Best place to buy gold bullion?

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GR8TFUL's picture
GR8TFUL
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Best place to buy gold bullion?

Like most things these days, I would guess that the internet would be the best (i.e., cheapest) place to buy gold, but hopefully some of you can advise me. I'm not interested in trying to purchase one or two coins on ebay, but rather dollar cost averaging several lump $10,000 purchases.

There's a local dealer who normally has Eagles & Maples, & currently he is charging $80 over spot (roughly 10%). Seems like a high margin to me, but the advantage is immediate delivery & no records. Buying online, I'd have to pay some premium over spot, plus shipping & insurance, plus wait for delivery. And of course there would be a record of my purchase. I don't really care about that, but all other things being equal no record is better.

 Can any of you recommend (from personal experience) online dealers? Who consistently offers the best price & service? Or should I just make the 10 minute drive, pay the local guy his $80 premium, and be done with it?

 PS: Sorry if similar questions from others have already been answered--I did a search for "gold bullion" and "gold dealers" on this site but so much stuff came up that I couldn't find what I was looking for!

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I just checked NWT mint on line (good prices), they charge $65.00 over spot and take up to 14 weeks to deliver (free postage).  If I was dropping 10k, I'd rather pay the $80.00 over spot per coin and walk away with the item and no record of me purchasing, but there could be some hidden gems on line that I've never been able to find...

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Under the ACT tab, Chris has a nice writeup on buying gold, including a few places he has dealt with.

A few weeks ago  I made my first purchase, from golddealer.com ( California Numismatic Investments). Their add-on was a bit higher than others but they have a low minimum ($2000) and free shipping. I received my order in about a week after I did the wire transfer.

I wanted to buy locally, but when I called to get general info they hung up on me - twice. So I went online and found CNI to be very patient and helpful with explaining the process.Others are probably good too, but you will probably narrow it down quickly based on exactly what you want to buy and how much you want.

Like you note, buying gold shows up a lot here - maybe we can keep this thread going with recommendations from others as to who they go to and what the experience was.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Thanks for the info., Steve--that's what I was looking for!  In case others are interested in online sites that Chris "recommended" here's the info. he wrote in the ACT section:

----------------------------------------------

Where should I buy it?

There are lots and lots of potential sources. Go comparison-shopping and get the best price you can. A couple of good sites are:

  1. http://tulving.com
  2. http://certifiedmint.com
  3. http://www.coloradogold.com
  4. http://www.golddealer.com

Consider also your local coin shops, which have the advantage of enabling you to more easily participate in smaller purchases and preserve your anonymity, should that be important to you.

 --------------------------------------------------------------------

Today, tulving.com seems to have the best price--Maples for $49 over spot and Eagles for $69 over spot, both offer free shipping/insurance. So, for $11 more a coin I can buy locally, get immediate delivery, and of course no records. Guess that's what I'll do . . .

 

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

It is true that many have problems finding a good source to buy gold i have problems setting up to sell gold.

Credit card payment is out of the question because money can be requested back for as long as a year. Money transfer requires trust from the buyer and obviously when i start i don't have build up credibility.

Transport and insurance does cost but is reasonable.

I am working on it but i don't expect to be up and running quick. I am now reading ebay en paypal rules to see if selling gold is allowed through their channels.

I registered www.physicalgold.org to setup shop to provide people a way to buy physical gold. It will be directly from the 'factory' so markups are low. Quantities can be anything between 1 gram and 1500 gram. I want to do this to provide a service and not for making lots of money. As long as i can keep it break even i am fine. The work, in this case actually my wifes, is our contribution.

My question is what are the conditions that will be necessary to be trustworthy enough for people to buy with me.

Suggestions are very welcome. 

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Brainless: You wrote:

 I registered www.physicalgold.org to setup shop to provide people a way to buy physical gold. It will be directly from the 'factory' so markups are low.

 Not to rain on your parade, but the source is the mint, and I don't see how you'd be able to buy or sell lower than companies who have been around for decades and do hundred million $ + transactions per year . . . best of luck to you though.

