Community Building

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Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
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Re: Community Building

Yes this is what one of my children are  , tenants on a farm .   They get free house and utilities to do the morning and night chores ,and on weekend when they are home from work they help with  round up ,branding , calving and such . They are given a beef per year and get to keep their own animals there as well.   Keeps the critters from invading the place too .

Really works well .

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The New Paltz CM events and its Community-creating effect

Hey all --

As most of you know, 6 friends and I are putting together two appearances by Dr. Chris here in New Paltz, NY (two weeks from now).  I just wanted to make a quick post to note how putting together the events is fostering community.

First off, the obvious effect is that the 7 of us have gotten a lot closer over the last 8 months during the planning and pushing forward with all the tasks that go into such an undertaking.  For the most part it's all been very smooth, but I must say I have new or deeper respect for everybody in our little gang.  Listening to them talk about why the events are important to them has also helped me better understand my reasons for it.  

Certainly on one level I just want everyone in my geographic area to have exposure to CM & the CC, but now as we enter the home stretch towards the events, I get that -- since not everyone in the area will come and not everyone who does will understand or be ready to digest the message -- that what I'm really doing is casting a net for Like Minded Conspirators that will want to collaborate going forward (on whatever jobs:  creating deeper community ties, sustainable agriculture, green architecture, etc.).  I'm even thinking >gulp< that I'm going to get involved in local politics one way or another.  (The very thought of which gives me hives, but that's where much of the rubber meets the road on all the issues we're up against.)

And so out of this magnum opus of ours I hope to locate even just a few solid, grounded, motivated and reliable individuals to carry the effort forward.

Another more subtle effect of the planning on community ties has been the creation/renewal/extension of the interpersonal network created by the 7 of us.  We're finding that between us we know a heck of a lot of people and that the warp and weft of the network around here is strong and wide.  We're connecting individuals in ways that haven't been possible before (since I know persons X, Y and Z but not A, B, and C [who know this guy Rob in the group] -- but now Rob & I know ABCXYZ and they all have the opportunity to connect with each other as well).  And I'm coming to appreciate how this is a very real form of wealth -- one more valuable than fiat currency for sure at some point before long!

And then the biggest part of the Community Building effect we hope for will arise out of the events themselves.  Certainly strong connections will be made at the Sunday seminar among the folks that attend.  But at the Saturday night lecture we're letting any group or business -- that can reasonably connect their mission to ours/that of the CC -- to set up a table in the lobby outside the big honkin' lecture hall Dr. Chris will be giving his talk in.  They can network, dish out literature, collect e-mails, whatever.  But I have high hopes that we'll get all sorts of individuals and groups in the same space at the same time and, say, the folks who agitate for a clean Hudson River will bump up against the local Farmer's Organization and they'll make some connection or come to understand they have some common cause.  That potential cross-pollination is very exciting to me.

So -- just a few thoughts on a Sunday evening.  Gotta git:  the chicken I've got roasting in the oven smells like its ready.

Viva -- Sager

P.S.  I've also got an update on the Homestead but that'll have to wait until next time.

nb:  edited for clarity

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Re: Community Building

Good for you Sager ,    After my eye opening trip into the city this week , I  see why you  have  a huge task before you and the potential of being in a desperate situation if  any kind of shit hits the fan .  All stacked up and not knowing everyone around you  leaves you quit vulnerable.   Anyway good for you to find some like minded fellowship and good for to finding a community to move to .  It amazes me where one might find like minded people there at all .   What is the chance you run into anyone you know at the grocery store or gas station .    We are worlds different out here for sure .   If I run into some one I do NOT know that is cause for inquiry .

I am frustrated  some  ...thought we were taking a baby step forward and gave up the SUV for a minivan . Well we  get a whoppin  3 more miles to the gallon and can't haul diddly in it .  Leaves me feeling  uncomfortably close to the ground and  quite vulnerable .   I may just have to justify the fact that we do not go very many miles in a year and go back to the suv . until we can not afford  the gas any longer .

