Important films, books or internet pages we all should study- Add your own

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Twilight in the Desert ~ by Matthew Simmons

Twilight in the Desert 

by Matthew Simmons

Chris Martenson wrote:

Saudi Arabia is a lot closer to Peak Oil than they publicly claim. I really enjoyed this book, but then again, I enjoy diving deep. This book was most responsible for the development of my understanding of how oil reservoirs actually work and the deep technical challenges that accompany oil extraction.

Mathew Simmons On Peak Oil

Investment banker and author of "Twilight in the Desert"

at ASPO USA Peak Oil conference at Boston University,

Oct 27, 2006.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-429585738009344102

~ VF ~

 

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Power Down ~ Richard Heinberg

Power Down ~ Richard Heinberg

Chris Martenson wrote:

An extension of The Party's Over, this book lays out in some detail what the future will look like once the oil party is over. Dark stuff (no pun intended) best read in the light of day.

~ VF ~

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Home ~ A Visually Beautiful Film Of Our Time ...

Home ~ A Visually Beautiful & Thoroughly Stunning Film Of Our Time

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Home is a 2009 documentary by Yann Arthus-Bertrand. The film is almost entirely composed of aerial shots of various places on Earth. It shows the diversity of life on Earth and how humanity is threatening the ecological balance of the planet. The movie was released simultaneously on June 5, 2009 in cinemas across the globe, on DVD, Blu-ray, television, and on YouTube. Opening in 181 countries, the film broke the world record for the largest film release in history.

Click The Home Link Below To Watch The Film : -

... I hope all will enjoy the new "Click & Read" library, and will add their own books and films over time ...

A Pleasure,

~ VF ~

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

VF,

Many thanks for the prodigious list.  There is such a thing as overload though!  We want to make sure folks get these books read before or as TSHTF, not years afterwards.;-)  May I suggest you include a good reference for a speed reading book?;-)   Also, perhaps a ranking system to prioritize one's reading would be helpful.

That being said, I like a relatively short, easily read book written by a Roman Catholic priest, Joseph A. Gondek, called Land Lords of the World.  Folks can read it in one day and get a handle on things.  Also, besides your excellent recomendations (with the exception of Origin of the Species which Darwin himself had problems with his later years) and those mentioned by others, Free Lunch by David Cay Johnston and, although it's been mentioned in its own thread, I'd add Collapse here, by Jared Diamond and maybe even, Guns, Germs, and Steel.  Also, such oldies but goodies as War Is a Racket by Smedley Butler and How to Survive A Spastic Economy by David E. Rhoads.

I was also recently loaned Whatever Happened to the American Dream by Larry Burkett which is amazingly prophetic and sounds like it was written 6 months ago rather than being published in 1993.  I haven't finished it yet but it is excellent so far.  Definitely not PC though.

In addition, the last book of the Bible, the Book of Revelation, will give folks a playbook of how it's going to go down.  For example, with the four horseman, the black horseman is famine.  And the quart of wheat for a day's wages indicate that in those times, one will have to spend the equivalent of an entire day's wages on their food for just that day.  Seems rather in synch with what we're expecting, doesn't it?

V,

Guess what one of my favorite movies is?;-)  In addition to V for Vendetta, Network is another favorite movie suitable for the times.

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

Hello ao,

When I was very young, I was in shock and awe of my hometown library. All of those books on every subject under the sun. Anything you ever wanted to know, with only the imagination and which subjects to study as a stumbling block. I look back on the many books that I've read and I see some as though they are old friends; a comforting old gentleman such as Charles Dickens to while away the hours; visionaries, to the likes of Darwin, Dostoyevsky; fallen socialites such as Wilde; Shelley, Byron, Keats; all have voice, no matter the political or spiritual argument. They are sat on your lap for those hours of your afternoon reading. None told me that they were right or wrong, just that I should read them and question.

All and every subject, no matter the Worlds objection, should be read to appreciate and comprehend the counter-arguement and the devilment in the detail.

This is a compilation of books that others recommended on this thread that I've found. I've read many of them but not all, with the only omissions those I couldn't find. The compilation also includes Chris Martensons Essential Books section, where I've found more than half of them, to save people money and help aid a greater understanding of discussion inside the forum and beyond. I have also included several books of my own that people have a choice to either love or reject with their own free will.

I'll do all that I can to bring to light all of the films and books that you've mentioned. Howard Beale surely deserves dusting down for a spin as the "Mad Profit"?

