Important films, books or internet pages we all should study- Add your own

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Re: Part 19&20 - "Better Than The Real Thing" & "Flexible ...

VF,

I don't know about you but last time I checked, my lifespan was finite.  In the interest of making the wisest use of the time I have left, could you please give a quick synopsis of what is on these video clips so I know what I'm getting into here.  Thanks.

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Index of All Books Posted To Date ...

ao wrote:

VF,

I don't know about you but last time I checked, my lifespan was finite.  In the interest of making the wisest use of the time I have left, could you please give a quick synopsis of what is on these video clips so I know what I'm getting into here.  Thanks.

ao,

In your previous post to this thread, you asked for an index of books and authors when the thread was being built organically with the help of other forum member's. Since this was impossible to achieve until there were a sufficient list, this was left out for some time, but added at post #208. For your benefit, I'll yet again post that index below.

As to the issue of James Burke's "Connections" series, the reference to that was given in post #236. For your pleasure, I will, yet again, reproduce that information below also. If I am to spoon feed the information within this thread to prove its worth, is there much point to the exercise in the first place, or is there an underlying issue that you would care to broach that other members to this forum have missed, and are not a party to ...

~ VF ~

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Connections was a ten-episode documentary television series created, written and presented by science historian James Burke. The series was produced and directed by Mick Jackson of the BBC Science & Features Department and first aired in 1978 (UK) and 1979 (USA). It took an Interdisciplinary approach to the history of science and invention and demonstrated how various discoveries, scientific achievements, and historical world events were built from one another successively in an interconnected way to bring about particular aspects of modern technology. The series was noted for Burke's crisp and enthusiastic presentation (and dry humour), historical reenactments, and intricate working models.

{Continued ...}

This is a list of all books that have been posted so far. Clicking on any book will lead you instantly to its location, description, and any film companioning it :-

A)

The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy ~ by Douglas Adams

B)

The Everything and Nothing ~ by Meher Baba

Games People Play ~ by Eric Berne

The Coming Generational Storm by Kotlikoff and Burns

The King James Version of the Holy Bible

The Web of Debt ~ by Ellen Hodgson Brown, J.D.

The Best Way to Rob A Bank Is To Own One ~ by William Kurt Black

Propaganda ~ by Edward L. Bernays

Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization ~ by Lester R. Brown

C)

How To Win Friends And Influence People ~ by Dale Carnegie

Oil Crisis ~ by Colin Cambell

The Homeowner's Guide to Renewable Energy: Achieving Energy Independence ~ by Daniel D. Chiras

Silent Spring ~ by Rachel Carson

D)

The Selfish Gene ~ by Richard Dawkins

The God Delusion ~ by Richard Dawkins

The Origin of Species ~ by Charles Darwin

The Brothers Karamazov ~ by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Idiot ~ by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Notes from the Underground - by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

E)

The Dhammapada ~ Translated by Eknath Easwaran

F)

No More Free Markets or Free Beer ~ by Burton W. Folsom, Jr

Ecodefense: A Field Guide To Monkey wrenching ~ by Dave Foreman

Man's Search for Meaning ~ by Victor Frankl

G)

Dumbing Us Down ~ by John Taylor Gatto

Weapons of Mass Instruction ~ by John Taylor Gatto

H)

Economics in One Lesson ~ by Henry Hazlitt

Siddhartha ~ by Hermann Hesse

Island ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World Revisited ~ by Aldous Huxley

The Road to Serfdom, by F.A. Hayek

A Brief History of Time ~ by Stephen Hawking

Catch 22 - by Joseph Heller

Power Down ~ Richard Heinberg

The Party's Over - Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial Societies ~ by Richard Heinberg

The Trial of Henry Kissinger- Christopher Hitchens

The Transition Handbook - by Rob Hopkins

J)

The Sorrows of Empire ~ by Chalmers A Johnson

Free Lunch by David Cay Johnston

K)

