In Gold we trust.

54 posts / 0 new
Last post
strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: In Gold we trust.

brad wrote:
 The basic premise is that gold backed currency ensures freedom, whereas irredeemable currency fosters enslavement.

I would agree with his premise if most gold was decentralized or in the hands of pleasant governments like the original federal republic of the US used to be.  I don't know if I agree with a gold standard anymore given that 1/3 of all gold is in the hands of central banks whose equity is privately owned, and then the smart money folks believe a good percentage of the rest is in the hands of royal families, the rothschilds, and other financier billionaires (not conspiracy...simple fact of global wealth disparity, and deduction based on how the masses prefer bank credit to real assets, and based on who has the real assets, who controls the mining interests, the LBMA, etc). I don't know specifically how it would affect the system besides their ability to manipulate price and therefore the money supply on a gold standard, but it seems that a disproportional power over gold in the hands of a few rich folks wouldn't be good for the world's 6.7 billion people.

It's amazing what the Fed has done...vacuumed up all bank gold in the US into its own reserves and then later got FDR and Nixon to say "nah, nobody can claim that gold anymore."  Plainly obvious if we just look at the facts of that sentence...the biggest robbery in history.

So I would tend to support a more decentralized commodity standard, or even something un-ownable like the old British tally standard.

switters's picture
switters
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 19 2008
Posts: 743
Re: In Gold we trust.

anarkst,

I am a formal (lay) Zen practitioner as well, so I can relate to and appreciate your sentiments. However, I'd like to highlight the importance of timing and scale in these discussions.  Your objections to money and to gold as money may very well be valid, and in the end both may disappear entirely.  But it seems to me (and many here) that such a transition is unlikely to happen in the next several years, or even in our lifetimes.

In the meantime, folks are trying to figure out how to protect whatever money they may have to protect for their own benefit or the benefit of their families and relations.  One can have a firm grasp of impermanence while still attending to the details of life (chop wood, carry water).  In fact, I would argue that embracing this paradox is a cornerstone of Zen practice.

In this world of ours,
We eat only to cast out,
Sleep only to wake,
And what comes after all that
Is simply to die at last.

Matsuo Basho

ivoryjackal's picture
ivoryjackal
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 88
Re: In Gold we trust.

anarkst wrote:

And I hate to be the one to break this to you, but there aren't any answers.  The endpoint(s) of intellectualism is either insanity or the transcendence to non-intellectualism.  Unfortunately, man almost always chooses the former.

anarkist - you're not bursting any illusions there.  Or really with anything that you're posing.  I'd thought perhaps you had a vision to which you were trying to allow us to argue our way into.  There is no answer to anything, of course, but there's always an answer.  It changes constantly along with the problem.  I'm not familiar per se with the philosophies you follow (not even sure what they are really) but if you seek a form of basic purity, you should be sympathetic with the decisions I've made and are making with my life (and likely a lot of other peoples' here). 

As Aaron says, I'm young yet, and may decide that monetary metals, companionship, friendship, proficiency at chosen skills and an open mind are but fleeting useless things in life, but for now, these are the things I choose to focus on and gather to me in preparation for whatever the future brings.

I agree with Aaron as well that in any future breakdown, metals will be basically valueless (unless there is enough excess production that people start considering trade), but at the moment I need a solution to store the excess of my own labor and it seems one of my more solid options (pun and all).  I'm using the fruits of my labor to aquire skills at the moment, as well, that will help to ensure my access to food and my ability to protect said access given any future outcome.  Haven't been able to buy a whole lot of friends lately, but I'm working on that one, too.

Basically, I'm not really sure what good it does us to consider universal abstracts in the context of everyday realities and their potential future.  I do appreciate the intent of your provocation but fail to see how acknowledging that reality is all an illusion helps with the practicalities of my life.  I'm seriously open to whatever wisdom you can afford us, but doubt you'll be convincing me to sprinkle my silver coins down the street in an exercise of spiritual liberation

Daniel

ivoryjackal's picture
ivoryjackal
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 88
Re: In Gold we trust.

strabes wrote:

brad wrote:
 The basic premise is that gold backed currency ensures freedom, whereas irredeemable currency fosters enslavement.

