After Chris’ warning today, what are you thinking?

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Travlin's picture
Travlin
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After Chris’ warning today, what are you thinking?

Chris’ report today was the next thing to an “alert”. He is warning us to expect a major financial breakdown soon, starting in Europe. It is not a surprise to those who’ve paid attention, but I imagine some of us are thinking, “So it’s really happening? Now?”   http://www.peakprosperity.com/blog/get-ready-were-about-have-another-200...

I am very grateful that I stumbled onto this site over two years ago, and have had many people help me understand our situation and what I can do about it. I’ve had time to acquire knowledge, make changes, and adjust my outlook. This has been of great benefit to my family. I feel calmly stoical with a bit of apprehension. We face the prospect of serious problems beyond our control, but I think I know enough to handle things reasonably well.

It looks like our grace period is beginning to draw to a close. What do you make of that? And how does it make you feel?

Travlin 

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comfortable

My financial assets are split about evenly between PMs and commercial bonds at the moment.  The bonds are in a 401k fund so my options are limited, but I think I will put them in the US bond fund, which I see as cash equivalent at the moment.  Any critique of that strategy is welcome.

Aside from that, we are heavily into gardening season and thinking of acquiring some more chickens.  Otherwise, life goes on pretty much as it has for the last few years.  Day to day watching the gyrations of the world economy and getting my most valuable input from this site.

Doug

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treemagnet
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Now? Not now....now?

I bet we'll be having this discussion a few more times, but yeah - I hear what you're saying.  I don't think "it"comes until after the elections - I need to throw some money at a few more preps, but overall....I know its coming, we're due, it'll be better after, and so I say bring it.  Definitely not comfortable with what I believe TPTB are willing and capable of doing....actually a bit spooked. 

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Dogs_In_A_Pile
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Honestly.......?

About the same as I felt when the Nuclear and Economic Meltdown Alert was issued following Fukushima. 

I am more concerned about the apparent case of peach scab I have on my trees and wondering if it's too late for a sulfur fungicide application.....?

Trav - I share your appreciation for finding this site and adding resiliency to my home based on the actionable information shared amongst the many members here. 

I also understand your concern.....I just don't share it.

I've always been the 5 CEP outlier so this shouldn't be much of a surprise to most of you.....

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herewego
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not so comfortable... scared, satisfied

I could use more "grace period", frankly, before major disruption hits.

My life changes are not complete yet - cabin not fully inhabitable, no deer fence up, poor gardening soil, out of money and silver "underwater" at the moment.  I also am not well-integrated into my new village community yet as it's been less than a year off and on here.   I'd like time to learn defence, get in better shape, create more living space on my tiny homestead, get connected with local like minds, find a partner or two, get chickens going and so on.  I'd like my preps done, and time to think about the people around me more.

On the up side, I have a village homestead, (not that urban condo of last year), there are many fruit trees in the ground and a lasagne garden started, the cabin is almost there and I know people with awesome soil who need gardeners this season.  There's money out of the bank and some physical I can get my hands on if needed.  The water here is superb and my sandy soil has excellent exposure.  I have wonderful mentors with off the charts skills, and a few friends who are up to speed.  There's been time to have the "Crash Course" talk with many close friends and though most of them don't get much traction (action) with it, they will be a little ahead because their minds have had that first exposure.  Some are reading Chris' book now.

As important, it has been an astonishing learning curve the last 2 years, for heart and spirit as well as mind.  With the help of thinkers like Chris Martenson and many others, layer on layer of unaware assumption about my civilization and its planet-home has been sandblasted away (more to go!).  It is deeply satisfying to finally get down to what might be true.  I was so weary from ignoring the emperor's nakedness.... And here in the grace period at least, I can register how fabulously blessed I have been so far.  Though I am entirely preoccupied with things to do, and often not very happy with the work or my progress, a sense of blessedness is not far from my heart. 