The Long Emergency - SURVIVING the End of Oil ~ by James Howard Kunstler

World Made By Hand ~ by James Howard Kunstler

The General Theory of Employment, Interest & Money ~ by John Maynard Keynes

No Logo ~ by Naomi Klein

An Agorist Primer ~ by Samuel Edward Konkin

M)

Human Action ~ by Ludwig von Mises

On Truth: The Tyranny of Illusion ~ by Stefan Molyneux

Universally Preferable Behavior ~ by Stefan Molyneux

The Life You Were Born To Live ~ by Dan Millman

The Road ~ by Cormac McCarthy

N)

Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent ~ by Andrew Nikiforuk

O)

1984 ~ by George Orwell

Animal Farm ~ by George Orwell

P)

The God of the Machine ~ by Isabel Paterson

Confessions of an Economic Hitman ~ by John Perkins

Q)

The Evolution of Civilizations ~ by Carroll Quigley

Tragedy & Hope ~ by Carroll Quigley

R)

Atlas Shrugged ~ by Ayn Rand

The Virtue of Selfishness ~ by Ayn Rand

All Quiet on the Western Front ~ by Erich Maria Remarque

All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education ~ by Sir Ken Robinson

S)

Twilight in the Desert by Matthew Simmons

Of Mice & Men ~ by John Steinbeck

The Grapes Of Wrath ~ by John Steinbeck

Cosmos ~ by Carl Sagan

T)

The Secret Life of Nature ~ by Peter Tompkins

Under Milk Wood - A Play for Voices ~ by Dylan Thomas

Fear & Loathing In Las Vegas ~ by Hunter S Thompson

The Collapse of Complex Societies ~ by Joseph A. Tainter

Tao Te Ching ~ by Lao Tzu

W)

The Great Plains ~ by Walter Prescott Webb

The Great Frontier ~ by Walter Prescott Webb

Empire Of Debt by Bill Bonner & Addison Wiggin

Prometheus Rising ~ by Robert Anton Wilson

Financial Reckoning Day ~ by William Bonner and Addison Wiggin

~ VF ~

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"World Made by Hand"

hey gang --

Just finished reading this book today.  It's a novel set in upstate NY perhaps 10 years after SHTF.  The "S" in this case involves nukes taking out DC & LA, then a few serious flu pandemics killing off maybe 50%+ of the population.  Electricity is essentially done, there's no oil/gas/propane to be had.  The economy is nearly completely localized.  Some folks have adapted well and busily cobble together the necessities of life.  Others drink/drug/despair.  

I won't go into plot specifics, but I'll just say I enjoyed the book even if it isn't super-excellent writing.  It's an intriguing look at a possible future where things have gotten vastly more simple.  There are still good guys and bad guys and we're-not-quite-sure-about-these-guys.  But it's a worthwhile read and I reckon I'll probably get the sequel ("The Witch of Hebron") when it goes paperback.

FWIW, the author is James Howard Kunstler -- who most famously wrote "The Long Emergency" -- and you can certainly hear echoes of his non-fiction work in this book.  All in all, I think it provides a hopeful glimpse of things-that-might-come.  Sure, civilization suffers enormous loss, but it putters along anyhow.  And many of the best pleasures of life on this planet (good food, home-made music, and love/camaraderie of a sort this society sorely lacks) are still present or more so -- since 99.9% of the modern distractions have gone the way of the buffalo.

One man's opinion...

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

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Re: "World Made by Hand"

Sequel, "Witch", is even better.

SG

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

Episode #160- Who Owns Your Property?

2010/11/07/ 56:50

From Locke and the laws of nature to governments and the legal war of words, the question of property is not as simple as it appears, and the answers may surprise you. Join us this week on The Corbett Report as we ask the question Who Owns Your Property?
Download the episode from here: http://www.corbettreport.com/index.php?i=Episodes
(The first 16:10 minutes covers current news)

 
Also, check out the incredible new video series from Richard Andrew Grove and Lisa Arbercheski of TragedyandHope.com, Paul Verge of DivergentFilms.com and Jan Irvin of GnosticMedia.com. It's entitled 'What You've Been Missing' / Episode 01 / Exposing the Noble Lie.