~ VF ~

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Network (film)

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Network is a 1976 American satirical film released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer about a fictional television network, Union Broadcasting System (UBS), and its struggle with poor ratings. It was written by Paddy Chayefsky and directed by Sidney Lumet, and stars Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Peter Finch and Robert Duvall and features Wesley Addy, Ned Beatty and Beatrice Straight.

The film won four Academy Awards, including Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress and Best Writing, Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen.

Network has continued to receive recognition, decades after its initial release. In 2000, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". In 2002, it was inducted into the Producers Guild of America Hall of Fame as a film that has "set an enduring standard for U.S. American entertainment."In 2006, Chayefsky's script was voted one of the top ten movie scripts of all-time by the Writers Guild of America, East. In 2007, the film was 64th among the Top 100 Greatest U.S. American Films as chosen by the American Film Institute, a ranking slightly higher than the one AFI gave it ten years earlier. It is also one of the top 250 films of all time at number 210 on the influential film website the Internet Movie Database (IMDb).

Network ~ (1976)

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=216105531921215883

~ VF ~

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Free Lunch by David Cay Johnston

Free Lunch by David Cay Johnston

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

David Cay Johnston (born Dec. 24, 1948) is an investigative journalist and author. Until April 2008, he was the tax reporter with The New York Times for thirteen years. He now works as an author, reporter, radio and television esssayist, lecturer.

Johnston is the author of best-selling books on tax and economic policy, the most recently published of which is Free Lunch: How the Wealthiest Americans Enrich Themselves at Government Expense and Stick You With The Bill, about hidden subsidies, rigged markets, and corporate socialism. It follows his earlier book Perfectly Legal: The Covert Campaign to Rig Our Tax System to Benefit the Super Rich—and Cheat Everybody Else, a New York Times bestseller on the U.S. tax system that won the Investigative Reporters and Editors 2003 Book of the Year award.

Interview & Discussion

~ VF ~

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

ao

IMHO the greatest bit of moviemaking is in that film. It is when Evey is captured by the police and tortured only to discover it was actually V who imprisoned her. It is amazing on so many levels. I watch it regularly.

A very important film indeed.

V

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Re: Important films books Aldous Huxley Island

I can't remember when I first read this book but it was one of those AHA moments when I realized I was not alone in my view that we were not only on the wrong path but that there were others who recognized the same fact and were thinking about how much better an alternative might be out there if were to really look for it.

Aldous Huxley is also the subject of one of the greatest trivia questions of all time. For those of yo old enough to remember the assassination of JFK,  do you remember where you were when you received the news?

Isalnd was Huxley's last book It is the bookend to Brave New World , pun intended. I recommend both. BTW this is a very difficult book to locate

V

PS have a great trip

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Island  
Island.JPG
First US edition
(Harper and Brothers)
Author Aldous Huxley
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre(s) Science fiction,Utopian fiction
Publication date 1962
Media type Print (Hardback &Paperback)
Pages 384 pp (Paperback edition)
ISBN ISBN 0-06-008549-5(Paperback edition)
OCLC Number 20156268
Preceded by The Genius and the Goddess
Followed by None

Island is the final book by English writer Aldous Huxleypublished in 1962. It is the account of Will Farnaby, a cynical journalist who is shipwrecked on the fictional island of Pala. Island is Huxley'sutopian counterpart to his most famous work, the 1932 novel Brave New World, itself often paired withGeorge Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four. The ideas that would become Island can be seen in a foreword he wrote in 1946 to a new edition of Brave New World:

If I were now to rewrite the book, I would offer the Savage a third alternative. Between the Utopian and primitive horns of his dilemma would lie the possibility of sanity... In this community economics would be decentralist and Henry-Georgian, politics Kropotkinesque co-operative. Science and technology would be used as though, like the Sabbath, they had been made for man, not (as at present and still more so in the Brave New World) as though man were to be adapted and enslaved to them. Religion would be the conscious and intelligent pursuit of man's Final End, the unitive knowledge of immanent Tao or Logos, the transcendent Godhead or Brahman. And the prevailing philosophy of life would be a kind of HigherUtilitarianism, in which the Greatest Happiness principle would be secondary to the Final End principle – the first question to be asked and answered in every contingency of life being: "How will this thought or action contribute to, or interfere with, the achievement, by me and the greatest possible number of other individuals, of man's Final End?

Contents

 [hide]

[edit]Major themes

Island explores many of the themes and ideas that interested Huxley in the post-World War IIdecades, and were the subject of many of his nonfiction books of essays, including Brave New World RevisitedTomorrow and Tomorrow and TomorrowThe Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Some of these themes and ideas include overpopulationecologymodernitydemocracy,mysticismentheogens, and somatotypes.