My main frustration w/ investing in gold is the spread. Most of us pay a premium when we buy AND when we sell (though I wouldn't be surprised if many investors have never sold any of the gold they've bought), so gold has to go up about 20% for the average joe investor to just break even.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Excellent experience buying from Tulving.com. Quick phone call order, a walk over to the bank to send wire, and recieved shipment registered mail within 2 days.  

 

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Check this http://www.goldtraders.or.th/index_en.php

At the top you see this:


 
gold and jewelry price Gold Price by Gold Traders Association 18 December 2008 16:39 .
Gold 96.5 % Buy Sell
Gold bars, Bullion (THB) 13850 13950
Gold Ornaments (THB) 13644 14350

 these are prices in Thai baht. The spread is 100 baht (about 3 US$)

As export of gold bars and bullion is forbidden the price for gold Ornaments are the ones i have to use.

The spread there is around 700 baht (21 US$), but more importantly the difference between bullion and ornaments is only 400 baht (12 US$).

I bought bullion annd ornaments myself about a week ago for 13100 and 13400. The price now is already almost 1000 baht more.

Now here is the good thing about the difference between Bullion and Ornaments.

(Please note that in Thailand they use a 1 baht coin as a weight, that is at least 15.244 gram for bullion and at least 15.16 gram for ornaments)

 if you buy '1 baht' weight gold you pay today 13950 for bullion and 14350 for ornaments. 400 is the markup.

Now if you buy more it gets interesting. Say you buy 5 baht weight then bullion wil be 5x13950, make it into a coin or a bracelet or something else add about 400 for manufacturing. Now the 400 baht is divided over 5 baht 'raw' gold and it is now 11.76$ markup over a price total of 2051US$.

for comparing purposes with a 99.99% pure oz of gold you can calculate it like this.

1 troy ounce is 31.1034768 gram, 1 baht is 15.244 gram, bullion is 99.99% pure, Thai gold is 96.5% pure

First calculate how much gold there is in 1 baht gold.      15.244 * 0.965 = 14,71046 grams.

then calculate how many baht gold is in 1 troy ounce       31.1034768 : 14.71046 =   2,11438 Baht (weight)

That means i can sell 1 troy ounce of gold for  2.11438 x dayprice for bullion + 400 baht manufacturing costs

Today that would mean 2.11438 x 13950 + 400 = 29.896 baht ( 879 US$)

879 US$ would be 9 US$ above spot price.

Above prices in US$ are calculated with an exchange rate of 1 US$ = 34 baht. 

 

And to prove how much markup is normal here is a gold bracelet on ebay for 529US$.

http://cgi.ebay.com/22k-gold-heart-bracelet-from-thailand-bb_W0QQitemZ350091420687QQcategoryZ92718QQcmdZViewItem

I can sell that same item for 450US$

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

24K or 99.99% pure gold coins won't last a few days in your wallet. It is much to soft. 22K is as high as you can get to have a coin that can at least withstand some use, even better is 18K.

Weights. About 1 gram is around 25-30US$. Still too large amount for daily use. 0.1 gram (2.5US$) comes close.

I don't see it happen. Gold is not as easy as the coins and paper we have now.

Linking money and gold is a good thing. Money can be made in lots of different nominations. And it can be re-adjusted to a gold standard when the need arises.

 

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Brainless wrote:

24K or 99.99% pure gold coins won't last a few days in your wallet. It is much to soft. 22K is as high as you can get to have a coin that can at least withstand some use, even better is 18K.

Weights. About 1 gram is around 25-30US$. Still too large amount for daily use. 0.1 gram (2.5US$) comes close.

I don't see it happen. Gold is not as easy as the coins and paper we have now.

Linking money and gold is a good thing. Money can be made in lots of different nominations. And it can be re-adjusted to a gold standard when the need arises.

 

These shekels are sent mint fresh in a durable sealed plastic certificate, so they are protected until you break that seal.

