Help with Whole House Water Filter Question

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JohnH123's picture
JohnH123
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Help with Whole House Water Filter Question

I'm getting ready to put in a whole house water filter. I have city water. I have chosen to use a tank that takes bulk carbon, and not use any proprietary filters. I believe lots of filter manufacturers will go out of business, so a proprietary filter is not a good idea, in my opinion.

I am considering adding a UV filter, though my plumber says it is useless, as we do not have any need for it with our city water. The carbon filter is about $1,000, and the UV filter adds an additonal $800. I am wondering in a SHTF scenario, if our city water could become contaminated, if there was a shortage of chlorine that the city adds to the water (or other reasons). Perhaps in that case, the city would just shut off the water.

Any educated opinions out there?

Thanks!

tictac1's picture
tictac1
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Posts: 174
Unless you need drinking

Unless you need drinking water from every tap in the house for some reason, you can get better quality water for a lot less money with an under-sink RO system.  With the savings, you could stock up on replacement filters to last you 30 years or so.

I've yet to see a convincing argument for whole-house filtration, especially for a city water user.  Water softening, yes, but even that is a trade off; you will be adding sodium or potassium to your water proportionate to the mineral content of the influent.  We have significant silt in our water, and the only problem it's ever caused is needing to clean out the toilet tanks more often.  We drink and cook with the RO.

eexpo's picture
eexpo
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under sink RO question

Is there a way to hook up an alternate water source other than city water to an existing RO? I think I need only 7psi pressure to make the filter operate.If city water becomes an issue I would like to be able to run another water source through it.(such as stored water that may need filtration.) Any thoughts?

Tycer's picture
Tycer
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eexpo wrote: Is there a way

eexpo wrote:

Is there a way to hook up an alternate water source other than city water to an existing RO? I think I need only 7psi pressure to make the filter operate.If city water becomes an issue I would like to be able to run another water source through it.(such as stored water that may need filtration.) Any thoughts?

A cistern located above the house about 17' would give you roughly 7psi. Remember that RO wastes much water unless you have the recirculating kind.

BSV's picture
BSV
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Water filtration

From long experience I have learned to keep things simple. Why not purchase a Big Berkey filtration system (or a comparable product) with several spare ceramic elements and store it in a closet? Then, should you become nervous about the safety of your municipal water source, you can run the tap water through the gravity flow filtration system before you drink it or cook with it. Should you move someday, you can take it with you.

For the ultimate in simplicity, just boil the water before use if you are concerned whether it is safe to drink. Speaking for myself, I am pretty confident that municipal authorities will do whatever is necessary to ensure a safe water supply, even in a  steadily worsening economic situation. Let's prepare by all means -- but stay in the sunshine. Perhaps our worst fears will not come to pass. That said, we all pretty well know that the status quo cannot continue. Truly, we are living in interesting times.

Tycer's picture
Tycer
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BSV wrote: From long

BSV wrote:

From long experience I have learned to keep things simple. Why not purchase a Big Berkey filtration system (or a comparable product) with several spare ceramic elements and store it in a closet? Then, should you become nervous about the safety of your municipal water source, you can run the tap water through the gravity flow filtration system before you drink it or cook with it. Should you move someday, you can take it with you.

For the ultimate in simplicity, just boil the water before use if you are concerned whether it is safe to drink. Speaking for myself, I am pretty confident that municipal authorities will do whatever is necessary to ensure a safe water supply, even in a  steadily worsening economic situation. Let's prepare by all means -- but stay in the sunshine. Perhaps our worst fears will not come to pass. That said, we all pretty well know that the status quo cannot continue. Truly, we are living in interesting times.

I agree the water will flow, but can we afford it? I pay a pretty high bill each month already. I read on the DD that some water departments will be doubling the price of water this year.

JohnH123's picture
JohnH123
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 Thanks for the input. I

Thanks for the input. I already have several big berkeys, and agree that is the best option should the need arise. So, I will skip the UV filter, though I am still getting the whole house filter, as I like filtered water everywhere. It is also much cheaper doing it that way than using individual filters on showers, bath, etc.