Common background elements occur in both Island and Brave New World, used for good in the former and for ill in the latter. Such elements include:

Theme comparison
Island Brave New World
Drug use for enlightenment and self-knowledge Drug use for pacification and self-medication
Group living (in the form of Mutual Adoption Clubs) so that children would not have unalloyed exposure to their parents' neuroses Group living for the elimination of individuality.
Trance states for super learning Trance states for indoctrination
Assisted reproduction (low-tech artificial insemination) Assisted reproduction (high-tech test-tube babies)
Freely-available contraception to enable reproductive choice, expressive sex Mandatory contraception, socially-mandated recreational and promiscuous sex
Dangerous climb to a temple, as spiritual preparation Violent Passion Surrogate
Parrots trained to utter uplifting slogans Ubiquitous disembodied mechanical voices

The culture of Pala is the offspring of a Scottish secular humanist medical doctor, who made a medical visit to the island in the 19th century, and decided to stay and work with its Raja, who embodies the island's Mahayana Buddhist tradition, to create a society that merges the best, in Huxley's view, of East and West. The Old Raja's treatise Notes on What's What is a book within the book that explains Pala's philosophical foundations.

A central element of Palanese society is restrained industrialization, undertaken with the goal of providing fulfilling work and time for leisure and contemplation. For the Palanese, progress means a selective attitude towards technology, which Huxley contrasts to the underdeveloped poverty of the neighboring island of Rendang, and with the alienating overdevelopment of the industrialized West, chiefly through Will Farnaby's recollections of London. The Palanese embrace modern science and technology to improve medicine and nutrition, but have rejected widespread industrialization. For example, hydroelectricity is made available for refrigeration, so that surplus fresh food can be stored, improving nutrition and protecting against food shortages. Huxley viewed this selective modernization as essential for his "sane" society, even if it means that such a society is unable to militarily defend itself from its "insane" neighbors who wish to steal its natural resources.

The Palanese also circumspectly incorporated the use of "moksha medicine", a fictional entheogen taken ceremonially in rites of passage for mystical and cosmological insight. The moksha mushroom is described as "yellow" and not "those lovely red toadstools", e.g. the Amanita muscaria; this description of the moksha medicine is suggestive of Psilocybe mushrooms, a psychoactive that captivated Huxley during the latter half of his life. The recommended dosage of 400 mg, however, is in the dosage range of mescaline as opposed to psilocybin. Huxley had also been fascinated towards the end of his life by the potential benefit to humanity of substances such as mescaline and LSD. Brave New World and most of Huxley's other books were written before he first tried a psychedelic drug in 1953. [citation needed]

Many of the ideas used to describe Pala as an utopia in Island appear also in Brave New World Revisited's last chapter, which aims to propose actions which could be taken in order to prevent a democracy from turning into a totalitary world like the one described in Brave New World.

Huxley used a scene of two mantids (Gongylus gongyloides) mating to make philosophical observations about the nature of death. In another memorable scene, Will Farnaby watches a Palanese version of Oedipus Rex with a little girl. Will points out that in his version Oedipus pokes his eyes out. The girl replies that that is silly, since all the king had to do was stop being married to his mother.

The novel has served as the inspiration for the Island Foundation, a non-profit corporation "dedicated to the creation of a psychedelic culture."

[edit]Quotations

"And always, everywhere, there would be the yelling or quietly authoritative hypnotists; and in the train of the ruling suggestion givers, always everywhere, the tribes of buffoons and hucksters, the professional liars, the purveyors of entertaining irrelevances. Conditioned from the cradle, unceasingly distracted, mesmerized systematically, their uniformed victims would go on obediently marching and countermarching, go on, always and everywhere, killing and dying with the perfect docility of trained poodles. And yet in spite of the entirely justified refusal to take yes for an answer, the fact remained and would remain always, remain everywhere -- the fact that there was this capacity even in a paranoiac for intelligence, even in a devil worshipper for love; the fact that the ground of all being could be totally manifest in a flowering shrub, a human face; the fact that there was a light and that this light was also compassion"

"History is the record of what human beings have been impelled to do by their ignorance and the enormous bumptiousness that makes them canonize their ignorance as a political or religious dogma."

From the Notes on What's What:

Nobody needs to go anywhere else. We are all, if we only knew it, already there. If I only knew who in fact I am, I should cease to behave as what I think I am; and if I stopped behaving as what I think I am, I should know who I am. What in fact I am, if only the Manichee I think I am would allow me to know it, is the reconciliation of yes and no lived out in total acceptance and the blessed experience of Not-Two. In religion all words are dirty words. Anybody who gets eloquent about Buddha, or God, or Christ, ought to have his mouth washed out with carbolic soap.

