although none of its 26,000 unionized workers in Washington state would lose their jobs, the union petitioned the National Labor Relations Board, alleging that the new, non-unionized plant was a violation of workers’ rights. Rather than throwing out this ludicrous petition, the Democrat appointees to the board filed a legal complaint against Boeing to move the 787 line back to Washington.

I have always admired the resiliency of corporate America. Even at the bottom of the worst recessions, the private sector’s entrepreneurial energy has returned the country to economic growth. In more than a hundred visits over three decades, I have never seen that great economic engine so demoralized and less willing to bet shareholders’ savings on the country’s future.

And never has that “Welcome home” from a smiling Canadian customs officer felt so good.

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Peak Silver/Energy

Peak Silver Revisited

Impacts of a Global Depression, Declining Ore Grades & a Falling EROI

http://www.financialsense.com/contributors/steve-angelo/2011/10/10/peak-silver-revisited

Global Economy Warning of an Imminent Stall

http://www.minyanville.com/businessmarkets/articles/global-economy-global-financial-crisis-currency/10/10/2011/id/37289?page=full

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Elizabeth Warren - The Woman Who Knew Too Much

If you have read Dr. Martenson's article, America Is Being Looted, then consider the following to be a story from the trenches...

The Woman Who Knew Too Much

"Millions of Americans hoped President Obama would nominate Elizabeth Warren to head the consumer financial watchdog agency she had created. Instead, she was pushed aside. As Warren kicks off her run for Scott Brown’s Senate seat in Massachusetts, Suzanna Andrews charts the Harvard professor’s emergence as a champion of the beleaguered middle class, and her fight against a powerful alliance of bankers, lobbyists, and politicians."
http://www.vanityfair.com/politics/features/2011/11/elizabeth-warren-201111

It really lays out the story of how hard the banks fought against regulations.

Poet

Bonus:

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Shipwreck In New Zealand - Oil and Toxic Substances

A Greek container ship ran aground on on a reef and started leaking oil. Tens of thousands of seabirds, seals, fish, whales, dolphins -and thousands of miles of coastline and reef will likely be severely affected. New Zealand's BIGGEST environmental disaster.

Rena: Shipwreck That Shook A Nation
"The 21-year-old, 47,000-tonne box ship left Napier laden with 1386 containers 11 carrying hazardous substances, including ferrosilicon, which can ignite when in contact with water. The ship's fuel tanks the main four located low in the now-damaged hull - contain 1700 tonnes of fuel oil and 200 tonnes of diesel. The vessel settles on a 10-degree list in a slight swell. It is the start of an unfolding disaster..."
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10759216

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Revealed - The Capitalist Network That Runs The World

Three complex systems theorists at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, combined the mathematics long used to model natural systems with comprehensive corporate data to map ownership among the world's transnational corporations (TNCs).

Revealed - The Capitalist Network That Runs The World (October 2011)
"When the team further untangled the web of ownership, it found much of it tracked back to a "super-entity" of 147 even more tightly knit companies - all of their ownership was held by other members of the super-entity - that controlled 40 per cent of the total wealth in the network. "In effect, less than 1 per cent of the companies were able to control 40 per cent of the entire network," says Glattfelder. Most were financial institutions. The top 20 included Barclays Bank, JPMorgan Chase & Co, and The Goldman Sachs Group... Concentration of power is not good or bad in itself, says the Zurich team, but the core's tight interconnections could be. As the world learned in 2008, such networks are unstable. 'If one [company] suffers distress," says Glattfelder, "this propagates.'"
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21228354.500-revealed--the-capital...

Visualization below:

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Greek Housewife Can't Afford Milk For Children

Passionate, eloquent words from a Greek housewife. Watch the video on BBC News...

Greeks Will Have 'Bulgarian Salary With London Prices' (November 4, 2011)
"Ilia Iatrou, a housewife and mother-of-two in Athens, said she could not afford to buy fresh milk anymore."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-15592957

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Music Til The End Of Days

Earthwise

Thank you so much for sharing that. A most excellent listen.

Music - especially good music - will be one of the precious and wonderful thing we will still have with us if we succeed in managing the decline from all things peak as a species. I imagine glass harps will always be around so long as we have master glassblowers, and a musical education will once again be worth far more than it is worth today.

Pachelbel's Canon in D was played by a master solo violinist as my bride walked down the forest path to where we were all waiting for her in the hollow of a two-thousand-year-old redwood tree. After the ceremony, we walked away as a new husband and wife to Haste To The Wedding.