Have a good week , I hope you get your little community together .

FM

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The Distributed Village

Maybe 2 months ago I half-jokingly referred to the idea of the "Distributed Village" -- a community of people who are cooperatively engaged in surfing the waves of upheaval in our economy/society, but who do not necessarily share tight geographic proximity.

The maximalist in me wants to find 10 families and buy land together and build straw bale/cob/rammed earth/whatever houses with our bare hands, to undertake forest and raised-bed gardening both, to have dozens and dozens of PV panels ensconced with a fine Southern exposure, windmills pumping water into ponds/cisterns uphill of the residences for gravity-flow plumbing...you know, the basic soup-to-nuts post-SHTF Shangri-la.  La-la-la.

Of course, seeing as how neither I nor anyone in my community have won a recent Lotto jackpot, nor is anybody's last name Gates, Buffet or Bloomberg, the maximalist vision may take a little while.  There is also high skepticism within my social circle as to whether such SHTFangri-La is doable from a "people probably don't know how to function in that kind of setup" -- questions of governance, finance, people leaving or joining, etc.  IMO that's Denial & Fear talking, and eventually (assuming things get as hair-raising as I think they will), those sorts of objections will begin to loom less large in folks' minds.

The pragmatist in me knows I must take steps *now* to prepare for what's in the pipeline.  I think very few people here would disagree when I posit that the next gut punch is going to be even less pleasant than 2001 or 2008.

So, having gotten that long-winded intro out of my system, here's the news on the Distributed Village front:

Right now, when I say "like-minded individuals in my social circle" I'm talking about maybe 12-15 people out of a group of maybe 40 or so.  These are people who know something's wrong, and would like to take steps to prepare.  (There are maybe 4-5 of us that'd be game for a common-land living arrangement -- the remainder vary in terms of their interest/ability to undertake prep.)  There are 3-4 families that currently are looking to move (incl. my wife & I) and every one of them agree in principle that it'd be cool and smart to live in greater geographic proximity.  (Currently the closest neighbors in this group are 10 minutes apart and the most distant are over an hour by car.)  So we are, in theory, willing to nucleate closer together (ideally within a mile or two) IF folks are able to sell their current domiciles and IF real estate opportunities exist.  

That's a lotta IF.  But that seems to be the current reality of things.  Future events may motivate people more highly, but at that point the idea of cashing out of one's house might no longer be feasible.

(nb:  I'm purposely leaving The Homestead out of this current discussion [if you're new to this thread, just read some of my "Homestead" posts earlier in time] -- FWIW, D&B are weeks away from moving into their house/barn and things are proceeding apace -- I'm still working up there one day a week...and the wife has gone from "Heck no!" to "I'm dubious" to "I could be convinced" but right now going in w/D&B at the Homestead is not a viable option...)

So the process of possible re-location of a Village nucleus is underway but until a number of the IFs eventuate I'm putting my energy elsewhere.

To wit:  even if we cannot simply re-locate everybody and start raising goats and chickens, I figure we can at least begin to undertake efforts in the direction of sustainability & resilience -- sort of "proof of concept" that as a group we can help each other out on those fronts whether or not we're neighbors.  To that end, after dinner w/one of the "like-minded" couples last Saturday, 6 of us (3 married couples) are going to create the CFTC, or Cooperative Farming o'Them Chickens.  The other 2 couples live across the Hudson from us (by far the most geographically remote of our group), but one of them have 20+ acres to play with.  The 4 of them will together raise about 100 roaster chickens.  My wife & I are going to raise laying chickens.  Come the Fall we'll have a chicken-harvesting day (bring in an expert to show us the ropes), and with any luck (allowing for attrition due to sickness and predators) each couple will end up with 25+ chickens for the freezer.  My wife & I will aim to raise 3-6 dozen eggs a week on our land.  One of the folks across the river works in a middle-ground location and so we'd meet him once a week to dish their share of the eggs.  