What You've Been Missing was created to fill the massive gap created by corporate media, between itself and reality.

A virtual variety show with a point, WYBM helps you learn how to outgrow the status quo; through a systematic process of critical thinking supplemented with comedy.

-littleone

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Re: Index of All Books Posted To Date ...

VF,

I hadn't see this yet!  Thank YOU so much for doing this!!!!!!  I'm in the process of downloading them all onto a zip so I can read them on my trip!  I'll have plenty of time at night, sitting next to the camp fire, waiting for the next mornings hunt!  Awesome!!!!

Thank you again!

Vanityfox451 wrote:

ao wrote:

VF,

I don't know about you but last time I checked, my lifespan was finite.  In the interest of making the wisest use of the time I have left, could you please give a quick synopsis of what is on these video clips so I know what I'm getting into here.  Thanks.

ao,

In your previous post to this thread, you asked for an index of books and authors when the thread was being built organically with the help of other forum member's. Since this was impossible to achieve until there were a sufficient list, this was left out for some time, but added at post #208. For your benefit, I'll yet again post that index below.

As to the issue of James Burke's "Connections" series, the reference to that was given in post #236. For your pleasure, I will, yet again, reproduce that information below also. If I am to spoon feed the information within this thread to prove its worth, is there much point to the exercise in the first place, or is there an underlying issue that you would care to broach that other members to this forum have missed, and are not a party to ...

~ VF ~

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Connections was a ten-episode documentary television series created, written and presented by science historian James Burke. The series was produced and directed by Mick Jackson of the BBC Science & Features Department and first aired in 1978 (UK) and 1979 (USA). It took an Interdisciplinary approach to the history of science and invention and demonstrated how various discoveries, scientific achievements, and historical world events were built from one another successively in an interconnected way to bring about particular aspects of modern technology. The series was noted for Burke's crisp and enthusiastic presentation (and dry humour), historical reenactments, and intricate working models.

{Continued ...}

This is a list of all books that have been posted so far. Clicking on any book will lead you instantly to its location, description, and any film companioning it :-

A)

The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy ~ by Douglas Adams

B)

The Everything and Nothing ~ by Meher Baba

Games People Play ~ by Eric Berne

The Coming Generational Storm by Kotlikoff and Burns

The King James Version of the Holy Bible

The Web of Debt ~ by Ellen Hodgson Brown, J.D.

The Best Way to Rob A Bank Is To Own One ~ by William Kurt Black

Propaganda ~ by Edward L. Bernays

Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization ~ by Lester R. Brown

C)

How To Win Friends And Influence People ~ by Dale Carnegie

Oil Crisis ~ by Colin Cambell

The Homeowner's Guide to Renewable Energy: Achieving Energy Independence ~ by Daniel D. Chiras

Silent Spring ~ by Rachel Carson

D)

The Selfish Gene ~ by Richard Dawkins

The God Delusion ~ by Richard Dawkins

The Origin of Species ~ by Charles Darwin

The Brothers Karamazov ~ by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Idiot ~ by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Notes from the Underground - by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

E)

The Dhammapada ~ Translated by Eknath Easwaran

F)

No More Free Markets or Free Beer ~ by Burton W. Folsom, Jr

Ecodefense: A Field Guide To Monkey wrenching ~ by Dave Foreman

Man's Search for Meaning ~ by Victor Frankl

G)

Dumbing Us Down ~ by John Taylor Gatto

Weapons of Mass Instruction ~ by John Taylor Gatto

H)

Economics in One Lesson ~ by Henry Hazlitt

Siddhartha ~ by Hermann Hesse

Island ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World Revisited ~ by Aldous Huxley

The Road to Serfdom, by F.A. Hayek

A Brief History of Time ~ by Stephen Hawking

Catch 22 - by Joseph Heller

Power Down ~ Richard Heinberg

The Party's Over - Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial Societies ~ by Richard Heinberg

The Trial of Henry Kissinger- Christopher Hitchens

The Transition Handbook - by Rob Hopkins

J)