Poet

earthwise wrote:

This is cool IMHO!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=XKRj-T4l-e8&vq=large

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Dangerous Work: "The Mine" Tn Guatemala City

Today, Guatemala. Tomorrow, the United States?

Dangerous Work: "The Mine" Tn Guatemala City (November 15, 2011)
"In Guatemala City, a place called 'The Mine' can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal. Facing the threat of mudslides, collapses, and disease, they can potentially earn twice the daily minimum wage. Associated Press photographer Rodrigo Abd documented their efforts."
http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2011/11/dangerous_work_the_mine_in_gua....

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A young man who goes by the name Paleta searches for metal in contaminated water by a tunnel where the water from sewage converges with storm water runoff. (Rodrigo Abd/Associated Press)

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Lessons In Food And Life: 'We Knew How To Be Poor'

Lessons In Food And Life: 'We Knew How To Be Poor' (November 10, 2011)
"I thought about being poor. I thought about what it means, and how many of us are feeling just like that these days. I thought about the skills required to do it well - to be poor with dignity, poor with meals on the table, poor with enough to pay for the rent. These are real concerns for so many, and my own attention goes there on a daily basis. Marilyn thinks about it too, because she’s afraid folks aren’t prepared. 'I don’t know what folks are going to do,' she said 'because they don’t know how to be poor.' She went on to tell me stories of the local food pantry set up to help those in need. Evidently people came for everything but that bag of potatoes or big hefty winter squash. They left good food, she said; they wanted things in cans or mixes. One woman wanted instant pudding, but would not take the stuff in the box that you had to mix with milk and cook. That was too much work; she wanted the stuff in cups that was already made. Marilyn just shook her head. She was worried. Really worried. I thought about it, too. What are we going to do?"
http://www.culinate.com/mix/dinner_guest/life_and_food_lessons

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Marilyn's larder.

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Poet ,some thoughts

Poet , trying not to be too bossy here  and I know it looks pretty to have the jars out where you can see them ,but I found if I put the jarred food in the box it keeps them clean and do not rust as easily .   Another thing  My husband put a little board across the front  just incase of earthquake or something. I know most people are not worried so much about this but to me no place is safe from such an emergancy .    Anyway if the jars are already in the box you could move them a lot easier . I just finished 200 quarts of pears, pear sauce , pear butter , pear juice, pear honey ..   PEARPEARPEAR .. I do not want to see one for some time !

  I just taught 7 families how to make jelly /jam   it was fun to do together  evryone broth ingred. and at the end of the afternoon we had 7 kinds of jelly to take home .   Today we were taught and made the WOOL DRYER BALLS  .  A practical thing to have and  much more fun to do together as a group  .  Having it multi generational will help these things get passed down .     These get togethers are a part of home school but anyone could  do it with friends .

FM 

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Made in America, Still. And hiring, too!

A good story about getting a good job at a good company  that makes a good product--here in America!  I found the products to be interesting from a preparation standpoint. Full story here: http://www.theburningplatform.com/?p=25342

...........................................................................I was quite surprised three weeks ago when my phone rang at 6:30pm on a Thursday evening (in itself a surprise since no one ever calls me anymore) and it was the company asking me if I could come out for an interview. Right then. Well, sure! Why not? I haven’t got anything else going on so I went. Long story short, the impromptu interview went well enough that I started on Monday. What I didn’t know at the time was that I was being tapped to take over for the ..............

.......Well, it didn’t take very long until I became aware that this company is structured to be exactly the solution that we here at TBP and the similar sites have been advocating for years. The owners are completely committed to using US made components in every possible application – even if it costs more.........

The product line may or may not have relevance to your situation but I would request that you at least take a look at the site and realize that there still are companies doing business here in what’s left of this country, successfully, without exploiting foreign labor markets or importing cheap junk parts from countries most people couldn’t find on a map. If we’re going to have any sort of respectable country going forward, please help identify and promote any US owned and operated companies you know of. Quit shopping at the big box stores. Tell the big banks to suck it. Get a garden started using non-GMO seeds. Think, speak, act.