So -- we get to do something right *now*, we start up that learning curve (one of the couples is also starting in w/rabbits for meat), and we get to figure out how we all are when it comes to being able to rely on each other.  Assuming the CFTC works out, we can then realistically start to dream on bigger things.

Viva -- Sager

edited for spelling

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Re: Community Building

Sager,   Do try to stay encouraged and working toward the goal.

   Out here in the boonies of America  we just joke with each other  ...   a traffic jam is 4 trucks following a tractor .        Where it is "Ok "because we are all  basically  the same  , where only  the graduates want out .   

I watched the movie Sweet Land ...  it is so the story of our grandparents . But for  us even a little more complicated as the German grandma  was married to Irish Grandpa   this caused even more struggles  as each of our communities around were built around what Old Country  they came from .   ANYWAY  building  YOUR community may be easier now than then .   When the second wave comes after this you will find more seeking . And how great it is that the wife is coming around !   If you have her on your side you will not be divided .

  Farm land is not going down in price and only may go down IF the banks hold back on operation loans to the farmers .   Here Many farms are way too big and they will eventually have to divide  or  be controlled more by the Govt.

  A support system is key .

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Re: Community Building

Thanks for the encouraging words, Full Moon -- just for the record, I'm nigh unto near-irrepressible, so even when I'm flatly stating the long odds of achieving a thing, I'm not (probably) disheartened.  I'm certainly not here.  I guess I'm just coming to the conclusion that the timeline for such a project as putting together the kind of community I'd like to see (and that I feel is crucial to long-term prosperity [as we here at CM generally understand that word]) is long...longer than I first thought. 

And most certainly, having my wife come around is hugely important.

And double-most-certainly, "Sweet Land" is a fine story.  The story of my grandparents, too.

Again, thanks! -- and VIVA! -- Sager

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The ol 'Homestead part 7

So, the latest news re D&B's Homestead is:

Tomorrow I'll head up there on my day off, probably starting around 8 or so.  It's actually time for them to start moving onto the land they've owned for a number of years and have been preparing for this day for about 5.  Right now they're too stressed to be really jubilant about it but I'm going to insist they celebrate one way or t'other.  <grin>

In recent weeks they've been pushing hard to finish the plumbing and to rough-off some mods to the original plan (about 1/2 the second story was to be left open so that there was a large internal high-ceiling space, but they expanded the 2nd floor over about 1/2 of that to provide more sqft of living space -- I'm planning to give them a Brasilian hammock that'll hang perfectly in the remaining open area as a housewarming gift). 

There will still be plenty of finish work to do after they've moved in, but the important thing is that they'll actually be inhabiting the dream they've been working on for many moons.  

As I posted earlier, my wife is still not quite on the "let's build our own little house [with D&B's help] on the Homestead land over the next year or two [and add to it as time goes on] and live mortgage-free" plan, but -- apart from the pleasure I get from helping some good folks realize their vision -- it may be that my dedication and diligence in this area could change things.  We shall see.

In the meantime, tomorrow I'll be doing goodness only knows what (last week I was priming and painting ceiling panels [a bright sky-blue] for B's work studio ceiling).  But I'll be serving a worthy thing that's bigger than me and in my book that's time well-spent.  

And, FWIW, my hours in their Labor Exchange keep adding up.  What goes around...

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Community Building

Here is some community building gone bad LOL.....

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The ol'Homestead: D-Day

Tomorrow's the day that D&B are going to move to the Homestead from their current digs.  I'm going to do my usual workday and then take the pickup over and help them finish up.  This is a significant thing as least inasmuch as 

(a) they get the chance to start living their dream, and 

(b) anytime you get an opportunity to help somebody do (a) it's a good thing, and

(c) it's possible at some point me'n'mine will be joining forces with D&B so helping them is helping me'n'mine.