I would agree with his premise if most gold was decentralized or in the hands of pleasant governments like the original federal republic of the US used to be.  I don't know if I agree with a gold standard anymore given that 1/3 of all gold is in the hands of central banks whose equity is privately owned, and then the smart money folks believe a good percentage of the rest is in the hands of royal families, the rothschilds, and other financier billionaires

Strabes - the thing that scares me the most about any governmental (or banking) control of a gold standard is the lessons they've learned over a couple of centuries of fractional reserve banking and the equivalent habits that the people have learned over the same years (like that paper with numbers on it represent something real).  GATA's research tends to show that the US Fed has probably loaned out a good portion of its gold yet still claims to hold it.  Given that this will allow other reserve banks to do the same, they will all likely play along and accept the US certificates as real ownership.  This inflates supply and, again, allows the miracle transformation of paper into gold that benefits the transformer (and is patently illegal, by threat of violence, for you and I to do).  

I don't have a good solution, but I guess I'm saying I'm with you in a sense that I'm at the least dubious of any potential switch over to a 'gold standard' that pretty much allows people to continue saving digits on a computer, the vulnerabilities of which they don't even begin to understand.  You can't imagine, though, that a decentralized commodity standard (perhaps I'm not sure entirely what you mean) would be any clearer and fairer to the population at large, can you?

anarkst's picture
anarkst
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 1 2009
Posts: 121
Re: In Gold we trust.

Chris,

I would not ever pretend as if I could speak to you on the subject of Zen. 

I do understand that people are very concerned, but as you probably know, the truth (the solution) will reveal itself when we have the courage to open our eyes and see it.

JAG's picture
JAG
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 26 2008
Posts: 2490
Re: In Gold we trust.

Strabes,

I would be interested in hearing your expectations for gold in a deflationary spiral. As I'm sure your aware of, there is a disagreement among the "deflationists". Care to offer some input on this?

Thanks in advanced.

anarkst's picture
anarkst
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 1 2009
Posts: 121
Re: In Gold we trust.

ivoryjackal writes:

I'd thought perhaps you had a vision to which you were trying to allow us to argue our way into.  There is no answer to anything, of course, but there's always an answer.  It changes constantly along with the problem.

The point of my original post was that, as money, gold would not be any better than paper (and perhaps worse, because people thought it possessed some sort of special place in history).

You definitely get the relatively thing.  When you see things in this light, it sort of brings out the absurdity of trying to know anything, i.e., how can you know anything that is constantly changing?

Basically, I'm not really sure what good it does us to consider universal abstracts in the context of everyday realities and their potential future.  I do appreciate the intent of your provocation but fail to see how acknowledging that reality is all an illusion helps with the practicalities of my life.  I'm seriously open to whatever wisdom you can afford us, but doubt you'll be convincing me to sprinkle my silver coins down the street in an exercise of spiritual liberation

I only wish I could offer you wisdom.  I am just challenging your preconceived notions.  The rest is up to you .  And believe me, I am not trying to convince you of anything.  I can't even convince my dog to come in from the backyard!

switters's picture
switters
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 19 2008
Posts: 743
Re: In Gold we trust.

anarkst wrote:

I do understand that people are very concerned, but as you probably know, the truth (the solution) will reveal itself when we have the courage to open our eyes and see it.

We proceed again from the finite and concrete into the abstract and philosophical.  We're not talking about "the truth" or "the solution" in metaphysical or visionary terms.  We're discussing something quite practical.  Let me offer an analog.  Say I decide to buy a bicycle. Several variables enter the decision-making process: how many gears do I need, what size, what style, what manufacturer, what other features, etc.  I do not, when making such a decision, contemplate the inherent nature of bicycles, their role in history as vehicles or the likelihood of whether bicycles will still exist a hundred or two hundred years into the future.

In a similar vein, while it is certainly intellectually stimulating to consider the nature of money and prognosticate on its trajectory in the distant future, this thread is dedicated to a much more banal question: what is likely to happen to the price of gold in the next several years?  It really is as simple and mundane as that.  