In history when currencies fail, pure gold and silver have always become the money of last resort.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I bought gold from www.goldsurebullion.com

They were cheaper than most other sites. Also, I could order 100% online. I liked that it was fully automated and that I could order like a stock. Pretty neat stuff. Also I called and there was someone to answer the phone after I ordered. I highly recommend.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

SamuelS,

Welcome to the site.  Actually, I just checked and they were significantly more expensive than either Apmex or Gainesville Coin, two companies that I like.  Therefore, I'd pass.   

You wouldn't by any chance be a spammer, would you?  Your post sounds like it.  My apologies if you're not.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I ordered some American Eagle's and a Bag of Junk Silver  from Precious Metals Brokerage Group, www.pmbg.net. The person I spoke with was very knowledgeable about the markets, pricing was transparent, and my package arrived within 3 business days. The ability to track my package all the way up until it arrived at my door was also a nice perk.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Anybody else ever deal with these people. I checked (online) their gold eagle price versus some other dealers that I have used. They seem to be less expensive but I have not heard of them before so I would like some other feedback. It is always hard for me to send money to someone I don't know.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I was asked to write a review of my experience with PMBG. It was good, so I did.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

ShopScout12 wrote:

I was asked to write a review of my experience with PMBG. It was good, so I did.

I am glad that it worked out well for you. I was just asking if anyone else had used this company.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

ShopScout12 wrote:

I ordered some American Eagle's and a Bag of Junk Silver  from Precious Metals Brokerage Group, www.pmbg.net. The person I spoke with was very knowledgeable about the markets, pricing was transparent, and my package arrived within 3 business days. The ability to track my package all the way up until it arrived at my door was also a nice perk.

I think you got snookered my friend.  APMEX has $1000 face value junk silver bags for over $3,000 less than PMBG ($18,926.05 vs. $21.940.54) or almost 14% less.  I'd shop around next time.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

APMEX is a good place to buy.

So is Tulving.com ( despite the "basic" website ).  Bag there is 18,668. (26.11 spot )   He sells at spot x 715oz.  Used to sell under spot. Gold minimum is 20oz for most items.  Free overnight shipping, and free shipping back to him if you want to sell. 

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I've read all your comments and trying to take notes. I'm very excited to purchase some gold soon- brand new to this! And with the falling dollar it's a 'no-brainer' to me. I just don't know much about how to start. If anyone has any good direction on how to first start (I looked on the sites you shared and was overwhelmed with the choices) I would love it. Thanks in advance.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

Interesting read on Gold:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/236805-the-gold-standard-is-no-silver-bullet?source=email_the_daily_dispatch

The Gold Standard Is No Silver Bullet

Calls for a return to the gold standard are in vogue these days. Tying the value of the dollar and other currencies to the precious metal is considered a monetary salve that will soothe the economic ills that harass us. It's an idea whose time has come…again, we're told. The World Bank's president last week suggested that the world should embrace, in part, a gold-based monetary system. And in yesterday's New York Times, financial writer James Grant eloquently pined for the gold standard of yore. "The classical gold standard, the one that was in place from 1880 to 1914, is what the world needs now," he writes.

Grant delivers a stirring brief for the precious metal as a monetary foundation. In advancing the agenda, he focuses on the benefits. But like so many gold bugs, Grant ignores the challenges. Those challenges are significant. Indeed, there are fundamental reasons why gold was abandoned as a monetary standard. Those reasons weren't trivial, nor would they be resolved in the 21st century. A gold standard, quite simply, is a wonderful thing…until it's not.

Every monetary system suffers tradeoffs. There is no ideal strategy for a) insuring price stability; b) minimizing economic volatility; and c) maximizing employment. Expecting gold will deliver will somehow dispense all three is expecting the impossible in the long run. True, anything's possible for a time, with or without gold. At times there's a virtuous circle of positive reinforcement in the business cycle that promotes that trio. One of those periods recently ended. The Great Moderation, as it's called, ran from roughly the mid-1980s through 2007, interrupted briefly in 2000-2002 with a severe stock market decline, albeit one that had relatively limited negative consequences for the real economy.