Anyhow, just a short post w/an update.  It all gets realer tomorrow.  They're going to be living on the land.  VIVA!

Sager

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Re: Community Building

Sager,

Any chance you want to move to the midwest? I got the perfect spot picked out for ya Wink

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Re: Community Building

Ready wrote:

Sager,

Any chance you want to move to the midwest? I got the perfect spot picked out for ya Wink

Actually, there is a possibility that we'd end up in Eastern Iowa.  My mom's family still farms out there and they have made it clear that we are welcome no matter how heinous things get.  I guess the pick-up-and-move-to-IA scenario would be a sudden economic crash in the very near term (before we had taken further steps to thrive in this neck of the woods).  

I guess the scenario would be our biz croaks rapidly (say, stock market down 80% and our clients decide Pilates & massage aren't in the budget).  We'd somehow need to be able to get there (1500 miles is no laughing matter post-crash).  But even if gas was $30/gallon we could afford to drive since we've got some cash laid up.  And once we were there, we'd simply step back in time about 90 years and go back to the old family business.  

I can imagine far worse ways to live.  

Just curious, Ready:  where are you (give or take)?

Viva -- Sager 

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Re: Community Building

I currently live a dual life - kinda like you are working towards. My company and home are in St. Louis, and my farm is in southern mo, not far from the AR border.

I'm set up there off grid, orchard in place, gardens blooming, chickens growing, making my own biodiesel, heating with wood, etc.

We tried the meat chickens thing for the first time (at scale) this year too. We got 50 cornish cross day old chicks and they are about 3 weeks from the freezer. I learned a ton on this, especially that  it is more expensive to do it yourself if you have to buy food. Next year I will grow my own scratch and it will most likely make econnomic sense. Just getting the knowledge under your belt is worth the money spent tho, IMO.

This pic is about a month old... man they grow fast.

The ducks are my fertilizer team Laughing

Chicks

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Re: Community Building

Dude, I totally spaced out on the reason for the original post. While I know it is a long shot, my farm neighbor is selling his property to move closer to his son. At 93, he just can't keep up with the place anymore.

Where I am at, land is somewhere between $1,000 - $1,500 / acre. Since he has 220 acres and is willing to section it off, there is a beautiful little 40 acre wooded section that shares a driveway with my farm. I'd love to get a like minded family(s) to move in there to expand the community, but my guess is the property will not be sold any time soon, so I will be neighborless. We'll see...

Since the property is heavily wooded, and I have a sawmill, somebody with a strong back and desire to live without debt (building your own house) is certainly a possibility.

R

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Re: Community Building

Ready ,  

  You do appear to be ready !      That is an interesting poultry set up you have there.   I was bummed last week when I missed a very nice chicken plucker on Craigs list for $50 .     That sawmill  you have is a great bonus !     And the price of land !  I can not believe  farm land  here went for $4000  and Pasture for close to $2000 .    My dad bought his land 18 years ago for $100 per acre . Anyway   hope somebody jumps on the bargain  you have there .

  I  too am in the midwest and was curious as to why we have not been as effected here as most  places in the USA.   Come to find much info on the Internet  just  google the County  you    are interested in .  Like the fact that 2/3 of the population live in the country , a  large percent  have their homes paid for and very few have a huge mortgage . (I am guessing these few have gone elsewhere to get their loans ) There is  very low crime, welfare , divorce etc.   Still has a lot of volunteers to work in the community .  The banks are independent and fairly secure with A  ratings .       We are experiencing people moving in but still have more deaths than births so  the schools are talking consolidation  but other than that I do not see  things changing  much .    Possibly because not much has changed in 50 years Laughing.   HOWEVER the collapse of the $ and  high price of oil will change everything because a lot of the farmers are working 1000-4000  acres .  My son -in-law said at the farm where he works the tractors run themselves !  He drives a row around the field then puts it in auto pilot,  some computer even tells if they are getting too many seeds per acre.   Boy there is the worry what will everyone do if the gas goes to high or the  EMP thing happens .   Of course there are enough antique equipment around but would not be enough people to run them .

