Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

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JAG's picture
JAG
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Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

The blogger M.D. Creekmore has put together a free survival guide/checklist called Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine for anyone that might be interested.

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Jeff -

Great stuff, marking so I can come back.  I am going to print this one out.

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Thanks JAG!

(printing it out now so as to have a look-see later...)

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

V the troll here.

Since this site is not a doom and gloom site I was happy to see 

the title of the thread include " i feel fine"

As an additional resource I highly recommend 

"Camping and Woodcraft" by Horace Kephart

It is almost 100 years old but has been reprinted in

paperback. I have a hardcover edition I bought over 40 years ago.

The camping info is somewhat dated, but if you want to know

how to make it in the woods without modern conveniences this is the book.

Try making a pot out of bark and boiling water on an open fire with it,

It works. 

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

"It's The End of the World as we Know It" ; gotta listen to R.E.M. while you read the list!

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

JAG wrote:

The blogger M.D. Creekmore has put together a free survival guide/checklist called Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine for anyone that might be interested.

This link dowloads jibberish. Any other way to access it? 

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Ivy, the link works fine for me, though you might try right clicking on it and downloading the PDF file....the expanded link is: http://www.muddywaterpress.com/It_sTheEndOfTheWorrldAsWeKnowIt_AndIfeelF...

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Poison,

You may need to update (or install) a PDF viewer to see the document correctly. If you open it as text, it will appear to be jibberish.

Link

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Couple misgivings already:

Quote:
* Look for clear water

* Avoid water that has algae growing in it

Clear water with nothing growing in it can be a sign of water toxicity. Algae are effected by many of the same poisons that other flora and fauna are. Situationally, this can be "correct", but after something like an NBC (Nuclear, Biological, Chemical) attack, this might be a strong indicator that some poison has tainted the water supply.

The "general" advice is solid, though.

Quote:

The five gallon containers sold in the sporting goods section of most

department stores work great, as do the 55 gallon plastic drums. Just be sure the drums are clean and

contained no harmful chemicals before filling.

Non-Food grade plastics leech several toxins (PBA [bisphenol A], most notably: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/04/bpa-in-water.php) into the water supply over time.
Food grade plastic drums = G2G
Non food grade? I'll pass.
All plastic is made from oil, which is also something to consider when storing food.
Personally, I prefer glass, though it comes at disadvantages, and I'd be lying to say I didn't have things stored in plastic.

Equally important as the water situation and unmentioned is preparation of meat. Avoid brain and spinal tissue when processing; cook throughally and be wary of the animals appearance before you shoot it. Is it mangy? Are there open sores or wounds? Does it twitch, or act erratic?
These can be signs of disease or illness. 

As you all might imagine, I am rolling my eyes about his "arsenal" posts. No "ruffled feathers" - if what you've got works for you, that's super.
But, I'd urge people to remember that they have two arms, and most weapons require two hands to shoot.
Have a rifle, have a sidearm.
Beyond that, there is no logic in having a specific tool for each different possible scenario until you're highly proficient with the "basics".
Most likely case: None of us will ever need to make a 500 yard prescision shot.

Don't focus on buying a tremendous amount of equipment that *might* come in useful in that one in a million chance scenario.
Generalist weapons that work "well enough" in all situations are a far better bet. Had you spent all that money on training and ammunition, you wouldn't need to focus on equipment to "see you through" unfamiliar or difficult situations.

For me, I personally don't like variety. Having "this and that" clutters up my safe, complicates my magazine buying, spare parts, caliber stocking and training. So his advice here seems foolish - espcially considering his "budget" arsenal, which includes a Smith and Wesson Model 10 - a pistol that holds 1/3 what a G17 holds, and costs twice as much, is significantly less durable and reliable under "field" conditions. Not sensible.

Simple, common manual of arms (see, malfunction clearances, magazine change characteristics ad nauseum), magazines that are common to "all" weapons and hell and back dependability are the order of the day.

For this reason, I've crossed into the dark side and went to Com-Bloc weapons - Kalishnikov variants - because despite the claims, they're accurate, durable, rugged as hell and very functional.
Every shoulder-fired Kalishnikov has the same "manual of arms"  so whether it's a PSL, AK103 or a RPK, there is no "change" in the location of your operations. I favor Glocks, but many "suitable" pistols exist.

The rest of the article is pretty solid. Concur with emphesis on Preventitive medicine as a First Aid priority, and the other "general" information.

Just wanted to share my thoughts on it.
Hopefully, they're helpful.

Cheers!

Aaron

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The CM Community Survival Guide?

Perhaps, we should, as a community, author or own survival guide. We could each volunteer to research a particular topic according to our individual strengths and interests. We could then compile it into a PDF for our own reference and to "shove down the throats" of newbies (LOL).

The Red Pill Survival Guide?

Anybody interested?

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

JAG,

I think that'd be a great side project.
It'd have to come on the tail end of some pictorials and experiences, but it'd be a great asset.

I can think of half a dozen or so things right off the top of my head that I had to learn the hard way;
-Making rope out of vines
-Starting a fire in a downpour
-Building shelter and insulating it with scavenged materials
-Improvising a water Filter with charcoal and socks
-Jigging for fish with a stick, line and a hook
-Ownership and skill building with firearms and such....