Were we not all simply gifted with water, sunlight, mountains, snow, the oceans and plains of the world, the company of the plant family and of many fine creatures (some of them human!), adventures of every sort and a body to have them in?  Are we not the possessors of amazing minds and intense, powerful inner worlds?   Has this not been an outrageous wealth?  Do we not benefit from and love all these gifts like we love our lives?   So, though my mind and emotions are agitated and unready, my soul is satisfied. 

Now, let me remember this while I get back to work on that blinkin' cabin and attend to the upcoming end of the dollar!

Thanks for the question Travlin.  Love to hear the answers of others. 

Susan

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planting planting planting

   I  just keeping on planting seeds ...  hauling  manure ... pulling weeds  etc.   Feeding the calves , feed the chickens , feed the rabbits  ,feed  the family .   There is just so much one CAN do !!  Doing the best with what we have .   The fruit trees are LOADED as well as the grape vines , berry bushes , nut trees and such .   

   Because  we personally went the way of the world years ago and have some debt   we have to pay the piper ...Our Paychecks will not increase so  our Debt will slooooowly  go away .    Looking at every little thing that we can cut back so to put money and effort into self sufficiency .      For us this will not be some great  jack pot  to save the day .   It is what it is .  Our worry is not going to change a thing .

   Doing unto  our neighbors as we would have them do unto us ....  it is well  with my soul  and I WILL count it all joy  .  

FM 

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Feeling strangely excited

I joined this forum years ago, a new mother and concerned world citizen.  Then I was overwhelmed and frightened.  Now I am pretty excited about seeing. How this is all going to work.  I feel considerably more trusting and calm than I did then.  It's like when I was in college and studying for an exam.  My friends would all look at me cross eyed when I would leave to go to bed.  There is only so much you can do to prepare.  After that, we must do our best to take care of ourselves and be good people.  This has taken a long time for me to fully embody.  Sorry about the typos.  Can't fix them on this silly machine.Anyhow it's just exhausting to try to prepare for unknowable circumstances.  So now I just let it all wash over me, and act when I can see an appropriate moment.

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surprise, yes, thats what i

surprise, yes, thats what i feel. constant surprise that sheeple trust "the" system. alarmed?no. I trust Dogs will find the source of what i suspect to be critter feces on the peach. I trust my farm to sustain me and mine. the sun will rise and weather will occur. I think I'll meet Safewrite for coffee.

robie, husband father farmer optometrist

Ready's picture
Ready
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Good read

I found the post to be typical CM. Clear and concise and a bit predictive.

When I first logged in to CM, I was positive "the crash" was imminent. To the point that I didn't like extending credit to my customers because I didn't want my goods and my money in their hands when the bank holiday hit. Looking back - pretty dumb. Being overly cautious cost me business. Or I'd take a credit card and waste 3.5% just to get the money now. Dumb dumb dumb. This is just one example of many where fear drove the wrong behaviors in me.

Fear can be a wonderful motivator. It's why we evolved to have it. When the t-rex and the sabertooth giant sloth are attacking the den, you gotta fight or flight to survive.

Unfortunately, fear can also cloud judgement and force mistakes. I know I have made many many mistakes out of a fear reaction.

We have all been blessed by the FED with many more years of "normalcy." Many more than I would have ever believed. It would be very easy to fall into the 2008 trap again that the sky is falling, run and hide, or do something short sighted. Not gonna do it.

It's good to put things in perspective. As a good example, re-read Robbie's post above.

What I have learned is this: predicitons fail and nothing ever works in the timeline or the way you have set out for it.

This is our lives that we are living. Right now, today, this second. It's easy to get consumed by this stuff, and if you started back in 2008 and this is all you did, you would have "lost" several years of your life. I'm not saying to forget prepping, just don't forget that today is an equal 24hour segment of your life compared to the day before you became aware of our predicament.

There are no solutions, only outcomes. Best to internalize that and be OK with it or you will drive yourself batty.

Best

R

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Still goin steady

I own a few guns and a few dozen ounces of silver. I'm finishing my degree. I've wondered if the next crash will be in the next year or years from now. Sounds like within a year, then.

Nothing I'm doing is changing. It is nice to try and have some kind of feel for timing.