Each little town has it's own farmers market  and I was looking to see if anything would be a good thing to sell there . But As I drive around I see gardens in a lot of  yards .    We have locals who take care of bees and such  .   Soooo since a great number of the population are elderly I am going to figure what they might need . Right now I believe we are need of  plumbers  so will  try to encourage one of my sons to check into this line .

Anyway there is much to look at when choosing a community ,you seem to have found a great one and  since we are truely not self suffiecient ,having  different gifts and talents , it should  be a good thing to have your community expanded some .   I am sure you will have many like minded people take you up on the offer .

FM

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Re: Community Building

FM - This might be an option for you:

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0006150220077a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntt=plucker&Ntk=Product_liberal&sort=all&N=0&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form1

Trick is you have to start with a dry bird. The complaints about this seem to be when you try to pluck a wet duck, it doesn't work well.

I'm going to try this this year, and if it doesn't work well, go back to dipping in boiling water before plucking. I've never done this many birds at once, so I am looking for a good workflow to minimize the job.

PS - I don't know if I am really ready, but I sleep pretty well at night. Time will tell...

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Re: Community Building

Sager,    Sorry if  I am off topic here , but did want to get these couple of hints in . 

Ready , 

  If you put a little paraffin in the hot water the duck and goose feathers come off easier .  Another trick is to wrap them in  hot wet newspaper for a while  or if you do not care to keep the skin you can slit a little whole in the skin at the neck and put a water hose in it . Turn the water up and the skin will separate from the meat  then skin and feathers will be easy to remove.

FM

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Re: Community Building

Well, poultry-de-feathering hints aren't strictly community building, but I'm not nearly enough of a topic nazi to, uh...get my feathers ruffled about it.  Wink

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Re: Community Building

Since we bought our rural acreage last year, we've actually gotten to know our new neighbors out there better than our neighbors here on our suburban street.  Could be something to do with the fact that everybody in town stays in their AC in front of the TV.  Out there, somebody is always working on a barn or a fence or a garden or a tractor or a horse.  There's lots to learn and we're the new eager beavers.  We show a lot of respect for the old timers, which is very genuine.  We ask them how they do things and we've found out some of them know our grand and great-grand parents.  Its always a nice moment when they ask who's your daddy and we explain and then the say "You don't say!  I used to work with his brother back in yadda yadda..."

We've shared our heirloom seeds with our closest neighbor, and he knew somebody who could disc us up a garden.  He was another good neighbor to meet, and we have since leased out some unused pasture to him in return for tractor work when we need it.  The hubby also wants to learn some animal husbandry from him. 

People are just more outdoorsy and neighborly in the counrty, I guess.  We're in town people, but I guess they can see we're trying.  We're generous with our resources when we have them, and they're so friendly and helpful. 

We've mentioned vaguely that we think bad things are starting to happen in the world, and that seemed to open up a very agreeable can of worms.  I'm not gonna band-wagon them just yet, as I don't feel right going out there and shoving my beliefs around amongst the established community.  Right now, we help, keep quiet, and learn where we can. 

They all know we've built an outhouse and I don't know what they think of that.  We've talked of adding a rainwater collection system to the barn, and the guy leasing it likes the idea.   So, that with the heirloom seeds is the very beginning of food, water, and sanitation.  I haven't been forward enough to ask, but I can safely assume as we are in the south and surrounded by good ole boys, there are plenty of firearms and ammo out there for hunting and defense.  There's only one way in and out of the area, so we could probably hold our own with watch rotation if we needed to, as there are enough of us.

So, I haven't put the CC in front of them, nor will I as they aren't into that anyway.  They could run circles around me with rural life skills, so I will be the student, and if I can help with setting up long term sanitation, or teaching children, or gardening, then I'd be thrilled.