**If anyone is offended by the plug, consider how many times Casey’s letter gets free ads ’round here…**

www.solarstik.com

http://www.solarstik.com/

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hey earthwise

If you like stuff made in the USA, check out Lodge Cast Iron. They just went to a third shift for the demand, because the cast iron cookware from overseas is of very poor quality. You've probably seen their skillets at a Cracker Barrel restaurant store, but the things their factory stores sell are truly amazing. My husband has been ordered to stop bringing me Lodge cast iron kettles, pizza pans, skillets and such: just because one of his clients is near their Georgia factory store is no reason to go crazy, but he loves these people. I agree that we will need larger pans and skillets that last if half his relatives bug out here, but I am running out of room for it all...

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safewrite wrote: If you like

safewrite wrote:

If you like stuff made in the USA, check out Lodge Cast Iron. They just went to a third shift for the demand, because the cast iron cookware from overseas is of very poor quality. You've probably seen their skillets at a Cracker Barrel restaurant store, but the things their factory stores sell are truly amazing. My husband has been ordered to stop bringing me Lodge cast iron kettles, pizza pans, skillets and such: just because one of his clients is near their Georgia factory store is no reason to go crazy, but he loves these people. I agree that we will need larger pans and skillets that last if half his relatives bug out here, but I am running out of room for it all...

Thanks Safewrite,

I just quickly scanned the site and it looks like stuff I'd definitely be interested in so I bookmarked the site for later consumption. It seems like their products are retro, you know, stuff like it was made in the old days. I think I'm an anacronism, born a century too late.

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Lodge Cast Iron? Excellent!

For everyday use, we have a Lodge Cast Iron combo cooker (a 3-quart Dutch oven with long handle and a shallow skillet that doubles as the lid for the oven). We use the skillet more often than the Dutch oven part. We also have a small Lodge Cast Iron skillet one just for eggs.

Works great, though it takes a little longer to season and clean up. But it's nice to know we're not ingesting teflon bits.

Maybe one day when we have a home of our own, I'll look into getting some of the machined Griswold antiques that are thinner and lighter.

Poet

safewrite wrote:

If you like stuff made in the USA, check out Lodge Cast Iron. They just went to a third shift for the demand, because the cast iron cookware from overseas is of very poor quality. You've probably seen their skillets at a Cracker Barrel restaurant store, but the things their factory stores sell are truly amazing. My husband has been ordered to stop bringing me Lodge cast iron kettles, pizza pans, skillets and such: just because one of his clients is near their Georgia factory store is no reason to go crazy, but he loves these people. I agree that we will need larger pans and skillets that last if half his relatives bug out here, but I am running out of room for it all...

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Another Teen Flash Mob Hit A Retail Store

Another teen flash mob hit a convenience store. This time, 78 people. Some paid for items, some didn't steal but watched (in training?), many stole. But it appears most were part of the organized effort.

The convenience store called "911" but they were gone before the police could arrive.

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/bestoftv/2011/11/22/exp-pn-teen-flash-r...

I'm afraid we may end up with stores like those in Third World Countries. You tell the clerk what you want, they go to the back and get it for you.

Poet

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Robert Fisk: Why Torturers Film Their Handiwork

Robert Fisk: Why Torturers Film Their Handiwork (November 26, 2011)
"When prisoners were brought to Saddam Hussein's intelligence service for interrogation, their torturers often videotaped the torment. In the years after his downfall, I lectured around the world on the illegality and the immorality and the outrageous civilian slaughter of the invasion of Iraq by George W Bush and Lord Blair... But I also carried with me extracts from those obscene videos – just in case the war's detractors forgot just what an iniquitous man Saddam actually was."
http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/fisk/robert-fisk-why-t...

Note: If you search Google, you can find some of the pictures and videos mentioned. Like the flash grenade tossed at a farmer and his sheep.

Poet

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Gang-Related Activity in the US Armed Forces Increasing

Wonder how this will play out in the coming score of years...

Gang-Related Activity in the US Armed Forces Increasing (January 12, 2007, but still relevant)
"Gang members may enlist in the military to escape their current environment or gang lifestyle. Some gang members may also enlist to receive weapons, combat, and convoy support training; to obtain access to weapons and explosives; or as an alternative to incarceration. Upon discharge, they may employ their military training against law enforcement officials and rival gang members. Such military training could ultimately result in more organized, sophisticated, and deadly gangs, as well as an increase in deadly assaults on law enforcement officers."
http://militarytimes.com/static/projects/pages/ngic_gangs.pdf (PDF)

Didn't have to wait very long...