Good Being is knowing who in fact we are; and in order to know who in fact we are, we must first know, moment by moment, who we think we are and what this bad habit of thought compels us to feel and do. A moment of clear and complete knowledge of what we think we are, but in fact are not, puts a stop, for the moment, to the Manichean charade. If we renew, until they become a continuity, these moments of the knowledge of what we are not, we may find ourselves all of a sudden, knowing who in fact we are.

Faith is something very different from belief. Belief is the systematic taking of unanalysed words much too seriously. Paul's words, Mohammed's words, Marx's words, Hitler's words - people take them too seriously, and what happens?

What happens is the senseless ambivalence of history - sadism versus duty, or (incomparably worse) sadism as duty; devotion counterbalanced by organized paranoia; sisters of charity selflessly tending to the victims of their own church's inquisitors and crusaders. Faith, on the contrary, can never be taken too seriously. For faith is the empirically justified confidence in our capacity to know who in fact we are, to forget the belief-intoxicated Manichee in Good Being. Give us this day our daily Faith, but deliver us, dear God, from Belief.

[edit]Eastern religion references in the text

[edit]


 

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Island ~ by Aldous Huxley

V,

 

Island ~ by Aldous Huxley

Page One ...

[quote=Aldous Huxley]

 

 

"Attention," a voice began to call, and it was as though an oboe had

suddenly become articulate. "Attention," it repeated in the same high, nasal

monotone. "Attention."

Lying there like a corpse in the dead leaves, his hair matted, his face

grotesquely smudged and bruised, his clothes in rags and muddy, Will

Farnaby awoke with a start. Molly had called him. Time to get up. Time to

get dressed. Mustn't be late at the office.

"Thank you, darling," he said and sat up. A sharp pain stabbed at his

right knee and there were other kinds of pain in his back, his arms, his

forehead.

"Attention," the voice insisted without the slightest change of tone.

Leaning on one elbow, Will looked about him and saw with bewilderment,

not the gray wallpaper and yellow curtains of his London bedroom, but a

glade among trees and the long shadows and slanting lights of early

morning in a forest. "Attention"?

Why did she say, "Attention"?

"Attention. Attention," the voice insisted—how strangely, how

senselessly!

[/quote]

 

Aldous Huxley Interviewed by Mike Wallace ~ Late 1950's

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGaYXahbcL4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUTEOY1hre4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iDPnwkU9DA

~ VF ~

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Brave New World ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World ~ by Aldous Huxley

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Brave New World is a novel by Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Set in the London of AD 2540 (632 A.F. in the book), the novel anticipates developments in reproductive technology and sleep-learning that combine to change society. The future society is an embodiment of the ideals that form the basis of futurism. Huxley answered this book with a reassessment in an essay, Brave New World Revisited (1958), and with his final work, a novel titled Island (1962), both summarized below.

In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Brave New World fifth on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

Brave New World Narrated by Aldous Huxley (Audio)

Brave New World Audio Book (Audio)

Visionary Experience - Aldous Huxley MIT Lecture '61 (Audio)

Aldous Huxley - The Ultimate Revolution ~ UC Berkeley Language Centre March 20th 1962 (Audio)

(Q & A) Aldous Huxley  - The Ultimate Revolution ~ UC Berkeley Language Centre March 20th 1962 (Audio)

~ VF ~

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Brave New World Revisited ~ by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World Revisited ~ by Aldous Huxley

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Brave New World Revisited (Harper & Row (US) 1958, Chatto & Windus (UK) 1959), written by Huxley almost thirty years after Brave New World, was a non-fiction work in which Huxley considered whether the world had moved toward or away from his vision of the future from the 1930s. He believed when he wrote the original novel that it was a reasonable guess as to where the world might go in the future. In Brave New World Revisited, he concluded that the world was becoming like Brave New World much faster than he originally thought.

Quote:

Forward

       The soul of wit may become the very body of untruth. However elegant and memorable, brevity can never, in the nature of things, do justice to all the facts of a complex situation. On such a theme one can be brief only by omission and simplification. Omission and sim­plification help us to understand -- but help us, in many cases, to understand the wrong thing; for our compre­hension may be only of the abbreviator's neatly formu­lated notions, not of the vast, ramifying reality from which these notions have been so arbitrarily abstracted.