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Re: Community Building

Swampmama, sounds like you've made an awesome start!  Congrats!  

Re showing your rural neighbors the CC:  I had a thought about my maternal grandpa last week -- the farmer -- and I thought about what he'd think if I showed him the CC.  My dream of that moment had him looking at the material, shrugging a bit ("Well, those sure are some nice graphs.") and then carrying on.  I took that momentary vision to be my own wish that the CC material was as self-evident to everybody as it might have been to my grandpa.  The first person to ever warn me against getting in debt was my Dad.  The second was my grandpa.

Viva -- Sager

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Re: Community Building

Yeah, I don't think the older folks really need it, if they're already the agrarian sort.  If they're old enough, they'll teach us a thing or two if we'll slow down and listen.  I'm lucky enough to have been a late in life child to a mother who grew up on a farm were things were done the old way.  Mom still talks of the time her mom made a cake and the neighbor ladies were amazed because cooking oil couldn't be had then.  She had saved the fat from a chicken she'd killed for a meal, then rendered it into oil.  So, chicken oil in a cake.  (here we are talking of poultry again! useful critters)

I did show the CC to one elder in my family, but he's a CPA and an investor so he got it no problem.  He just didn't believe it.  He was of the mentality that things have always been fine and they will continue to be fine.  Ugh.  I tried.  But, he's more prepped than me in some ways, too.  They have no debt at all and pay cash for everything.  The wife is a coupon shopper and every shelf and closet is tumbling with food she got on sale.  They may be in denial, but they're incidentally prepped anyway. 

I suppose I've CC'd and community built as much as I can for now without being a pest and a freak.  If I meet anybody else who seems receptive, I have my info ammo at the ready.  Most folks around here just don't wanna know, though.

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Re: Community Building

Full Moon wrote:

Sager,    Sorry if  I am off topic here , but did want to get these couple of hints in . 

Ready , 

  If you put a little paraffin in the hot water the duck and goose feathers come off easier .  Another trick is to wrap them in  hot wet newspaper for a while  or if you do not care to keep the skin you can slit a little whole in the skin at the neck and put a water hose in it . Turn the water up and the skin will separate from the meat  then skin and feathers will be easy to remove.

FM

FM,

A neighbor uses a similar proceedure to skin his chickens but uses compressed air to squirt under the skin at the neck rather than water. He likes his chicken better when prepared with the skin on but really likes the ease of simply skinning them with an air hose!

I'm hoping to add ducks and chickens to the yardscape next year.

Coop

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Re: Community Building

The way I think is often off  a beat   but  I would think  poultry  , rabbits  ,  pigs, goats   ( I do not care for sheep or wearing wool.) then cows would be the  animal order to prepping. Especially  if a person was truly concerned about not having  electricity for  freezers . Pigs  & goats   would be a toss up as both can forage , goats give milk  but pigs  have bigger litters .   The small animals  would be butchered and eaten without leftovers and be a better barter item .If you think you are going to be good at hunting without prep you might be surprised too this is a skill that is learned from  practice.   I still wonder if people really think things will get bad  for I do not see  very many truly  getting ready  to survive  after their storage is gone.  So is our worry   just the possibility of  things getting twice as bad as now  or socialism then?  Or  are we just  worried about protecting our wealth by  buying gold  ?     .

Just this  gals opinion  of who I would  consider   inviting into my community ....   Just who would really be an asset .  Those with skills( butcher , baker ,candlestick maker ) not just those who talk about getting around to it .   Someone that knows useful things that you do not .  It is one thing to read it in a book another to actually pull it off.   Honestly I would have some serious  thoughts and doubts.... Be careful  just because they realize something is wrong does not make them an asset . 