The Great Moderation was hardly perfect, but it was a potent run of employment growth, disinflation, and generally improving economic conditions in the U.S. and around the world. And in case you didn't notice, it all arrived without gold as a monetary standard. Fiat money has its problems, starting with the fact that it requires enlightened management. But it's not a hard-wired impediment to macroeconomic progress.

What, then, is behind the renewed urge to return to a gold standard? Like gold itself, the sentiment is an amalgam of allure and contradiction. Gold, after all, is first and foremost a prescription for putting a lid on inflation. But inflation is hardly a near and present danger. The economy's suffering from a severe bout of deleveraging, which is pushing the broad pricing trend lower. Yes, future inflation may be a threat in the years ahead, depending on what central bankers do, or don't do. But the macro priority du jour isn't looking for additional ways to reduce inflation, which is what a gold standard would impose. Rather, the principal task is arresting the fall in the inflation trend.

The annual rate of change in the core rate of consumer price inflation is running at roughly one-third the level these days compared with the 3% peak from two years ago. We can debate if that's accurate. But it's the trend that's troubling, not the specific level. Amazingly (for gold bugs), this disinflationary trend has come without a formal link to the world's favorite monetary metal. In a world of fiat money, gold bugs would have you believe, such a potent disinflation trend is impossible. Well, we now know different.

click to enlarge images

A miracle? Hardly. The source of the disinflation, which conceivably could turn into deflation, is the blowback from deleveraging. Economies accumulated too much debt in the boom years of the Great Moderation; servicing that debt in times of weak growth is a burden. Predictably, spending is down and saving is up—exactly what you'd expect in a deleveraging crisis. Moving to a gold standard would only exacerbate the deleveraging process, perhaps to the point of creating a new recession, or perhaps a depression.

We've been here before. The Great Depression of the 1930s was also a period of deleveraging on a mass scale. Some of the catalysts were different, some the same vs. the current climate. One critical distinction between now and then: the gold standard. The U.S. was on a gold standard in the early 1930s; today we're not. That's a significant difference. But note that in both cases a deleveraging crisis arrived. Gold is no magical immunization that prevents financial crises. In fact, a gold standard may, at times, exacerbate those risks.

There's another distinction between now and then: the policy responses. Economists are in broad agreement that forcing "sound money" on an economy during a deleveraging crisis is the equivalent of taking away oxygen from a man who's having trouble breathing. The gold bugs always seem to overlook this point. Sure, if your only goal is maintaining the purchasing power of a currency, gold's your solution. But the body politic and most economists have a broader agenda during times of economic crisis. As such, gold is no help in periods of extreme macro stress.

Economic history is nothing if not clear on this point. Gold forced austerity on the world economies in the early 1930s at exactly the wrong time. To argue otherwise is to ignore a small library of research published over the decades. A few examples of how gold helped turn the economic troubles of the early 1930s into something far deeper can be found in Milton Friedman and Anna Schwartz's A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960, and the recent Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World, by Liaquat Ahamed.

Yes, the gold standard as practiced was self regulating, a benefit that the gold bugs eagerly promote. True, but the dark side of that self-regulation is that gold supplies sometimes flow out of a country as a tool for adjusting trade imbalances. Sounds wonderful, except for the fact that a net outflow of gold is the equivalent of contracting the money supply. What's wrong with that? Nothing, most of the time. But during a severe financial crisis, such as the early 1930s or late-2008, a receding supply of money is akin to playing economic Russian roulette—with a fully loaded gun.

This wasn't widely understood as the 1930s began, but the message began to sink in…slowly. Countries abandoned the gold standard as the 1930s unfolded, with predictable results. As Barry Eichengreen's research shows, the earlier a nation left gold, the sooner its economy began to heal from the deleveraging crisis, as measures of industrial production clearly demonstrate in that period. Eichengreen advises in his 1992 article in Economic History Review that "the timing and extent of depreciation can explain much of the variation in the timing and extent of the economic recovery."


Source: "The origins and nature of the Great Slump revisited," Economic History Review, May 1992

Did abandoning gold--a massive quantitative easing policy of its time--usher in a period of sharply higher inflation? Nope, not even close. There were many econonmic complaints in the post-gold standard world of the 1930s, but inflation wasn't one of them.