Tension Follows Rash Of Home Invasions By Masked Attackers (November 26, 2011)
"The crews of bad guys bash down doors in the night or early morning hours, wearing masks and carrying guns as they stalk their victims. 'These guys are violent criminals,' said Franceska Perot, a spokeswoman for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. 'You see them now more prepared - ski masks, zip ties (handcuffs), firearms. They basically have a plan when they go into these homes.'"
http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Tension-follows-rash-of-...

Somewhat related... What do medieval warriors and today's gangsta rappers have in common?

The entire video below is interesting (especially starting around 3 minutes) but the actual answer starts rolling out slowly around 17 minutes...

Jamie's Dream School | David Starkey on History and the Hoard

Link to the video above:

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Autism Boom: An Epidemic Of Disease Or Of Discovery?

So much is wrong in this article. Don't know where to begin...

Autism Boom: An Epidemic Of Disease Or Of Discovery? (December 11, 2011)
"...Society is marshaling resources in the name of autism as never before. In California alone, the cost of state-funded developmental services for people with autism has climbed more than 300% over the last decade, to $638 million annually. In California public schools, the number of students receiving autism services, including speech, behaviorial and other therapies, has grown fivefold since 2000, driving up special education costs even as school budgets are being slashed."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/autism/la-me-autism-day-one-html,0,121...

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Nothing wrong with the article

Poet wrote:
So much is wrong in this article. Don't know where to begin...

There is so much wrong with the problem spelled out in the article, is that what you are saying? 

As someone who has lived with autism for over 15 years I've seen just how many autistic kids there are, in more than one state.  Autism is real, heart-breaking, and not going away.  It is bad that so much money has to be thrown at helping these kids, but consider how life will likely be like for them ten, twenty years from now.  And they must be helped when they are young.  Therapies like ABA are expensive but what can working parents do during the day?  And it's not like we could throw them away like we used to, the state mental hospitals have closed.  It's an intractable problem.

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Leave It To You To Tell Me

I know that autism is a real condition. I have friends who have autistic children. I've interacted with them. They need real help.

What I see wrong is parents shopping around for diagnoses, or the one parent who deliberately did not feed her kid breakfast on the day of evaluation so he ended up throwing a tantrum, or parents paying $4,000 for a re-evaluation by a clinic because their kid has seen other experts who say that he does not have autism.

Yes, someone with Aspergers or a milder form on the spectrum may need some help, but many certainly don't need 40 hours per week of help, or a full-time aide employed to follow EACH one around. And yet the article talks of parents getting autism-level intervention for their kid (and the accompanying expense) when autism isn't necessarily the real diagnosis, and psychologists willing to diagnose them with autism even if they aren't sure.

Autism is real. Resources are dwindling, so we need to make efficient use of them. Diagnoses need to be carefully made - not by parents shopping around. Efforts need to be properly targeted - not mismanaged.

That's what I'm saying.

Poet

r wrote:

Poet wrote:
So much is wrong in this article. Don't know where to begin...

There is so much wrong with the problem spelled out in the article, is that what you are saying? 

As someone who has lived with autism for over 15 years I've seen just how many autistic kids there are, in more than one state.  Autism is real, heart-breaking, and not going away.  It is bad that so much money has to be thrown at helping these kids, but consider how life will likely be like for them ten, twenty years from now.  And they must be helped when they are young.  Therapies like ABA are expensive but what can working parents do during the day?  And it's not like we could throw them away like we used to, the state mental hospitals have closed.  It's an intractable problem.

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Thousands Of Indian Farmers Are Committing Suicide

Not that I'm a fan of Prince Charles, but he does have a point.

The GM Genocide: Thousands Of Indian Farmers Are Committing Suicide After Using Genetically Modified Crops (November 3, 2008)
"When Prince Charles claimed thousands of Indian farmers were killing themselves after using GM crops, he was branded a scaremonger. In fact, as this chilling dispatch reveals, it's even WORSE than he feared."
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1082559/The-GM-genocide-Thousand...

Yes, it's not just genetically modified seeds. It's also drought, water table loss, debt, unscrupulous lenders, and a country where debts are shameful and can't be discharged by bankrutpcy with a homestead exemption. But still... Gee, thanks, Monsanto!

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Mystery Kidney Disease In Central America

Mystery Kidney Disease In Central America (December 12, 2011)
"A mysterious epidemic is sweeping Central America - it's the second biggest cause of death among men in El Salvador, and in Nicaragua it's a bigger killer of men than HIV and diabetes combined. It's unexplained but the latest theory is that the victims are literally working themselves to death."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16007129

Take rest breaks. Stay hydrated...

Poet

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