       But life is short and information endless: nobody has time for everything. In practice we are generally forced to choose between an unduly brief exposition and no exposition at all. Abbreviation is a necessary evil and the abbreviator's business is to make the best of a job which, though intrinsically bad, is still better than nothing. He must learn to simplify, but not to the point of falsification. He must learn to concentrate upon the essentials of a situation, but without ignor­ing too many of reality's qualifying side issues. In this way he may be able to tell, not indeed the whole truth (for the whole truth about almost any important sub­ject is incompatible with brevity), but considerably more than the dangerous quarter-truths and half-truths which have always been the current coin of thought.

        The subject of freedom and its enemies is enormous, and what I have written is certainly too short to do it full justice; but at least I have touched on many aspects of the problem. Each aspect may have been some­what over-simplified in the exposition; but these successive over-simplifications add up to a picture that, I hope, gives some hint of the vastness and complexity of the original.

        Omitted from the picture (not as being unimportant, but merely for convenience and because I have dis­cussed them on earlier occasions) are the mechanical and military enemies of freedom -- the weapons and "hardware" which have so powerfully strengthened the hands of the world's rulers against their subjects, and the ever more ruinously costly preparations for ever more senseless and suicidal wars. The chapters that follow should be read against a background of thoughts about the Hungarian uprising and its re­pression, about H-bombs, about the cost of what every nation refers to as "defense," and about those endless columns of uniformed boys, white, black, brown, yel­low, marching obediently toward the common grave.

~ VF ~

 

 

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

I would like to recommend  "The Grapes of Wrath"  By John Steinbeck.  This is the book that started it all off for me and continues to resonate to this day.  In this context, I would also like to recommend the band "Rage Against the Machine" for the hard hitting, unrelenting prose of lead singer and lyricist Zack De La Rocha.  De La Rocha was on to them as far back as the mid eighties and shows no fear in exposing this "open sore on the face of Mother Earth"  

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

Atlas Shrugged - Ayn Rand

By no means a quick read, but finishing this book was a life-changing experience for me.  It helps one understand many of the events occurring right now, but most importantly provides a philosophy for living a full life.

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The Grapes Of Wrath ~ by John Steinbeck

The Grapes Of Wrath ~ by John Steinbeck

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

The Grapes of Wrath is a novel published in 1939 and written by John Steinbeck, who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1940 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. Set during the Great Depression, the novel focuses on a poor family of sharecroppers, the Joads, driven from their Oklahoma home by drought, economic hardship, and changes in the agriculture industry. In a nearly hopeless situation, partly because they were trapped in the Dust Bowl, they set out for California along with thousands of other "Okies" in search of land, jobs and dignity.

The Grapes of Wrath is frequently read in American high school and college literature classes. A celebrated Hollywood film version, starring Henry Fonda and directed by John Ford, was made in 1940; the endings of the book and the movie differ greatly.

Getting into The "Meat & Bones" of John Steinbeck ~ The Art Of Fiction

Grapes Of Wrath Resources ~ Everything You'd Ever Want To Know & All In One Place...

~ VF ~

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Of Mice & Men ~ by John Steinbeck

Of Mice & Men ~ by John Steinbeck

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Of Mice and Men is a novella written by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, it tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers during the Great Depression in California.

Based on Steinbeck's own experiences as a bindlestiff in the 1920s (before the arrival of the Okies he would vividly describe in The Grapes of Wrath), the title is taken from Robert Burns's poem, To a Mouse, which read: "The best laid schemes o' mice an' men / Gang aft agley."

Required reading in many high schools, Of Mice and Men has been a frequent target of censors for what some consider offensive and vulgar language; consequently, it appears on the American Library Association's list of the Most Challenged Books of 21st Century.

~ VF ~

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Atlas Shrugged ~ by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged ~ by Ayn Rand

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Atlas Shrugged is a novel by Ayn Rand, first published in 1957 in the United States. This was Rand's fourth, longest and last novel, and she considered it her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing. As indicated by its working title The Strike, the book explores a dystopian United States where leading innovators, ranging from industrialists to artists, refuse to be exploited by society. The protagonist, Dagny Taggart, sees society collapse around her as the government increasingly asserts control over all industry, while society's most productive citizens, led by the mysterious John Galt, progressively disappear. Galt describes the strike as "stopping the motor of the world" by withdrawing the "minds" that drive society's growth and productivity; with their strike these creative minds hope to demonstrate that the economy and society would collapse without the profit motive and the efforts of the rational and productive.