If there's a case for returning to a gold standard in the modern era, surely it was stronger back in, say, 2005 and 2006, when inflation was rising and monetary policy appeared to be delivering too much stimulus. Ah-ha! the gold bugs will cry--that's going on now as well. Actually, no. The Federal Reserve isn't trying to raise inflation so much as keep it from falling further. To the casual eye this looks like a misguided policy of trying to stimulate unhealthy increases in inflation. But as the first chart above reminds, the key goal now is simply arresting the disinflation trend. Ours is a crisis bound up with deleveraging, which renders the historical inflation threat null and void, albeit only temporarily.

Yes, the gold standard does of great job of maintaining a currency's value. Most of the time, that's a prudent goal. But sometimes there's a need for intervention in monetary management. The onset of the Great Depression was one of those times. So too was the 2008 financial crisis. Although criticizing the central bank is easy now, pundits are too quick to minimize what might have happened if the Fed didn't inject huge quantities of liquidity into the system in the fall of 2008. By contrast, a full-blown repeat of the Great Depression was more than a minor risk if the Fed had repeated the errors of the 1930s in late-2008. Sometimes an emphasis on austerity via holding tight to the gold standard or its equivalent threatens economic suicide.

Monetary flexibility also carries risks, of course, but so too does putting monetary policy into a straight jacket, a.k.a. adhering to a gold standard. There are no free lunches. And let's also recognize that re-imposing a gold standard today is sure to have zero political tolerance in the next financial crisis. Yes, variations of the gold standard ran for decades in the late-18th and early 20th centuries. But the masses in the 21st century won't tolerate the side effects of a gold standard, such as painful periods of deflation that arose in the 1880s and 1890s. There was a political backlash at the time, culminating in William Jennings Bryan's famous “Cross of Gold” speech at the 1896 Democratic convention. But it was hardly fatal for gold's supporters.

The deflationary runs triggered by the gold standard a century ago carried a small political price. A repeat performance isn't likely. Even if it was politically feasible, a gold standard isn't economically viable. There's a reason why the developed world deserted gold: in times of crisis, it squeezes the economy to a point that the masses suffer. They did so quietly a century ago, but no one will suffer in silence anymore.

Gold bugs like to argue that a gold standard would minimize if not eradicate financial crises. But history says otherwise. Financial crises were a recurring feature during the heyday of the gold standard. Suffice to say, whether we're on a gold standard or running fiat currencies, financial crises will remain a hardy perennial. The question is how central banks deal with those rare but inevitable crises?

Romanticizing the gold standard as an alternative to fiat money provides dramatic copy for pundits, but as a practical solution it's sure to be a dud. Been there, done that

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

I bought some 1 oz. silver bars at APMEX for $30.02 per oz. However they charged me $7 for shipping. I have also bought the same thing on Ebay for the same price but shipping was 'free'.

So depending on how the bid goes and who you deal with you can get some pretty good deals on Ebay.

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

JO,

We're on the same boat. However Don Stott, and family, at Colorado gold are easy and well priced if you don't mind the 10K+ floor on PM purchases. We sold gold recently for a farm purchase and it was handled with the same grace.

robie

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

idoctor wrote:
Interesting read on Gold:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/236805-the-gold-standard-is-no-silver-bullet?source=email_the_daily_dispatch

The Gold Standard Is No Silver Bullet

I read this article and f it really rubbed me the wrong way. Actually - no that's not quite strong enough, I think it was a complete load of BS.

James Picerno wrote:
Every monetary system suffers tradeoffs. There is no ideal strategy for a) insuring price stability; b) minimizing economic volatility; and c) maximizing employment.

Since when was this a requirement of a monetary system.   Money should be a method of trade and a store of value.  The others are all some of the story we have been sold that economic planners can manage a complex system.

James Picerno wrote:
At times there's a virtuous circle of positive reinforcement in the business cycle that promotes that trio. One of those periods recently ended. The Great Moderation, as it's called, ran from roughly the mid-1980s through 2007, interrupted briefly in 2000-2002 with a severe stock market decline, albeit one that had relatively limited negative consequences for the real economy.