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Community wedding

Hey all --

My wife's best friend got married this past weekend.  After all the last-second drama that often comes with a wedding day, the party/reception was an awesome affirmation of the bond that our social circle has.  These are definitely a bunch of people that genuinely enjoy each other's company and care about each other.  So -- apart from simply enjoying the community's warm glowing warming glow (to quote one H. Simpson), it was also an affirmation that we're on the right path in terms of gathering a cohesive social unit (on, roughly, the size of a village-type community).

Now, if only they could catch some fire from the CC.  At this point, 4/5ths of them are stuck firmly in denial (or a feeling of impotence in the face of developing events).  

I guess I'll just 'hele on' (Hawaiian pidgin for "keep on truckin") and when they come around I'll be waiting...

Psyched to get back up to the Homestead this Friday and see how D&B are settling in.

Viva -- Sager 

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2104
Went to Albany today...

...which is the location of a coin/PM dealer I like/trust, and bought some junk silver.  The cool thing about this trip was that I went with a member of my social community -- she and her husband are starting to come around pretty strongly to a CC-aligned way of looking at the future.  So it's getting less lonely on the prep road for the Sagerdude!Laughing

Viva!

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Online)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1462
seedlings as ambassadors

We planted three tomato seeds per square foot gardening box and now we need to thin them to one per box.

We plan to transplant the seedlings to cups and give them to like-minded neighbors we met when we were handing out Christmas cookies. Why wait to share our overabundance of tomatos? This should be fun!

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2104
Re: seedlings as ambassadors

safewrite wrote:

We planted three tomato seeds per square foot gardening box and now we need to thin them to one per box.

We plan to transplant the seedlings to cups and give them to like-minded neighbors we met when we were handing out Christmas cookies. Why wait to share our overabundance of tomatos? This should be fun!

That is an excellent idea, Safewrite.  And even better if they need help on how to raise veggies -- it'll be an ongoing process instead of a "drop-the-cookies-off-and-that's-it" sort of thing.  You *go*!

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2104
A poet buddy of mine...

A poet buddy of mine is feeling All The Looming Mayhem, too.

While he takes a more purely spiritual approach -- I don't believe he's seen the CC -- he is clearly tapped into the zeitgeist.  I searched this site for a Definitive Poetry Thread but didn't find it, so I'm putting this in here.  After all, he's part of my community, and the protagonist[s] of the poem in question is most definitely All of Us.  

And the clear message that I take away is "Don't be scared, don't be discouraged, don't worry about what you might lose -- focus on what is essential to hold on to, and just keep on keepin' on."  No doubt other folks will see other meaningful things.

Viva -- Sager

Quote:

"DREAM  THE  HARVEST  WHILE  PLANTING"

This year

is a passage tomb.

The stone markers

are blank today

but if you squint

you can see the words:

[We are all dying to something along the way.]

The past.

Old masks.

Throwing away the flask.

Learning

to let go

of a love

that went back

to the Source.

It is the year,

ready or not,

when we all

become Travelers.

This year

is a funeral pyre.

Almost as if

our tongues

were on fire,

we keep

waking up

with the question:

'How can I hold all of this?'

Everything

knitted

into Grandmother's

flowing green skirts

tells us:

"Not too tight, not too loose."

And while few

do this dance well,

knocking over tables

and snuffing out

all of the candles

on the way through,

there is nothing

absolutely nothing

left to do

but keep dancing,

moving forward in the dark,

planting seeds

of your deepest dreams

out in the fields

within your heart.

__________________________________

from SHIKANTAZA: Verses from the Other Side of Time

(c) 2010 / Frank Owen / NEKYIA.POETRY (www.facebook.com/nekyia.poetry)

SagerXX's picture
SagerXX
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 2104
People are coming around...

...to seeing things through the CC lens (or a CC-esque lens).