The novel's title is a reference to the mythical Titan, Atlas, who in the novel is said to hold the weight of the heavens on his shoulders. At one point, the character of Francisco d'Anconia asks the character Hank Rearden what sort of advice he would give to Atlas. Rearden is unable to answer, so Francisco gives his own response: "to shrug" (with Atlas being a metaphor for the champions of industry who keep the world in place). The novel includes elements of mystery and science fiction, and it contains Rand's most extensive statement of Objectivism in any of her works of fiction via a lengthy monologue delivered by the strike's leader, John Galt.

The theme of Atlas Shrugged, as Rand described it, is "the role of man's mind in existence." The book explores a number of philosophical themes that Rand would subsequently develop into the philosophy of Objectivism. It advocates the core tenets of Rand's philosophy of Objectivism and expresses her concept of human achievement. In doing so it expresses many facets of Rand's philosophy, such as the advocacy of reason, individualism, the market economy and the failure of government coercion.

Atlas Shrugged received largely negative reviews after its 1957 publication, but achieved enduring popularity and consistent sales in the following decades. In the wake of the late 2000s recession, and the release of the popular videogame Bioshock (a game inspired largely by Rand's theories) sales of Atlas Shrugged have sharply increased, according to The Economist magazine and The New York Times. The Economist reported that the fifty-two-year-old novel ranked #33 among Amazon.com's top-selling books on January 13, 2009. The novel has been seen as highly influential in conservative and libertarian circles.

[/quote]

Ayn Rand ~ Mike Wallace Interview (1959)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ukJiBZ8_4k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMTDaVpBPR0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEruXzQZhNI

~ VF ~

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

My 3 favorites I don't think I could live without.

Lila - Robert M. Pirsig

Ishmael - Daniel Quinn

The God Delusion - Richard Dawkins

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The God Of The Machine ~ by Isabel Paterson

The God Of The Machine ~ by Isabel Paterson

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

The God of the Machine is a book written by Isabel Paterson and published in 1943. At the time of its release, it was considered a cornerstone to the philosophy of individualism. Her biographer Stephen D. Cox (2004) believes Paterson is the "earliest progenitor of libertarianism as we know it today." Ayn Rand wrote in a letter in the 1940s that The God of the Machine "does for capitalism what Das Kapital does for the Reds and what the Bible did for Christianity".

Quote:

"Most of the harm in the world is done by good people, and not by accident, lapse, or omission. It is the result of their deliberate actions, long persevered in, which they hold to be motivated by high ideals toward virtuous ends... ...when millions are slaughtered, when torture is practiced, starvation enforced, oppression made a policy, as at present over a large part of the world, and as it has often been in the past, it must be at the behest of very many good people, and even by their direct action, for what they consider a worthy object." (The God of the Machine)

Representing Isabel Paterson ~ by Stephen Cox

The Ludwig Von Mises Institute Presents ~ Isabel Paterson (Audio)

~ VF ~ 

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Re: Ayn Rand vs. Taibbi: The Lunatics Who Made a Religion Ou

I enjoyed very much reading "Atlas Shrugged" back in the early '90s.  I also very much liked "The Fountainhead" the book and movie.  "Selfishness is a Virtue" has remarkable essays in that book.  Any Rand is very little understood.   I believe Libertarians have  hijacked her as a poster person and don't really understand Objectivism.  She was against thuggery and subjugation.  If she were alive today, I believe she would be against what is happening.

Check out this Taibbi article in which he paints the picture that Ayn Rand's Objectivism is at the core of today's problems.

http://www.alternet.org/story/146611/taibbi%3A_the_lunatics_who_made_a_religion_out_of_greed_and_wrecked_the_economy__

or here http://carolynbaker.net/site/content/view/1617/1/

The one aspect of Objectivism that doesn't work for me is the restricting of gaining information through only the 5 senses.   

Broadspectrum

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

The God Delusion ~ by Richard Dawkins

Front Cover

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

As of January 2010, the English version of The God Delusion had sold over 2 million copies. It was ranked #2 on the Amazon.com bestsellers' list in November 2006.In early December 2006, it reached #4 in the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Best Seller list after nine weeks on the list. It remained on the list for 51 weeks until 30 September 2007. The German version, entitled Der Gotteswahn, had sold over 260,000 copies as of January 28, 2010.

It has attracted widespread commentary, with many books written in response.

~ VF ~

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Vanityfox451
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The Corporation (Film)

The Corporation

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

The Corporation is a 2003 Canadian documentary film written by Joel Bakan, and directed by Mark Achbar and Jennifer Abbott. The documentary is critical of the modern-day corporation, considering its legal status as a class of person and evaluating its behaviour towards society and the world at large as a psychiatrist might evaluate an ordinary person. This is explored through specific examples. The Corporation has been displayed worldwide, on television, and via DVD, file sharing, and free download. Bakan wrote the book, The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power, during the filming of the documentary.