For the record, I enjoy the kind of philosophical discourse you wish to engage us in.  I'm just pointing out that it's not particularly relevant to this thread.

Farmer Brown's picture
Farmer Brown
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 23 2008
Posts: 1501
Re: In Gold we trust.

Strabes wrote:
I would agree with his premise if most gold was decentralized or in the hands of pleasant governments like the original federal republic of the US used to be.  I don't know if I agree with a gold standard anymore given that 1/3 of all gold is in the hands of central banks whose equity is privately owned, and then the smart money folks believe a good percentage of the rest is in the hands of royal families, the rothschilds, and other financier billionaires (not conspiracy...simple fact of global wealth disparity, and deduction based on how the masses prefer bank credit to real assets, and based on who has the real assets, who controls the mining interests, the LBMA, etc). I don't know specifically how it would affect the system besides their ability to manipulate price and therefore the money supply on a gold standard, but it seems that a disproportional power over gold in the hands of a few rich folks wouldn't be good for the world's 6.7 billion people.

Strabes,

What difference does it make where most of the gold is right now?  If we decide to use gold as legal tender to the exclusivity of all other things, then don't producers have to be paid in gold?  If the person holding all the gold does not produce, he must spend to survive and thereby transfer gold to producers.  

This brings to light yet another way of looking at the fiat money problem.  In fiat money, the central bank holds all the money at the beginning, but they never have to produce anything because they never run out of money.  The centralized fiat money system reflects the impossibility of producers ever achieving monetary parity with the originators of money to a "T", whereas with gold, I cannot see how producers do not end up with their respective share of gold.  

Anarkst:  I have not studied Eastern philosophy, but I am always impressed with the ring of truth I feel when I hear any part of it and hopefully someday I will study it.  Like others have said though, I fail to see the point of it in this discussion.

anarkst's picture
anarkst
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 1 2009
Posts: 121
Re: In Gold we trust.

Chris writes:

We proceed again from the finite and concrete into the abstract and philosophical.  We're not talking about "the truth" or "the solution" in metaphysical or visionary terms.  We're discussing something quite practical.  Let me offer an analog.  Say I decide to buy a bicycle. Several variables enter the decision-making process: how many gears do I need, what size, what style, what manufacturer, what other features, etc.  I do not, when making such a decision, contemplate the inherent nature of bicycles, their role in history as vehicles or the likelihood of whether bicycles will still exist a hundred or two hundred years into the future.

But regardless of how many gears it has, what size it is, who the manufacturer is, or whether it is blue or red, you still sit on the saddle and push the peddles.

In a similar vein, while it is certainly intellectually stimulating to consider the nature of money and prognosticate on its trajectory in the distant future, this thread is dedicated to a much more banal question: what is likely to happen to the price of gold in the next several years?  It really is as simple and mundane as that.  

For the record, I enjoy the kind of philosophical discourse you wish to engage us in.  I'm just pointing out that it's not particularly relevant to this thread.

I am not really attempting to be philosophic, and my interests do not lie in attempting to predict the future.   

strabes's picture
strabes
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 7 2009
Posts: 1032
Re: In Gold we trust.

ivoryjackal - I share your distrust of whatever monetary standard is used, so no I don't think a more decentralized commodity would guarantee fairness.  the only thing I meant by decentralized is a commodity that is less centrally held, for example silver since it's an industrial metal.  I've heard others recommend a basket of commodities. but I haven't researched this topic, so I'm generally talking out of my gluteus.  perhaps the only thing I would trust is if the empire government stands down and local communities go back to bartering and using their own sound currencies...that's true decentralization...I hate the idea of centralized monetary authorities coming up with anything.  but I specifically get nervous when people recommend a gold standard given the centralized control in the hands of the very people/institutions that have run us into the ground already.