Yesterday was my wife's 50th birthday party.  Apart from it just being a lovely time gathered w/a bunch of people from our community, it was great to find myself -- near the end of the party -- sitting in a little huddle w/3 other people talking about everything from the GoM situation, deflation vs. inflation, day trading (and the related subject -- if we started studying how it's done right now, would we be ready to go live as day traders before the markets ceased to exist [or underwent some fundamental change that would make day trading impossible/unfeasible]), the Fed, the Euro situation, with a shout-out to Peak (Cheap) Oil and related environmental concerns.  

A year ago, most of these subjects would've been conversation-killers.  I was pretty much alone.  

Now there's 4 of us.  Slow progress, but progress nonetheless.  Gratifying.

Viva -- Sager

Amanda V's picture
Amanda V
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 31 2008
Posts: 261
Re: Community Building

OK SagerXX I have been meaning to share this wee story for a while.

One great thing about our rural community is that somebody had started a "googlegroups" email group.   So with the click of the mouse we can send a message to the whole community.  So far about 45 of the 120 households has subscribed.

We get emails that are usually for instance " I am slaughtering a cow, does anybody want to go halves" or " anybody got any grazing" or " I would be happy to swap some milk from my cow for any fruit or veges you have grown"

So I sent an email out with a very brief summary of Chris Martensons site and work and that I would be showing the 45 minute video at the local hall.  I also paid the post man $20 to deliver a flyer to every single letter box with the same information.

Man I was nervous but I had great support from some of my fellow Transition towns friends.  I couldn't believe my eyes but the hall was full !  I had expected (and told the local council) that my expectation was for about 10 people if I was lucky.  So the video showed and at the end I got up and very nervously spoke again.  I asked how many people enjoyed the video.  That was a stupid first question and not one person put up their hand.  But I had a wee chat and offered coffee and tea at the back of the room.

The positives were that everyone stayed for coffee and tea and seemed to enjoy chatting to everyone else in the community.  I had also some CM discs for sale at the back of the room with the full crash course on it, and some with the 45 minute verson, and heaps of them sold (note only for $1 - the cost of the disc).  And plus we got quite a few more households wanting to join the googlegroups group too.

So all in all it was a good community building and awareness evening.  I think.

To follow up I am going to organise, with some enthusiastic others, to have a commnunity get together "pot luck" lunch type of thing at my house for the whole community.  That is my next step.

This next piece of news is an aside but it is exciting so will put it here:  the local radio station (just a very small station) rang me up wanting to interview me about my motivation for doing this public event and to talk about chris martenson for 10 minutes.  Now I was really nervous !  I rehearsed my answers to questions he might ask for ages ... and the day came .... and my husband says I was amazing.  Then again maybe he is biased!  The worst part is that I didn't think to record it, and the station is so small that they weren't set up to be recording it either.  Oh well.

Full Moon's picture
Full Moon
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 14 2008
Posts: 1258
Re: Community Building

Amanda ,

We had a  situation happen in our small town yesterday that   was an example of what you say .    Our local Police Officer pulled over a guy with a traffic  violation . The guy shot the cop and stole the police vehicle .  With in minutes the whole town had been alerted and put on lock down . I was in a meeting  but got a call from my #2 son right away and able to alert  family , neighbors , friends and get to cover  . They all did the same .

We found out this man had killed someone earlier in  the  big city .

They were able to trap the man within blocks and the house surrounded ....the wounded cop life starred out .     The swat team was called out  from the city and was here  within the  hour  and the house surrounded . He had a hostage but she was released within a couple hours .  Tear gas and Sting balls were used to smoke him out but  they did wait until daylight  to go in and remove him .

We were able to listen to the whole thing on the Internet scanner  and talk back and forth on FB . The whole county was on lock down within a few minutes more .

If  Electronics communication had been down things would not have gone so smoothly BUT  I still believe small towns  have a huge advantage  . Ours is right at 1000 pop. county pop is 10,000 .     I urge  people to prayerfully consider  their community and communication .

FM

PS. the office is going to be Ok .

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