Tycer's picture
Tycer
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Posts: 564
Sawyer whole house filter

https://www.sawyersafetravel2.com/more.asp?pid=217

This is the one I'm buying. Million gallons guaranteed.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
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Posts: 1582
I am glad I looked this

I am glad I looked this thread up - we are buying a whole house filter and I like the one Tycer linked to. Thanks, Tycer/

treemagnet's picture
treemagnet
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safewrite & tycer

I looked at those too and liked what I saw - but what about what they don't catch/remove, which I believe are dissolved solids and so forth.  I think the concept is awesome, but after "they" say it removes 99.99% of bad stuff, I find they mean most of categories of bad stuff.  So, pesticides, insecticides, herbicides, and heavy metals go through.  Also, I thought sawyer didn't make a whole house filter - or are you consider other?  Curious.  Thanks.

Oliveoilguy's picture
Oliveoilguy
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Water Filter

If it we mine, I'd buy a big blue (or similar) 20" housing for about $80.00 including the bracket and get 30 filters at about $20.00 each and maybe put a second housing with a 5/50 micron filter in front of the charcoal to keep it cleaner and changed less often. This should last you a long time. The 20" format is very common and used by WATTS who is the premier water treatment supplier in the world.

Can't see any need for UV.

Good luck.

Oliveoilguy's picture
Oliveoilguy
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Posts: 400
sawyer filter

Tycer wrote:

https://www.sawyersafetravel2.com/more.asp?pid=217

This is the one I'm buying. Million gallons guaranteed.

Check this one out carefully. Maximum pressure in is 40 psi. The lady I spoke with (Susan) said it is more of a point of use filter and not going to give enough pressure on a whole house application. She said that it allows 5000 gpd which equals 3.47 gpm. 

This is NOT a whole house filter.

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1582
Well I just spoke to my

Well I just spoke to my resident tech guru, and he says we are building a whole house filter with parts from Grainger. I guess I can leave that in his capable hands.

I will let you all know how that works out.

chiku's picture
chiku
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Posts: 7
RO also strips may minerals

RO also strips may minerals that we need out of water, so supplements may be nassasary.  Water filtration is very dependant on what is in the water in your area (part of my job is supplying water treatment plants, i know a little bit about them and I am trying to learn as much as I can from the contractors I deal with).  

We have run across a few things, crypto and glardia (sorry I'm sure the spelling is wrong, they cause beaver fever) the UV and chemicals that our WTP uses sterilizes them, which makes the water safe, but it does not remove them.  UV, in my experience works fairly well.  I can get more specific information from work is anyone would like it.  It is limited in what it can do, TDS etc still go thru.  The filters needed to that are very specialized, a near by town is looking in to some, I think by Peerless.  I can't remember how small of particles they take out, but when we had the presentation it was impressive. The one contractor I deal with does plants across Canada and is very experienced, so once he is back in town I will pick his brain.

We have also come across some places with natural sources of arsenic in the water, green sand filters work for that.  If you have arsenic the best thing to do is send away a sample to a manufacturer and they will test and recommend what is best.  

Water softeners are very hard on other parts of your plumbing system.  Since they strip the water of metals/minerals and water natraully wants to get that back they corrode hot water tanks much faster.  Hot water tank manufacturers have actually adjuted their warranty programs because of this.  Eg, our supplier typically warranties for 5 years.  If it fails and new one is installed, the new one also has 5 years warranty.  EXCEPT when there is a softener, then only the original 5 year warranty applies, it is not extended with the nw tank.  If there are other metal products in your system, like an older house with galvanized pipe, that will a corrode much faster.

Another thing that has affected systems we supply is sulphur content and Ph, both can corrode copper and brass within 10 years depending on how extreme they are.  

Also, most municipal plants, at least where I live, do not take out herbicides and pesticides.  Not the best sysems but within government requirements.  It is something to concider as your municipal water may contain those.  

Sorry, I went a little off topic.  Hopefully it helps.

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pnwfilters
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water filters

I think this is the one of the best that i have to buy. i am glad to see this it is the best one

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Arvind Narang
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water purifier for home

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