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thanks, Ready

Ready wrote:

This is our lives that we are living. Right now, today, this second. It's easy to get consumed by this stuff, and if you started back in 2008 and this is all you did, you would have "lost" several years of your life. I'm not saying to forget prepping, just don't forget that today is an equal 24hour segment of your life compared to the day before you became aware of our predicament.

There are no solutions, only outcomes. Best to internalize that and be OK with it or you will drive yourself batty.

This is a good reminder for me. Seems everytime I have a thought in my head ... I just need to do *this* ... the relief it brings me when done is temporary before I'm off thinking, now I need to do "that." 4 to 5 years of this takes its toll on you and you find yourself unable to enjoy the small things in life. 

~ s

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Feeling Less, Doing More

To take a snapshot in time this post kept me up til midnight and I wandered into my IRA and took some steps that I'd been hemming & hawing about.  Imagine the scene - late night computer screen glow on the face of a worried father & husband...and one voice says "you should never make trades when you're tired and upset and worried" and the other voice says "dammit - how many times do we need to walk up to the cliff?  Do you trust these markets or not? Are you in or out?"   ~ But today's outlook is one of relief, for having taken action.  I'm now free to move on to the next thing...one less thing on the To Do list.    

Concur with an earlier post that emotions make poor bedfellows when dealing in markets & investing, but at some point I just reach that ENOUGH! moment and begin to take action.   The CM.com site offers what you might say is a calm approach to a dire subject.  Flipping channels over to TruthNeverTold or ZeroHedge and one can feel the anger begin to furl one's brown - they should make Mouse Meters to measure one's stress while at a computer terminal!  "Chris' latest post registered a 7 on my Mouse Meter!!!   According to the (supposed) Mouse Meter handy cross reference computer placard one should not make epic decisions with a reading of 6 or above."  

We are truly thankful we found this website about 7 months ago.  I probably spent too much time trying to convince friends & family that I discovered something profoud, insightful and potentially frightful at times, and that they needed to interrupt their lives to dig into this.  Guess I needed affirmation as I struggled to get it and then relay it.   I think I've come a long way in understanding and and ability to tell the story.  I'm finding - as Chris pointed out from his own journey - that there's peace and joy in the doing.   It's a trap to spend too much time in the sometimes worrysome blogosphere.   

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Damnthematrix
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I'm with Dogs.......

I'm with Dogs.......  Honestly, the one thing that's astonished me most about all this stuff is how slowly it's all happening.  I was aware TSWHTF long before I found this site.  Chris "merely" joined all the dots for me, and I learned what FIAT money was, and quite a few other things.  So I'm luckier than most, I've been prepping for ten years now, and I'm still waiting for the Matrix to collapse...

About a month ago, I bought a four cylinder pickup the previous owner stopped loving.  He's the neighbour of one of my converts, who refuses to believe the three Es.  He came home in the ute (Orstrayan for pickup) one night, said to his wife "the aircon's not working" and bought a new ute.  Turned out all that was wrong was the belt came off the pulley!  He convinced himself the vehicle had reached its used by date, and just parked it outside....  said I could have it for $800.  I didn't have $800 lying around, so he just left it there, for about a year.  I think the neighbours must've started complaining about the unloved machine parked outside their place, and told my friend he was going to get it towed away.  So I got a call from said friend who said, give him a couple of hundred bucks, and it's yours.  So I took it.

I just registered it for road use yesterday, cost me $800 on the road, for everything; it's all cleaned up and looks like new, purrs like a kitten too.  Best buy I've ever spent money on.  Talk about throw away society......  I could sell it tomorrow for $3,500, piece of cake I reckon.

Over the next couple of years or three, hopefully in Tasmania, I'll convert it to electric.

No point putting your life on hold just because there's a Greek Tragedy going on half way 'round the world.

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Ready
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Saffron,

;)

That piece of land next to my farm is still for sale....

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Travlin
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Welcome

Sangria123 wrote:

We are truly thankful we found this website about 7 months ago.  I probably spent too much time trying to convince friends & family that I discovered something profoud, insightful and potentially frightful at times, and that they needed to interrupt their lives to dig into this.  Guess I needed affirmation as I struggled to get it and then relay it.