JAG - in my opinion gold has to decline a bit when the next phase of the collapse occurs and drives people toward illiquidity or even insolvency. this will force them to sell assets in order to 1) payoff debt and/or 2) get cash to buy what they need to survive.  many people won't have the luxury of keeping paper gold in ETFs.  having said that, a good advisor in switzerland I pay attention to says price is irrelevant at this point and we better get some bullion in safe offshore vaults before the US shuts down offshore asset flows.  they may be right. so my view is that gold for insurance purposes (held by you directly or in vaults) should be acquired regardless of price whereas if you're buying for speculative/hedge purposes I think a better price is coming.  

Patrick - I believe you're right that gold would accrue to the producers in a regular gold standard.  my guess is that's why we probably won't see that type of system--I'm convinced the financiers of the world are going to keep their gold.  I'm afraid if anything they'll setup a false gold standard where they keep it all in their vaults and then give people electronic digits supposedly tied to gold but all anyone ever sees is the bankcard that gets credited/debited...seems just as manipulatable as what we have now. 

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2318
Re: In Gold we trust.

Anarkst

Quote:
I was making reference to your comment that, "gold always..." 

Ahh! "Always" in the historical context... certainly not a future projection.
Thank you for the elaboration.

Also, I'm not sure if you realize this, but even though you're meeting a lot of "resistance" on some of your concepts, this is the exact type of conversation we need. Polite, intelligent dischord ;)

So, that said, thank you kindly for the interesting thread and excellent conversation.

Cheers,

Aaron

switters's picture
switters
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 19 2008
Posts: 743
Re: In Gold we trust.

strabes wrote:

JAG - in my opinion gold has to decline a bit when the next phase of the collapse occurs and drives people toward illiquidity or even insolvency. this will force them to sell assets in order to 1) payoff debt and/or 2) get cash to buy what they need to survive.  many people won't have the luxury of keeping paper gold in ETFs.  having said that, a good advisor in switzerland I pay attention to says price is irrelevant at this point and we better get some bullion in safe offshore vaults before the US shuts down offshore asset flows.  they may be right. so my view is that gold for insurance purposes (held by you directly or in vaults) should be acquired regardless of price whereas if you're buying for speculative/hedge purposes I think a better price is coming.  

In another thread here on CM.com Stoneleigh from The Automatic Earth raised this concern about holding gold for anything but the long term:

At some point gold ownership is likely to be made illegal, as it was during the depression, which doesn't stop you from owning it, but would make it very difficult to exchange for essentials. This is why you would have to be fairly sure you wouldn't need it for a while.

If it is difficult (i.e. illegal) to sell gold for cash, that could pose a problem for those of us wishing to use it as a safe place to stash money we're going to need access to for necessities.

anarkst's picture
anarkst
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 1 2009
Posts: 121
Re: In Gold we trust.

Also, I'm not sure if you realize this, but even though you're meeting a lot of "resistance" on some of your concepts, this is the exact type of conversation we need. Polite, intelligent dischord ;)

Aaron,

This is a wonderful group of people.  I thank you (pl) for letting me in.  I know I can come across as overly confident (perhaps arrogant), but what I have always told people over the years is that my perceived confidence comes not from what I know, but instead from what I know I can not know.  Freedom from 'knowing' is quite liberating.  That way, you're never wrong .

Highly intellectual people have a tendency to get super-attached to ideas.  A  Zen teacher created this wonderful metaphor concerning our predisposition to attachment.  He said, and I paraphrase, that living everyday life is like being on a train where we observe the passage of life.  All of a sudden, something catches our eye (perhaps a beautiful woman, a fancy car, an irresistible idea) and we feel compelled to get off the train in order to explore this object.  Well, the train has moved on, and there we are setting ourselves up for the inevitable suffering that must occur when the object of our fancy disappears.  Only then do we realize the illusion.

If you buy into the concept that all things come and go, your status as an observer solidifies, and your mind can remain open to the ever changing conditions that is life.  I believe, as Chris so eloquently presents, that we are in a period of tumultuous change.  It has never been more important to be completely open so that one can roll with the punches and be OK with whatever life becomes.

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1372
Re: In Gold we trust.