The Sorrows of Empire ~ by Chalmers A Johnson

Free Lunch by David Cay Johnston

K)

The Long Emergency - SURVIVING the End of Oil ~ by James Howard Kunstler

World Made By Hand ~ by James Howard Kunstler

The General Theory of Employment, Interest & Money ~ by John Maynard Keynes

No Logo ~ by Naomi Klein

An Agorist Primer ~ by Samuel Edward Konkin

M)

Human Action ~ by Ludwig von Mises

On Truth: The Tyranny of Illusion ~ by Stefan Molyneux

Universally Preferable Behavior ~ by Stefan Molyneux

The Life You Were Born To Live ~ by Dan Millman

The Road ~ by Cormac McCarthy

N)

Tar Sands: Dirty Oil and the Future of a Continent ~ by Andrew Nikiforuk

O)

1984 ~ by George Orwell

Animal Farm ~ by George Orwell

P)

The God of the Machine ~ by Isabel Paterson

Confessions of an Economic Hitman ~ by John Perkins

Q)

The Evolution of Civilizations ~ by Carroll Quigley

Tragedy & Hope ~ by Carroll Quigley

R)

Atlas Shrugged ~ by Ayn Rand

The Virtue of Selfishness ~ by Ayn Rand

All Quiet on the Western Front ~ by Erich Maria Remarque

All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education ~ by Sir Ken Robinson

S)

Twilight in the Desert by Matthew Simmons

Of Mice & Men ~ by John Steinbeck

The Grapes Of Wrath ~ by John Steinbeck

Cosmos ~ by Carl Sagan

T)

The Secret Life of Nature ~ by Peter Tompkins

Under Milk Wood - A Play for Voices ~ by Dylan Thomas

Fear & Loathing In Las Vegas ~ by Hunter S Thompson

The Collapse of Complex Societies ~ by Joseph A. Tainter

Tao Te Ching ~ by Lao Tzu

W)

The Great Plains ~ by Walter Prescott Webb

The Great Frontier ~ by Walter Prescott Webb

Empire Of Debt by Bill Bonner & Addison Wiggin

Prometheus Rising ~ by Robert Anton Wilson

Financial Reckoning Day ~ by William Bonner and Addison Wiggin

~ VF ~

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

The book titled, "Patriots" by James Wesley Rawles is a fiction novel that I recently finished reading and recommend.  There are plenty of reviews on Amazon that average out to a four star rating.  I would have to go along with several of the reviews that give it five stars for survival information and three stars for character development and writing skill.  I enjoyed reading this book and learned a few things as well.  I may read it again and take notes the next time.

For those not familiar with James Wesley Rawles, he has a good web site as well.  It's titled, "SurvivalBlog.com."

Here's a link: http://www.survivalblog.com/about.html

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A People's History of the United States ~ by Howard Zinn

A People's History of the United States ~ 1492 ~ Present ~ by Howard Zinn (Complete online Book)

Howard Zinn wrote:

The treatment of heroes (Columbus) and their victims (the Arawaks) - the quiet acceptance of conquest and murder in the name of progress - is only one aspect of a certain approach to history, in which the past is told from the point of view of governments, conquerors, diplomats, leaders. It is as if they, like Columbus, deserve universal acceptance, as if they - the Founding Fathers, Jackson, Lincoln, Wilson, Roosevelt, Kennedy, the leading members of Congress, the famous Justices of the Supreme Court - represent the nation as a whole. The pretense is that there really is such a thing as "the United States," subject to occasional conflicts and quarrels, but fundamentally a community of people with common interests. It is as if there really is a "national interest" represented in the Constitution, in territorial expansion, in the laws passed by Congress, the decisions of the courts, the development of capitalism, the culture of education and the mass media.

"History is the memory of states," wrote Henry Kissinger in his first book, A World Restored, in which he proceeded to tell the history of nineteenth-century Europe from the viewpoint of the leaders of Austria and England, ignoring the millions who suffered from those statesmen's policies. From his standpoint, the "peace" that Europe had before the French Revolution was "restored" by the diplomacy of a few national leaders. But for factory workers in England, farmers in France, colored people in Asia and Africa, women and children everywhere except in the upper classes, it was a world of conquest, violence, hunger, exploitation - a world not restored but disintegrated.