This was a good time?  Things were stable? The value of the dollar to purchase goods was reduced by at least 2.5x.  That a price change of 3.5%/yr.  Not exactly price stability.  Oh and never mind the little boo-boo called the dot-com bubble or the nice housing bubble at the end.

James Picerno wrote:
But inflation is hardly a near and present danger.

Really? I guess if you use the governments numbers (as shown to be a bit suspect in the Crash Course).

James Picerno wrote:
The annual rate of change in the core rate of consumer price inflation is running at roughly one-third the level these days compared with the 3% peak from two years ago.

Again, since when was 3% inflation considered stable? 

James Picerno wrote:
One critical distinction between now and then: the gold standard. The U.S. was on a gold standard in the early 1930s; today we're not. That's a significant difference. But note that in both cases a deleveraging crisis arrived. Gold is no magical immunization that prevents financial crises. In fact, a gold standard may, at times, exacerbate those risks.

He points out that the original article by Jame Grant to which this article is a rebuttle, wanted to return to a gold standard between 1880 and 1914.  That would be when money was actually backed and exchangeable for gold.  Well right up until the time it was determined that the Banks (prior to the Fed) and then the Fed after 1913 were printing more dollars than gold.   Stating your on a gold standard and actually being on a gold standard are two different things. Roosevelt made that apparent in 1933 just as those that debased currencies before him did.

James Picerno wrote:
Sure, if your only goal is maintaining the purchasing power of a currency, gold's your solution. But the body politic and most economists have a broader agenda during times of economic crisis. As such, gold is no help in periods of extreme macro stress.

Ah - agenda time.  Can't have a sound money interferring with an agenda.

ARGGHHH - Can't take any more,  I read the article, it continues to be quite a load of .......

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Re: Best place to buy gold bullion?

rhare wrote:

idoctor wrote:
Interesting read on Gold:  http://seekingalpha.com/article/236805-the-gold-standard-is-no-silver-bullet?source=email_the_daily_dispatch

The Gold Standard Is No Silver Bullet

I read this article and f it really rubbed me the wrong way. Actually - no that's not quite strong enough, I think it was a complete load of BS.

James Picerno wrote:
Every monetary system suffers tradeoffs. There is no ideal strategy for a) insuring price stability; b) minimizing economic volatility; and c) maximizing employment.

I agree, it misses the importance of the Impossible Trilemma of monetary policy that I was recently introduced to, in an excellent article that I cannot locate, but this macro-economic model is reviewed in wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impossible_trinity

The model is that any country cannot have 1: a fixed exchange rate, 2: free capital movement and 3: independent domestic monetary policy. Only 2 of these 3 are possible.

Currently the world is largely using floating exchange rates (except perhaps the Chinese). Bretton Woods I with fixed exchange rates started, I believe, with capital controls but then developed to a loss of independent monetary policy (at least that is my personal recollection from the UK).

Any return to a gold standard would then be a fixed exchange rate monetary policy and either capital movement or domestic policy would be sacrificed. Right now with QEII we see the first signs of capital controls (taxes on bonds purchased with US $ by Brazil, among others) in order to maintain domestic policy.

From my limited economics education, I think this is correct.

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" Can any of you recommend

" Can any of you recommend (from personal experience) online dealers? Who consistently offers the best price & service? Or should I just make the 10 minute drive, pay the local guy his $80 premium, and be done with it?"

- As with everything in life, to get the best prices you have to shop around!!

- The SOLUTION:- www.goldshark.com

- This is a website that searches ALL of the reputable online dealers for the LOWEST PRICE instantly for a particular coin (Eagles, Maples, Buffaloes etc...)

- PURE GENIUS!

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GLloyd wrote:- As with

GLloyd wrote:

- As with everything in life, to get the best prices you have to shop around!!

- The SOLUTION:- www.goldshark.com

- This is a website that searches ALL of the reputable online dealers for the LOWEST PRICE instantly for a particular coin (Eagles, Maples, Buffaloes etc...)