Chris K,

Even if the gov't decides that gold ownership be illegal, there will still be a black market.  In fact, if that happens I would imagine the value of gold will go up quite a bit.  That being said, this is one reason that you should be diversified into Silver and maybe some Platinum as well.  I'm not a huge fan of Palladium as it's purely a industrial metal unlike the other three.  Although, it is priced pretty low right now and if/when the turn around occurs it will still be wanted/needed so profits could be quite good.

But again, I don't see gold being made illegal due to the fact that at this time probably only 5% of Americans actually own gold/bullion.  Much different that in the 30's in which gold was still circulating as currency throughout the world.  Now, a large tax on the sale of gold could happen.  But again, most gold transactions could be made under the table as they are now. 

ivoryjackal's picture
ivoryjackal
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 88
Re: In Gold we trust.

strabes wrote:

perhaps the only thing I would trust is if the empire government stands down and local communities go back to bartering and using their own sound currencies...that's true decentralization...I hate the idea of centralized monetary authorities coming up with anything.  but I specifically get nervous when people recommend a gold standard given the centralized control in the hands of the very people/institutions that have run us into the ground already.

When I say 'free market money' I mean something to this effect - no federal mandate that closes the barter discussion down to one medium that is accountable and taxable.

As much as I'm an anarchist at heart, I don't believe I'll live to see the day where there is no singular overriding government (or equivalent power structure, though bankers' powers are facilitated by the gummint's laws) and *the* big problem with free market money is that the gov't won't get its due of the commerce, which, of course, gets their minds working like nothing else ever could.  That said, I think I may live to see the day when our empire breaks down into regional or even state level governments (after the tower has been built too high), and smaller more local economies, in my idealized imagination at least, will tend to be fairer all around.

ivoryjackal's picture
ivoryjackal
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 10 2008
Posts: 88
Re: In Gold we trust.

LogansRun wrote:

That being said, this is one reason that you should be diversified into Silver and maybe some Platinum as well.  I'm not a huge fan of Palladium as it's purely a industrial metal unlike the other three.  Although, it is priced pretty low right now and if/when the turn around occurs it will still be wanted/needed so profits could be quite good.

Logans

Though your advice here is certainly good, I kind of want to keep you honest and point out that in terms of diversity you've really only offered up monetary metals (and maybe an industrial metal).  I'm down with you all the way as for future vision and even investment strategy, but when talking diversity there are lots of other things people can spend their excess on which would constitute solid investments.

Examples - your home or living environment, including food and water storage for blackouts, bank holidays and what not.  Education:  learn self defense, learn cpr, use your frn's to support yourself for a year or so while you volunteer on a farm or for the local ambulance.  Where education is valuable, experience is priceless.  Ammunition:  talking metals, you're investing in copper, tin and lead all in one purchase.  And this one will allow you to barter for food in more ways than one (I mean hunting, not anything else someone might think up).

If you've got enough excess, I might even suggest a thousand or three in an s&p500 fund.  Hey, you never know - you can't win if you don't play. [Sarcasm there if it's not clear, but tinged with the caveat that you should consider that we may all be wrong, deluded, off base.  Hubris before the fall warns us just not to be *too* sure]

Daniel

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1372
Re: In Gold we trust.

Daniel,

I agree.  But diversification in PM's is what I was talking about.  As far as diversification in your life/living, that's a whole 'nother issue.  I will disagree on the S&P thing though.  I have ZERO use for the Stock Market at this time.  The manipulation that's taking place is disgusting and you must remember, you're going against the casino.  Not many people beat them, and they just get richer.  But again, it's your money....not mine.  I prefer long duration foods, land, garden stuffs, educational products, ammo, alternative power supplies, etc......

Cheers!

Brad's picture
Brad
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 10 2009
Posts: 25
Re: In Gold we trust.

LogansRun wrote:

I prefer long duration foods, land, garden stuffs, educational products, ammo, alternative power supplies, etc...... 

LogansRun,

An extremely thoughtful list!

Funny thing is...a few months back, before work picked up again,..I sold some of my PMs to buy dirt! I live about an hour over a mountain from the nearest Home Depot, and I must have made six or seven trips with my truck bed loaded almost down onto the axel.