Sangria

Welcome to the forums.  Many of us have been in the same position.  Most people don't want to hear about it.  Fortunately there are people here you can discuss these matters with.

Travlin 

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Sounds good

Doug wrote:

My financial assets are split about evenly between PMs and commercial bonds at the moment.  The bonds are in a 401k fund so my options are limited, but I think I will put them in the US bond fund, which I see as cash equivalent at the moment.  Any critique of that strategy is welcome.

Doug

That sounds like a good plan for now.  I would try for a US Treasury bond fund and avoid the governmental agency bonds like Freddie, Fanny, etc.  One day interest rates will rise and all bond funds will fall in value, so plan for an alternative.  I'd carefully research the soundness of your employer, the 401k plan, and administrator.  I'd also want to know all options for getting out if need be.  I know most plans are very restrictive and have limited investments to choose from.  Good luck.

Travlin

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What am I doing?

I'm going to spend all day busting my hind end on a project with my Homestead peeps (new/expanded goat barn to accommodate the kids that are about to get born).

Then I'm deejaying a dance party tonight.  

And I will be keeping one ear/eyeball on the doings in Europe...in case I perhaps need to pull some cash outta the bank or something come Monday.

I guess I'm a healthy mix of the practical, tactical, and recreational.

Viva -- Sager

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At some point in the next

At some point in the next couple of weeks I want to buy the long term storage seeds....but the list of things I should be doing is severely limited due to a very strapped money situation.  We just aren't in the right place with our jobs/funds to do 90% of what we want to be doing.  One thing at a time. One prep at a time. And the universe will unfold as it may.

robie robinson's picture
robie robinson
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seed?

anything in the leguminosae family will be sustainable and many are easy to grow,harvest,nutrtious and store. I'm particularly fond of the "Top Pick Pink Eye Purplehull Pea".

robie

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Jbarney

I am far from a gardener, but here is my thought.

I bought one can of the survival seeds and keep in in my refrigerator, but after thinking things over I decided that it would be better to find seeds that are intended to grow in my local area and to practice growing them.

For the long term I will buy a couple year's worth of extra seeds of each type that I am successful in growing, seal them in a mylar bag and keep them in the refrigerator.  I will also practice saving seeds from each harvest.  Note that some plants have a two year seed collecting cycle.

It might be good to have a can or two of the generic seeds, but if you are planning on cracking the can open and planting in an emergency without practicing first and knowing that the seeds are good for your area you are leaving a lot to chance.

Joe 

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thanx Travlin

Travlin wrote:

Doug wrote:

My financial assets are split about evenly between PMs and commercial bonds at the moment.  The bonds are in a 401k fund so my options are limited, but I think I will put them in the US bond fund, which I see as cash equivalent at the moment.  Any critique of that strategy is welcome.

Doug

That sounds like a good plan for now.  I would try for a US Treasury bond fund and avoid the governmental agency bonds like Freddie, Fanny, etc.  One day interest rates will rise and all bond funds will fall in value, so plan for an alternative.  I'd carefully research the soundness of your employer, the 401k plan, and administrator.  I'd also want to know all options for getting out if need be.  I know most plans are very restrictive and have limited investments to choose from.  Good luck.

Travlin

Unfortunately, I don't have the option to pick which gov't bonds are in the fund.  I'm a US gov't employee and the program is the gov't's version of a 401k.  I'm just trying to preserve value for 4 more months until I retire and can pull it all out and put it elsewhere.  I can borrow on the fund.  That's an option I should explore.

Doug

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Sager wrote: I guess I'm a

Sager wrote:

I guess I'm a healthy mix of the practical, tactical, and recreational.

Sager, I want to be you when I grow up! (Tho' Xena is still a strong contender!:)

joe wrote:

I am far from a gardener, but here is my thought.

I bought one can of the survival seeds and keep in in my refrigerator, but after thinking things over I decided that it would be better to find seeds that are intended to grow in my local area and to practice growing them.