The film was nominated for numerous awards, and won the World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival, 2004, along with a Special Jury Award at the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) in 2003 and 2004.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=989840793835447288&ei=R9jVS6jSOY...

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

"Check out this Taibbi article in which he paints the picture that Ayn Rand's Objectivism is at the core of today's problems."

This poetry by Rudyard Kipling comes to mind after reading that article,

If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

We offer these references on the subject of why the physical health of our nation has worsened ....

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston A. Price (http://www.journeytoforever.org/farm_library/price/pricetoc.html)

Nourishing Traditions Cookbook by Sally Fallon-Morrell with Mary G. Enig

Few people understand that following a heart-healthy, cancer-free, diabetes-free diet means to eat politically incorrect.  The monumental work of Dr. Weston Price in the 1930s on the diets of healthy native peoples the world over remains the premier classic on nutrition.  If the government, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association, and many other prominent "authorities" tell you what to eat, be sure to eat the opposite if you want to live a long and disease-free life.

These websites promote truth in nutrition:

Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation (http://www.ppnf.org/catalog/ppnf/)

The Weston A. Price Foundation (http://www.westonaprice.org/)

A Campaign for Real (Raw) Milk (http://www.realmilk.com/)

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Vanityfox451
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The Trap (Television Documentary Series)

The Trap ~ Television Documentary Series ~ Adam Curtis

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

The Trap: What Happened to Our Dream of Freedom is a BBC documentary series by English filmmaker Adam Curtis, well known for other documentaries including The Century of the Self and The Power of Nightmares. It began airing in the United Kingdom on BBC Two on 11 March 2007.

The series consists of three one-hour programmes which explore the concept and definition of freedom, specifically, "how a simplistic model of human beings as self-seeking, almost robotic, creatures led to today's idea of freedom."

Adam Curtis (born 1955) is a British television documentary maker who has during the course of his television career worked as a writer, producer, director and narrator. He currently works for BBC Current Affairs. His programmes express a clear (and sometimes controversial) opinion about their subject, and he narrates the programmes himself.

"F**k You Buddy"

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=404227395387111085

"The Lonely Robot"

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1087742888040457650

"We Will Force You To Be Free"

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=4486343328817737043

~ VF ~

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Posts: 192
Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

RichardCassie wrote:

We offer these references on the subject of why the physical health of our nation has worsened ....

Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Dr. Weston A. Price (http://www.journeytoforever.org/farm_library/price/pricetoc.html)

Nourishing Traditions Cookbook by Sally Fallon-Morrell with Mary G. Enig

Few people understand that following a heart-healthy, cancer-free, diabetes-free diet means to eat politically incorrect.  The monumental work of Dr. Weston Price in the 1930s on the diets of healthy native peoples the world over remains the premier classic on nutrition.  If the government, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association, and many other prominent "authorities" tell you what to eat, be sure to eat the opposite if you want to live a long and disease-free life.

These websites promote truth in nutrition:

Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation (http://www.ppnf.org/catalog/ppnf/)

The Weston A. Price Foundation (http://www.westonaprice.org/)

A Campaign for Real (Raw) Milk (http://www.realmilk.com/)

Right on, Richard C!  Weston A. Price will help you to survive and thrive.   These dietary guidelines reversed my years of allergies, asthma and cancer.  At 45 yrs old, I have never been healthier.   I wished I had discovered him in my teens.

Other life changers....

Books -

Crossing the Rubicon (This is the roadmap.)

Creature From Jekyll Island

This Time is Different

Monetary Regimes and Inflation

Good to Great

World Made By Hand

Economics in One Easy Lesson

The Alpha Strategy http://www.biorationalinstitute.com/zcontent/alpha_strategy.pdf

How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World.

Web of Debt

The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One.

The Long Walk by Rawicz (an extreme example of resiliance)

Reinventing Collapse by Dmitry Orlov  (Read this 1st then this...) Black Earth: A Journey through Russia After The Fall

Collapse:  How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed

Movies -

Money as Debt

Zeitgeist 1 and 2

What the Bleep Do We Know?

Esoteric Agenda

Idiocracy (It's a comedy that is becoming a documentary.)

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V
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Posts: 849
Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

Hello Paul

Why is this an important book we all should read?

Oh I just got a message from God and he absolutely loved the book.