Recently, I've cleaned out some big compost bins that were overgrow in the back alley, and all veggie-matter is now getting buried there for my future dirt needs!

Thank goodness for this cheap-oil anomaly that's helping me to get going!

Brad

Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. -Scott Adams

idoctor's picture
idoctor
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 4 2008
Posts: 1731
Re: In Gold we trust.

Where education is valuable, experience is priceless.  Ammunition:  talking metals, you're investing in copper, tin and lead all in one purchase.  And this one will allow you to barter for food in more ways than one (I mean hunting, not anything else someone might think up).

If you've got enough excess, I might even suggest a thousand or three in an s&p500 fund.  Hey, you never know - you can't win if you don't play. [Sarcasm there if it's not clear, but tinged with the caveat that you should consider that we may all be wrong, deluded, off base.  Hubris before the fall warns us just not to be *too* sure]

Daniel good points. This may not be as bad as we think it could be (although it logically looks horrible) & need to keep this in our thoughts as a possibility. Nothing has ever made me act like this crisis has so in some ways I wonder about myself. Am I just being too pessimistic & just older & paranoid now? Y2K, 911 the tech bubble the S&L crises etc really didn't make me think in survival mode but somehow this one has. Then throw in the current administrations anti-business socialistic agenda & I feel it is warranted.

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 29 2008
Posts: 1813
Re: In Gold we trust.

idoctor wrote:

Where education is valuable, experience is priceless.  Ammunition:  talking metals, you're investing in copper, tin and lead all in one purchase.  And this one will allow you to barter for food in more ways than one (I mean hunting, not anything else someone might think up).

If you've got enough excess, I might even suggest a thousand or three in an s&p500 fund.  Hey, you never know - you can't win if you don't play. [Sarcasm there if it's not clear, but tinged with the caveat that you should consider that we may all be wrong, deluded, off base.  Hubris before the fall warns us just not to be *too* sure]

Daniel good points. This may not be as bad as we think it could be (although it logically looks horrible) & need to keep this in our thoughts as a possibility. Nothing has ever made me act like this crisis has so in some ways I wonder about myself. Am I just being too pessimistic & just older & paranoid now? Y2K, 911 the tech bubble the S&L crises etc really didn't make me think in survival mode but somehow this one has. Then throw in the current administrations anti-business socialistic agenda & I feel it is warranted.

Hiya IDoc;

You're OK . . . It's the rest of the world that's crazy. . . . Normally this would be a joke, but not this time . . . .

LogansRun's picture
LogansRun
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Mar 18 2009
Posts: 1372
Re: In Gold we trust.

C1oudfire wrote:

idoctor wrote:

Where education is valuable, experience is priceless.  Ammunition:  talking metals, you're investing in copper, tin and lead all in one purchase.  And this one will allow you to barter for food in more ways than one (I mean hunting, not anything else someone might think up).

If you've got enough excess, I might even suggest a thousand or three in an s&p500 fund.  Hey, you never know - you can't win if you don't play. [Sarcasm there if it's not clear, but tinged with the caveat that you should consider that we may all be wrong, deluded, off base.  Hubris before the fall warns us just not to be *too* sure]

Daniel good points. This may not be as bad as we think it could be (although it logically looks horrible) & need to keep this in our thoughts as a possibility. Nothing has ever made me act like this crisis has so in some ways I wonder about myself. Am I just being too pessimistic & just older & paranoid now? Y2K, 911 the tech bubble the S&L crises etc really didn't make me think in survival mode but somehow this one has. Then throw in the current administrations anti-business socialistic agenda & I feel it is warranted.

Hiya IDoc;

You're OK . . . It's the rest of the world that's crazy. . . . Normally this would be a joke, but not this time . . . .

I second that!  We're the sane ones....hehehecacklecackle

tylerjordan's picture
tylerjordan
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 29 2009
Posts: 10
Re: In Gold we trust.

Found this interesting question on <HowStuffWorks.com>.

"If you took all of the gold in the world and put it in one place how much would there be?." 01 April 2000. HowStuffWorks.com. <http://money.howstuffworks.com/question213.htm> 18 August 2009.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments