Emergency Food

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Mozy's picture
Mozy
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Emergency Food

What do people reccomend for emergnency food?   Do you have pre-packaged stuff you reccomend?

txgirl69's picture
txgirl69
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for starters

Welcome to the CM community!

I'm not sure if you're asking for specific food items or manufacturers/distributors.... We have taste tested a lot of the stuff Iisted below, just to be sure what to expect....

Mountain House, Provident Pantry, Alpine Aire and eFoods - all of these are quality, pre-packaged, just add water, products. eFoods has a small line of products, but the quality of food is probably much higher than the others.... I'm sure there are some I'm forgetting....

We also buy canned butter, cheese and clarified butter (cooking grease in shelf stable form) and Yoder's canned meats. I also have another brand, can't remember the name, from Pleasant Hill Grain.

I don't know how some people feel about it, but based on my research and calling up food companies, I've added many grocery store cans of foods - chili, tamales, favorite soups, fruits and veggies that don't grow in my area, smoked oysters and canned tuna - you name it....

I have an Excalibur dehydrator that I love :) Last year I stored dried tomatoes, peppers, apple rings, apricots and plums - nom, nom, nom!!

We have several 5 gallon buckets with wheat kernels, pasta, beans and rice - the latter 3 bought at a grocery store and packaged by us at home.

Hope this helps get you started - if there is something you really like to eat, don't be afraid to buy some of it and store it - and always remember, First In/First Out rotation!!

~ Rita

ewilkerson's picture
ewilkerson
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Emergency Essencials has

Emergency Essencials has better prices on some of the same products. 

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
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Supplement Pre-Packaged with Long Term Food Storage

Mozy -

Pre-packaged is good to have but you should also have a stock of food stores for the 10-15 year long term.

Check here for info:

Food Storage Planning

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/emergency-preparation-and-food-storage-info-lowesville-seminar/18845

Food Storage Execution

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/successful-food-storage-day-9-familes-4-tons-5-hours-lessons-learned-recommendations/27519

Food Storage Project Lessons Learned

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/food-storage-lessons-learned-and-recomendations/19518

Other good preparation info here:

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/consolidated-list-links-existing-preparation-threads/27912

Poet's picture
Poet
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1 Month Food Storage Supply

Another thread:

1 Month Food Storage Supply
http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/1-month-food-storage-supply/51303

Poet

Mozy's picture
Mozy
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 Thanks for all the tips!

Thanks for all the tips!

flyattic's picture
flyattic
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 Rice, peanut butter,

Rice, peanut butter, honey. Those are my big three big

Also i would get yourself the best foraging book you can find for your country

In the UK this is about the best book you can get

http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Forager-Handbook-Miles-Irving/dp/0091913632/...

and you'll need a good portable identifying book as a companion

It makes one much less worried when you're clued into the wild edbiles around you. Nettle pesto,beer,soup,tea is a good source of many needed vitamins. I'd put good foraging and identifying skills way ahead of a stock of food. If your serious about the whole preping thing then good viable seed of things like potatoes, runner beans,onions, challotes, garlic and turnips are your best bet due to ease of growing.  I'd recommend getting some Sea Kale and Sea Beet in there too if you're reasonably near the coast. 

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Consider the Mormons

Mozy

I followed Adam's path and was very pleased.

http://www.peakprosperity.com/blog/food-storage-dummies/55478

Travlin 

 

Full Moon's picture
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Walmart has you covered now

http://www.americanpreppersnetwork.net/viewtopic.php?f=384&t=9716
 

http://www.augasonfarms.com/ 
 

DenisKorn's picture
DenisKorn
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Emergency products and expert information

For reliable and expert advice and guidelines on preparedness planning I highly recommend my preparedness Blog.  I have 37 years experence in this industry!

http://learntoprepare.com

The 12 Crucial Questions of Preparedness Planning This is one of the most important articles available on preparedness for the serious planner

For products - especially food go to http://www.preparedirect.com

Recommended articles include:

Why I recommend AlpineAire Foods

Why Gourmet Reserves

Beginning and Improving Preparedness Planning  There are links in this article to other valuable articles

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Canned goods are good for 10

Canned goods are good for 10 yrs.

Easy start is to buy an extra case of vegetables, dried fruit, peanut butter or tuna fish a week.  Whatever is on sale. you will have a good supply of food in no time.

You can start canning and go with the 20 year freeze dried stuff, but I think it is just a lot easier to buy stuff at your local grocery store or Sam's while it is on sale .  Don't make a big deal out of it. start small and build.

If you start talking about 40yr storage and those kind of logistics, you are probably better off getting guns and artillary and just taking everyone elses food.  (just kidding)  I plan on being one of the zombies, so watch out!

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 I Agree 40 year storage is

I Agree 40 year storage is a waste of time. If you can't grow your own food for 40 years I'm guessing the planet isnt going to be much fun to be on anyway. I just keep about 3 months extra basic food in stock and rotate it every week. 3 months is easily enough to get yourself sorted and find sustainable sources of food. Knowledge is more powerful than stocks of food.

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flyattic wrote:  I Agree 40

flyattic wrote:

I Agree 40 year storage is a waste of time. If you can't grow your own food for 40 years I'm guessing the planet isnt going to be much fun to be on anyway. I just keep about 3 months extra basic food in stock and rotate it every week. 3 months is easily enough to get yourself sorted and find sustainable sources of food. Knowledge is more powerful than stocks of food.

Nobody is talking about storing 40 years worth of food.  We were talking about storing food that will last at least 10-15, more likely 30, possibly longer.

It's in the buckets, it's in mylar, it will sustain 4 adults with the minimum nutritional requirements for a year.  I hope to never need it - it's like an insurance policy.

And as such, worrying about a source of food is now out of mind.

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Dogs_In_A_Pile

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

flyattic wrote:

I Agree 40 year storage is a waste of time. If you can't grow your own food for 40 years I'm guessing the planet isnt going to be much fun to be on anyway. I just keep about 3 months extra basic food in stock and rotate it every week. 3 months is easily enough to get yourself sorted and find sustainable sources of food. Knowledge is more powerful than stocks of food.

Nobody is talking about storing 40 years worth of food.  We were talking about storing food that will last at least 10-15, more likely 30, possibly longer.

It's in the buckets, it's in mylar, it will sustain 4 adults with the minimum nutritional requirements for a year.  I hope to never need it - it's like an insurance policy.

And as such, worrying about a source of food is now out of mind.

Ah yes i actually realised that after I posted. I apologise for my gaff, whoops. But still, I would put foraging skills far ahead of food stocks (even if they last 40 years) . You have to remember that many people just can't afford the huge amounts of cash you need for that freeze dried goop (i looked into it). I can quite happily live out the year living off wild edibles and some stored potatoes and winter squash for the winter months. Learning bushcraft is far more empowering and useful in any kind of situation In my humble opinion. I heartily recommend it. 

ao's picture
ao
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the ultimate weight loss program

flyattic wrote:

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

flyattic wrote:

I Agree 40 year storage is a waste of time. If you can't grow your own food for 40 years I'm guessing the planet isnt going to be much fun to be on anyway. I just keep about 3 months extra basic food in stock and rotate it every week. 3 months is easily enough to get yourself sorted and find sustainable sources of food. Knowledge is more powerful than stocks of food.

Nobody is talking about storing 40 years worth of food.  We were talking about storing food that will last at least 10-15, more likely 30, possibly longer.

It's in the buckets, it's in mylar, it will sustain 4 adults with the minimum nutritional requirements for a year.  I hope to never need it - it's like an insurance policy.

And as such, worrying about a source of food is now out of mind.

Ah yes i actually realised that after I posted. I apologise for my gaff, whoops. But still, I would put foraging skills far ahead of food stocks (even if they last 40 years) . You have to remember that many people just can't afford the huge amounts of cash you need for that freeze dried goop (i looked into it). I can quite happily live out the year living off wild edibles and some stored potatoes and winter squash for the winter months. Learning bushcraft is far more empowering and useful in any kind of situation In my humble opinion. I heartily recommend it. 

Foraging skills are definitely valuable but, if, for example, there is nuclear, biological, or chemical contamination of your local foraging spots, you're SOL if you don't have any access to stored foods.  I've got decent plant foraging skills and have eaten that way for brief periods of time but after a year of eating that way, I'd disappear if I turned sideways.  I'll either need to kill something with blood in it or have stored food stocks to survive.  YMMV, 

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Hmmmmmm, let's see........

......... foraging for food, or stockpiling food, or growing food in the ground or raising food (as ao says) 'with blood in it'?   How about All Of The Above? That oughtta do it.

flyattic's picture
flyattic
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 yep, thats what I'm doing.

yep, thats what I'm doing. (barring the livestock, you're opening a can of worms there)

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Hiding Food Thread

Time to mention the other thread about Hiding Food, which also includes a discussion on why hunting may not be the best idea...

Hiding Food
http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/hiding-food/53143

Poet

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Food storage...

WIthout knowing where you live, let me give you a little local history.

During the Great Depression, there were around 25,000 people in my county. The deer herds were in prime condition as was the other wild food stocks. Heck, we still had two of the local tribes migrating with the herd, my neighbor is old enough to remember it and tell me the stories.

So at the end of the Great Depression, the herd had been decimated. Disease had set in and the overhunting had damaged the genetic diversity to the point where other animals eventually had to be brought in to save the herd.