I have not read the book and have no intention of reading it. I read the preface and from what he wrote in the preface he is confusing God with religion. So I think a better title would have been " The Religion Delusion"  The real problem when intellectuals attempt to discuss God they are missing the central point that God is beyond discussion. It is like trying to hear with your nose. God is not to be proven God is to be experienced and that experience cannot be explained or transferred to anyone else anymore than a person who has never had a headache can understand it without having had one. Not a very important book in my opinion

V

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Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

I'm not sure what the neo-atheist books (Dawkins, Hitchens, Sam Harris) have to do with this website, except perhaps Hitchens' book about Kissinger. I would think we're primarily interested in Economics, Energy, and the Environment. Or am I wrong, is everyone interesting in discussing religion and belief? Just seems like there's plenty of other websites for those kind of discussions.

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Posts: 1636
Re: Important films, books or internet pages we all should ...

V,

I certainly do not want to get into a debate with the use of semantics involving the heading of a book and of what value was gained or not gained by reading just the preface to give conclusion to its worth. I don't want to have discussion in fact, I simply want to compile a series of books, provocative or not, including  such works as 'Island' ~ by Aldous Huxley, that were your Offering to the thread.

In the forward to 'Brave New World' in 1946 for example, there is an outline to 'Island' through his emerging idea's: -

Aldous Huxley wrote:

If I were now to rewrite the book, I would offer the Savage a third alternative. Between the Utopian and primitive horns of his dilemma would lie the possibility of sanity... In this community economics would be decentralist and Henry-Georgian, politics Kropotkinesque co-operative. Science and technology would be used as though, like the Sabbath, they had been made for man, not (as at present and still more so in the Brave New World) as though man were to be adapted and enslaved to them. Religion would be the conscious and intelligent pursuit of man's Final End, the unitive knowledge of immanent Tao or Logos, the transcendent Godhead or Brahman. And the prevailing philosophy of life would be a kind of Higher Utilitarianism, in which the Greatest Happiness principle would be secondary to the Final End principle – the first question to be asked and answered in every contingency of life being: "How will this thought or action contribute to, or interfere with, the achievement, by me and the greatest possible number of other individuals, of man's Final End?

Unfortunately, this thread isn't an 'Island' in and of itself, just a series of compilation, drawing you toward a history of the past that is comparable to the present as parallel's. Looking deep enough, there are signs here of man's beginnings, achievementsinterference and final end. It is a case of looking for them; sometimes in places the angels would fear to tread ...

Here's my dilemma: -

In Post #69

'V' wrote:

Island was Huxley's last book. It is the bookend to Brave New World , pun intended. I recommend both. BTW this is a very difficult book to locate ...

You post Huxley, I've read Huxley, I LOVE Huxley ~ We LOVE HUXLEY ~ I find a copy to read on line ~ "Yay!!!"

Here's my dilemma: -

In Post  #78

Ruhh wrote:

My 3 favorites I don't think I could live without.

Lila - Robert M. Pirsig

Ishmael - Daniel Quinn

The God Delusion - Richard Dawkins

I couldn't find Lila ~ by Robert M. Pirsig, or Ishmael ~ by Daniel Quinn, but I did find The God Delusion ~ by Richard Dawkins ...

... so ...

Ruhh posts Dawkins, I've read Dawkins, I LOVE Dawkins ~ We LOVE Dawkins ~ I find a copy to read on line ~ "BOOO!!!"

Does this all prove that old Abraham Lincoln was right when he said: -

Abraham Lincoln wrote:

"...you can please some of the people all of the time and all of the people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time ..."

I am laughing while I'm writing this by the way, but it's a strange low down guttural laugh, with elements of mania ... Laughing...

~ VF ~

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Vanityfox451
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Mr Smith Goes To Washington (1939)

Now For A Light Intermission: -

Mr Smith Goes To Washington

[quote=]

Wikipedia Review

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is a 1939 American drama film starring James Stewart and Jean Arthur, about one man's effect on American politics. It was directed by Frank Capra, his last film for Columbia Pictures, the studio where he made his name and written by Sidney Buchman, based on Lewis R. Foster's unpublished story.Mr. Smith Goes to Washington was controversial when it was released, but also successful at the box office, and made Stewart a major movie star. The film features a bevy of well-known supporting actors, among them Claude Rains, Edward Arnold, Guy Kibbee, Thomas Mitchell and Beulah Bondi.

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington was nominated for 11 Academy Awards, winning for Best Original Story. In 1989, the Library of Congress added Mr. Smith Goes to Washington to the United States National Film Registry, for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant."

Mr Smith Goes To Washington

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-897129633961255565

~ VF ~

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