My viewpoint, in telling the history of the United States, is different: that we must not accept the memory of states as our own. Nations are not communities and never have been, The history of any country, presented as the history of a family, conceals fierce conflicts of interest (sometimes exploding, most often repressed) between conquerors and conquered, masters and slaves, capitalists and workers, dominators and dominated in race and sex. And in such a world of conflict, a world of victims and executioners, it is the job of thinking people, as Albert Camus suggested, not to be on the side of the executioners.

Thus, in that inevitable taking of sides which comes from selection and emphasis in history, I prefer to try to tell the story of the discovery of America from the viewpoint of the Arawaks, of the Constitution from the standpoint of the slaves, of Andrew Jackson as seen by the Cherokees, of the Civil War as seen by the New York Irish, of the Mexican war as seen by the deserting soldiers of Scott's army, of the rise of industrialism as seen by the young women in the Lowell textile mills, of the Spanish-American war as seen by the Cubans, the conquest of the Philippines as seen by black soldiers on Luzon, the Gilded Age as seen by southern farmers, the First World War as seen by socialists, the Second World War as seen by pacifists, the New Deal as seen by blacks in Harlem, the postwar American empire as seen by peons in Latin America. And so on, to the limited extent that any one person, however he or she strains, can "see" history from the standpoint of others.

My point is not to grieve for the victims and denounce the executioners. Those tears, that anger, cast into the past, deplete our moral energy for the present. And the lines are not always clear. In the long run, the oppressor is also a victim. In the short run (and so far, human history has consisted only of short runs), the victims, themselves desperate and tainted with the culture that oppresses them, turn on other victims.

Still, understanding the complexities, this book will be skeptical of governments and their attempts, through politics and culture, to ensnare ordinary people in a giant web of nationhood pretending to a common interest. I will try not to overlook the cruelties that victims inflict on one another as they are jammed together in the boxcars of the system. I don't want to romanticize them. But I do remember (in rough paraphrase) a statement I once read: "The cry of the poor is not always just, but if you don't listen to it, you will never know what justice is."

Critical Reception

~ VF ~

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Re: A People's History of the United States ~ by Howard Zinn

Vanityfox451 wrote:

A People's History of the United States ~ 1492 ~ Present ~ by Howard Zinn (Complete online Book)

Howard Zinn wrote:

Thus, in that inevitable taking of sides which comes from selection and emphasis in history, I prefer to try to tell the story of the discovery of America from the viewpoint of the Arawaks, of the Constitution from the standpoint of the slaves, of Andrew Jackson as seen by the Cherokees, of the Civil War as seen by the New York Irish, of the Mexican war as seen by the deserting soldiers of Scott's army, of the rise of industrialism as seen by the young women in the Lowell textile mills, of the Spanish-American war as seen by the Cubans, the conquest of the Philippines as seen by black soldiers on Luzon, the Gilded Age as seen by southern farmers, the First World War as seen by socialists, the Second World War as seen by pacifists, the New Deal as seen by blacks in Harlem, the postwar American empire as seen by peons in Latin America. And so on, to the limited extent that any one person, however he or she strains, can "see" history from the standpoint of others.

My point is not to grieve for the victims and denounce the executioners. Those tears, that anger, cast into the past, deplete our moral energy for the present. And the lines are not always clear. In the long run, the oppressor is also a victim. In the short run (and so far, human history has consisted only of short runs), the victims, themselves desperate and tainted with the culture that oppresses them, turn on other victims.


Zinn's passing away was a great loss to the world of scholarship. It's always important to see history from more than one angle, and he provided the other, oft-overlooked angle. We ourselves right now are looking at current events - especially economic ones - from a non-mainstream angle.

My wife had the privilege of interviewing him when she was a high school student. One of her prized possessions is an autographed, dog-eared copy of his book.

Poet

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