Today there are 85,000 people in my county, the Feds/State have prevented mountain lion and severely restricted other predator hunting, all the while issuing the same amount or more deer hunting licenses. The results speak for themselves here, there will be no wildlife to support a human population within 180 days of a disaster that stops the trucks rolling. And this is within an hour of Yosemite National Park.

If things go bad, people will scatter about like locusts, consuming everything in their path, in total ignorance of the Native American systems for preventing the outright destruction of the life cycle.

Without some food storage, we would not have a chance. I imagine the state of nature and lack of human population in your area would have to be much better than mine for you to feel that you can forage effectively long term, without depleting resources. Native Americans migrated to prevent localized resource depletion, so I am not sure how things have changed, in light of our nationwide and global population explosion, to make nature more resilient and capable of supporting human life than it has been historically.

Just Sayin.

Jager06

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 You would be amazed

You would be amazed at 

a) the amount of wild edibles around. (i'm talking plants here, not animals. we can live without meat, leave the meat for the yahoos with their rifles)

b) How little people know about what is and what isn't edible. There are still enough ultra poisonous plants around to scare the sh*t out of people and stop them just randomly eating stuff.

Point taken, I do live in the countryside and I know exactly where all the local wild edibles spring up each year. But if you're still in the city then you're f*cked if your storing food or not. Gangs of teens would invade every house they could, they're even more likely to make you a target if you have defenses and stockpiles (as shown to the outside world by your lack of coming out of the house). This is all obviously a what if, worst case scenario as collapse is more likely to be a slow process (or so I'm constantly told)

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flyattic wrote:  You would

flyattic wrote:

You would be amazed at 

a) the amount of wild edibles around. (i'm talking plants here, not animals. we can live without meat, leave the meat for the yahoos with their rifles)

b) How little people know about what is and what isn't edible. There are still enough ultra poisonous plants around to scare the sh*t out of people and stop them just randomly eating stuff.

Point taken, I do live in the countryside and I know exactly where all the local wild edibles spring up each year. But if you're still in the city then you're f*cked if your storing food or not. Gangs of teens would invade every house they could, they're even more likely to make you a target if you have defenses and stockpiles (as shown to the outside world by your lack of coming out of the house). This is all obviously a what if, worst case scenario as collapse is more likely to be a slow process (or so I'm constantly told)

The ability to forage for food, while certainly important, is an order of magnitude less important than the ability to find a source of fresh water or purify water.

In three days the "gangs of teens" will likely be near dead.  But fresh water was covered in another thread.

Just found a dwarf fig this weekend - it is now in my backyard along with everything else we grow and eat year round.  It will supplement the 6 month storage of rotating stocked food.  Which is insured by a year's worth of long term stored food.

Bnewfield's picture
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Take emergency food storage into your own hands!

More often than not, the government is not equipped to provide adequate food and water for every person, as we saw in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. This isn't limited to the US, either... Did you know that after the great Kobe earthquake in Japan, the Japanese mafia was out delivering food and blankets THREE DAYS BEFORE the government did anything at all? I built a stockpile of food (enough to keep my wife, two kids, and myself well fed for one year) It wasn't easy, but this article helped:

http://www.martiallawusa.com/wp/?p=37

Any wise person would start storing food NOW. You can do it for not much money; it's really not hard. In times like these, you can't afford NOT to!

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Welcome, Bnewfield

Wecome to the community. Interesting comment about the Japanses mafia providing food and blankets ahead of the government after teh great Kobe earthquke. What was your source for that information? (Not doubting you; just interested.)

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flyattic
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Dogs_In_A_Pile

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

flyattic wrote:

You would be amazed at 

a) the amount of wild edibles around. (i'm talking plants here, not animals. we can live without meat, leave the meat for the yahoos with their rifles)

b) How little people know about what is and what isn't edible. There are still enough ultra poisonous plants around to scare the sh*t out of people and stop them just randomly eating stuff.

Point taken, I do live in the countryside and I know exactly where all the local wild edibles spring up each year. But if you're still in the city then you're f*cked if your storing food or not. Gangs of teens would invade every house they could, they're even more likely to make you a target if you have defenses and stockpiles (as shown to the outside world by your lack of coming out of the house). This is all obviously a what if, worst case scenario as collapse is more likely to be a slow process (or so I'm constantly told)

The ability to forage for food, while certainly important, is an order of magnitude less important than the ability to find a source of fresh water or purify water.

In three days the "gangs of teens" will likely be near dead.  But fresh water was covered in another thread.

Just found a dwarf fig this weekend - it is now in my backyard along with everything else we grow and eat year round.  It will supplement the 6 month storage of rotating stocked food.  Which is insured by a year's worth of long term stored food.

Probably true in your area. Where I live you can't move without tripping over clean water. Thus highlighting the fact that i suppose there is really no correct answer. How i would prepare here has nothing to do with how someone would prepare in NYC. 

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