- PURE GENIUS!

Unfortunately this site does not seem to show Tulving, a reputable dealer with prices better than any shown at goldshark, at least for the 2 items I searched, 1 oz gold maples and 100 oz JM silver bars..........one wonders why, wonders how many other reputable dealers are not shown and about the legitimacy of a site promoted by a first time poster.

GLloyd's picture
GLloyd
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 5 2012
Posts: 5
RE: www.goldshark.com I was

RE: www.goldshark.com

I was surprised by your comment and checked up on the dealer list, Tulving are included in the search engine along with Apmex, Blanchard, Texmetals, Gainsville, Kitco, NWT Mint and half a dozen others!

The price listed on the results page includes premiums, shipping, insurance and brokerage fees and takes into account volume price breaks! - Its an incredible website that saves me alot of time when I want to invest.

Regards G

Denny Johnson's picture
Denny Johnson
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 13 2008
Posts: 324
Hi GGood to see you

Hi G

Good to see you come back, more likely your original post was sincere, if so, welcome to the site.

Not sure where you are seeing Tulving, but I priced 20 - 1 oz gold maple leaves and 5 - 100 oz JM silver bars at goldshark, Tulving was not shown although their prices are lower than any shown.

Tulving's price also "includes premiums, shipping, insurance and brokerage fees."

Seems to me that goldshark is not all it claims to be, and your post smells a bit spammy for one who just joined today.

I'm not promoting Tulving, just a satisfied customer open to better prices from a reputable dealer, don't see goldshark being much help.

GLloyd's picture
GLloyd
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 5 2012
Posts: 5
Thanks for the reply, True I

Thanks for the reply, True I did join tday, jus found the site, liked it and jumped in!

To answer your question, I too was sceptical about goldshark when I first came across it but after doing some research I found it to be accurate (although I have to admit I didn,t phone Tulving)

I can say though in defense of the spamming accusation that I have used the site to buy silver from Texas Precious Metals and Gold from Gainsville, who are competitors so I could hardly be working for them both! (no offense taken by the way).

Who ever came up with the idea to design a website like Goldshark.com deserves a pat on the back in my view, and no unfortunately it wasn't me.

Cheers.

sand_puppy's picture
sand_puppy
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 13 2011
Posts: 369
Good experience with Franklin Sanders in Tenn

I have had very good experience purchasing gold and silver from Franklin Sanders at http://the-moneychanger.com/

He was recommended to me by Catherine Austin Fitts, a prominent writer and a major source of support for me after I first "took the red pill" in 2005. (solari.com) Franklin has a small business based in Tennessee that has always been very consistent, honorable and clear in all the transactions.  Purchasing goes like this:

(after calling them and ask for recommendations or reading a very helpful article on their website-- "The Ten Commandments for Buying Gold and Silver.")

1.  call them on the phone and tell them what you would like.

2.  they give you the price (which has always been better than everywhere else I have every checked).

3.  you make a verbal contract and close the deal verbally while on the phone.  They email you a copy of the agreement that day.

4.  you mail them a personal check

5.  14 days later, after the check has cleared, they ship the coins in plain brown wrapped boxes.

6.  He agrees to buy back anything he has sold you at any time.

Probably the most important to me, is simply that I trust him.   This is a part of "banking intimately."

jonritter's picture
jonritter
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 4 2012
Posts: 1
local and online dealers

Hello All,

Thanks for posting all this great information I have read and enjoyed reading your thoughts.  I prefer to buy my precious metals on a local level and didn;t even know where to look.  Couple sites I have found that are helpful.

If you are looking to buy online www.golddealerreviews.com has ratings from past customers. 

www.coindealers.org  they have like 3,000+ coin shops listed just do a search with your zip and you can find them.

kitco is also a great place to read and watch the price of gold and silver. 

Peter Schiff is a great person to read as well.  Just google his name and you will find all kind of writing and youtube videos.  I subscribe to his channel so I don't miss anything. 

Hope this helps others as it helped me,

Jon

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