For the long term I will buy a couple year's worth of extra seeds of each type that I am successful in growing, seal them in a mylar bag and keep them in the refrigerator.  I will also practice saving seeds from each harvest.  Note that some plants have a two year seed collecting cycle.

It might be good to have a can or two of the generic seeds, but if you are planning on cracking the can open and planting in an emergency without practicing first and knowing that the seeds are good for your area you are leaving a lot to chance.

Joe 

Joe, this is exactly what I have done the last 3 or so years, and it has been a very valuable learning experience.  As any of the people who are accomplished gardeners/farmers on this site can tell you (and I'm not one of them!:), there is an incredible amount to learn.  Much of it is trial and error and experience over time, so the sooner you start accumulating experience, the better. 

I learned so much about what crops grow well in my area and soil (I'm in the northeast US), and what do not (at least for me).  E.g., things that did not grow well for for me (and it may just be my lack of proper treatemnent) included: navy beans and soy beans.  Broccoli and corn grew for me, but seemed to take up so much space in my small garden for the amount of output, that I don't know if they are worth it. 

But other things have thrived, and have taught me they have a potential place in building up food resiliency: black beans (productive like crazy), potatoes, asparagus (what beats a perrenial green veg first thing every spring?), swisschard, and black currants (vit C) are among the plants doing very very well.  Currants are somewhat bitter tasting compared to the sweet berries we are used to (blueberries, etc.).  But they absolutely thrive in my yard -they bore fruit the first season- and have significant vitamin and medicinal value*.  So there you go.

Then there are all those other pesky thing to learn about, like watering, care & feeding,  maintaining plant health (from insect, diseases, etc.), pruning, harvesting, preserving....  it is a lot of work, and there is a lot to learn about the rhythm of it all, and getting things done and done right in the timeframe available.  I've been better at learning the front end of it all, but am still sorely lacking still in learning the storing/preserving side of things (the price of trying to live 2 lives at once -.the old and the new!)

Learn while you can, and while the cost and consequences of mistakes are low.

Best of luck,

pinecarr

*

"Black currants are berries that grow on a small shrub that is native to Europe and northern Asia. Also known as cassis, the fruit is high in vitamin C. In fact, during World War II when citrus was in short supply on the home front, residents of Great Britain were encouraged to grow blackcurrants in their garden so they wouldn't miss this important nutrient. Used externally as well as taken internally for its obvious nutritional value, this a very important herbal medicine.'

http://www.digherbs.com/black-currant.html 

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I used to burn alot of energy trying to convince people too. .

Now, if they seem like contemplative people, I give the the site and a hearty recommendation.  Then I go away.  If they come back to me later. . .I help them through the 7 stages.

We have a strong group of like minded people, lots of land, and lots of preps.  I have resolved to live each day as a blessing and enjoy my kids and the good things in life.  When the meltdown starts in earnest, I can refocus on those last little dips into crazy that I have been putting off.  Till then I read the news and chuckle to myself.

Rector

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Priorities

I think a lot of people who are "aware" - including me - have (or have had) the wrong priorities.

For a long time, since 2007, I was overly worried about my retirement savings and trying to buy THINGS to prepare, and what would happen if I lost my job.

But I recently realized that I need to follow Aaron Moyer's emphasis (see his post about Every Day Carry - EDC). Yes, things are important. Investments are important. But my primary focus - and where I should expend the most amount of time and effort - is to work on building skills, experience, and physical abilities FIRST. Then supplement with the proper tools to augment those skills - as I would know better.

I sure could become more physically fit, increase my stamina and strength. I sure could increase my skills in situational awareness, first aid, self-defense, shooting skills, gardening, foraging, scrounging, haggling, jury-rigging, mechanical repair. These are never-ending skills that take practice and experience to build.

THEN I would know the tools and equipment and supplies and possible store of wealth I would need to have on hand, have by me, cover weaknesses, etc.

Gold and silver and investments are a priority, but they really are not the immediate priority and I should not spend more time on thinking about them or worrying about them.