If I get some time off (which I might for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday) I can start sinking my teeth into a "survival" primer.
Basically the things I listed. If there's a consensus, let me know and I'll get out to the woodline with a ruck, sleeping bag and blade.
Cheers!

Aaron

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

One point to consider about 55 gallon drums is that you can buy food grade drum liners that are made specifically to handle food. If you use one of those, then you don't have to worry about the kind of plastic that a drum is made of.

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Hi all.

I value these discussions very much and would like to poke in a couple things...my apologies for not having much to add to the discussion.

  • I would very much value your perspectives in a survival guide, especially if it was "101" style
  • How does one know if one is buying "food grade" drums, storage containers, plastics, or not?
  • Is regular-old-run-of-the-mill PVC from the hardware store considered "food grade" or does it leach..um..."bad stuff"...into the water?  If not safe, why do we plumb our houses with it?

Take care.

-Brandon

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Hi Brandon

Survival+: Structuring Prosperity for Yourself and the Nation
by Charles Hugh Smith

Good start here

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Brandon:  "food grade" drums, storage containers, plastics, or not?"

There are two "good" plastics especially suitable for food.. Polypropylene (PP , 5 ) , and Polyethylene. (HDPE, MDPE (2) )

the others - codes 1, 3,4,6,7 are bad.. especially PVC, and polystyrene,  especially at high temps..

http://www.ides.com/resources/plastic-recycling-codes.asp

Most plastic objects have a recycling code on them, it's a triangle with a number inside, and often a mnemonic below.. (eg PP , PVC , MDPE etc..)  Food grade is often indicated by a "knife and fork" symbol ..

a good rule of thumb is if there's any plastic smell from the container..  = bad thing.. (tm)

Plastic plumbing.. = yeuch (IMHO) .. copper is far better.. just a bit more expensive.. copper is bacteria/algae unfriendly, and also a useful trace element.. and it lasts.. centuries. Plastics leach, age, become brittle.. Ok for waste pipes, wouldn't like them for drinking water though..

http://www.builderswebsource.com/techbriefs/cpvccopper.htm#Health%20CPVC

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

Thanks Johnny.  I've glanced over it, but haven't dug in yet.  I will be reading this along with other guides suggested in this thread for sure.

I just realized I should clarify my first bullet point.  What I meant to say was "If the community here at CM.com was going to make a survival guide, built from their own perspectives and experiences, I would value that very much and would support it in whatever way I could."

Plato,

Thanks for the info...straight forward, easy to follow.

What does "and also a useful trace element" mean?  Also, the last article you linked to mentions that copper has it's own health effects (or can anyway).  What about stainless steel?  I've heard that can leach nickel into water...any experience with these?  I'm considering putting in a POE water filter system in my house, and re-doing the plumbing, but I want it to be as safe as possible...or at least be able to be honest with myself that I'm sacrificing health because I can't afford it.

Thanks for your time.

-Brandon

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Re: Its The End Of The World We Know It And I Feel Fine

This ebook is no longer available on his website, so I was wondering if someone would mind emailing me a copy of the ebook? I'd sincerely appreciate it.

Thanks in advance!

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RE:food grade drum liners

Where can I buy these liners? Do you have an online source?

Thanks for sharing,

GentleLioness

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This might help

GentleLioness wrote:

Where can I buy these liners? Do you have an online source?

Thanks for sharing,

GentleLioness

Welcome Gentle.....

Link to food storage thread with info on where to find liners.

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/successful-food-storage-day-9-familes-4-tons-5-hours-lessons-learned-recommendations/27519

Good luck

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book recommendation

You guys probably already know about Jim Rawles, but his book is reasonably priced and I found it useful enough to buy extra copies to give out to people (as I did the Crash Course DVD).

http://www.amazon.com/How-Survive-End-World-Know/dp/0452295831/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312429797&sr=8-1

There is also a lot of good information on his blog site http://www.survivalblog.com/

I was(am) a daily reader of survivalblog.com before I discovered this web site.

He was selling a Survivalblog 2005-2010 archive CD but I think the CD supplier dropped it recently.  I think it is still available for Kindle but the Kindle version is hard to search.

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On water

PCV, CPVC, copper, etc. all leach chemicals into water.  The major variables are temperature, pressure, pH, and time.

PCV and CPCV are not a real concern at normal (40-70 degrees) room temps and average usage.  By usage I mean the water isn't standing in the pipes for weeks on end, absorbing more chemicals.  Even if it was, flushing eliminates the water with high chemical load.

Copper corrodes, and that corrosion can be accelerated by pH under about 8 or so.  Neutral (7) and lower pH strips the oxide layer off the inside of the copper pipe, exposing fresh metal to "hungry" water.  Copper is also an excellent algacide, making it a good choice for home piping, but not perfect.

Stainless steel is used in every industry having to do with food, in almost every process imaginable.  It does leach MINUTE amounts of metals, mostly chromium, iron, and nickel, but in my health-conscious opinion, not enough to warrant staying away. The primary metal leached is chromium.  Chromium 6 (hexavalent) has been shown to cause health problems, chromium 3 is actually included in vitamins/supplements-

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/chromium/

Here's the facts on SS for cooking-

http://www.icdachromium.com/pdf/publications/crfile1sep96.htm

Personally, I use glass for every application I can.  If you want to store water in glass, a 6-gallon carboy will cost you about $35 at a beer or wine making store.

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