Besides, if you have the skills and can survive, you may as well come across someone who would trade you a gold coin or his wife's wedding ring for some food or a tool. Farmers during the hyper-inflationary Weimar Republic had it good. In one book I read, one traded a few sacks of potatoes for a grand piano. Gonzalo Lira has tells a story about someone in Chile getting an apartment for a working used car. A community member here, who lived through the fall of the Soviet Union, mentioned how her family traded some herloom silverware passed down for generations for a garden plot, and grew potatoes and other vegetables that were much, much more valuable to them for food and trade.

Yes, you'll need some precious metals. They are a portable form of wealth, after all. You'll likely be saving your gold and silver for the doctor who can operate on your family member. (In fact, if I were a doctor, I wouldn't bother to save much gold or silver at all. I'd make sure I first had portable sterilizing equipment and surgical kits - especially tools that don't rely on electricity - and know how to use them. The gold and food and goods will follow.)

I'm thinking inertia is a big thing, we may yet see more years like the past few. Make hay while the sun shines. That's what I'm thinking.

Poet

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not a holdng pattern

I'm not going to call it a yawn, but neither was our reaction panic. When we saw the alert we just made sure we had our tank topped off and some extra cash in case of a bank holiday. Other than that, we're to the point where it was business as usual.

We keep doing what we've been doing for years: work on our overall health, work on our small secuity concerens (a newer door here, a solar LED spot light there, a chain and key lock for a gate), make sure our tools are good quality, require little or no power, and are maintained; we add new veggies or weed a raised bed, or work on our gardening skills. By now, rotating our first aid, pantry, and bulk food* purchases is a habit.

Are we done with all we'd like to do? No, but we do the best we can and chip away at the list. We have detailed plans for chickens and to finish the food forest and to plant some asparagus. We want to make the raised beds deeper. We will chip away at theose plans. We have no control over whether the S hitting the fan is a slow crash or a fast one, whether it's creeping inflation, hyperinflation, deflation, or some outre thing like aplague or EMP. But we're deeply satisfied with our incremental changes in the right direction, as there is only so much we can do every day. 

It's a typical day here. We had green beans and carrots from the garden yesterday and today it will be a salad and a barley stew from garden and larder ingredients. I am researching homemade bread recipies and how to press olive oil (our olive tree sapling is a week old, but it gives me time to look for equiment or materials).  I'm watering the olive sapling, the new peach tree, and the new grapes - grapes which were further trained onto their trellis. I checked the not-quite ripe blueberries and figs . . . I'm gearing up for the canning season, and have some extra jars and (especially) lids on my shopping list. The new strawberries were trying to grow outside their bed and I laid the runners back in the box.

Why do I bring these details up? Because I want to illustrate something. 'We're not in a holdng pattern - we are in the process of  implementing a lifesyle change. When TSHTF it will be like gettng pregnant or dying: it will come at an inconventient time. We'll all do the best we can, and adding to our stress by worrying in the short term is not going to help our health in the long term. At least, that's my view on things.

(*hint - it i is easier to tell relatives you cook with bulk foods because they are healthier and cheaper than it is to get them to understand that you have a small deep larder.)

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spot on

safewrite wrote:

Why do I bring these details up? Because I want to illustrate something. 'We're not in a holdng pattern - we are in the process of  implementing a lifesyle change. When TSHTF it will be like gettng pregnant or dying: it will come at an inconventient time. We'll all do the best we can, and adding to our stress by worrying in the short term is not going to help our health in the long term. At least, that's my view on things.

(*hint - it i is easier to tell relatives you cook with bulk foods because they are healthier and cheaper than it is to get them to understand that you have a small deep larder.)

Very well put.  No one knows how this will unravel, so continue the lifestyle change.  Which reminds me, I need more firewood.

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not a holding pattern

Nate wrote:

Very well put.  No one knows how this will unravel, so continue the lifestyle change.  Which reminds me, I need more firewood.

Funny isn't it.....  used my new pickup yesterday to get firewood.  A friend told me a local sawmill is selling offcuts at the rate of twenty bucks for as much as your vehicle will handle!  I thought it might've been a bit too green to use in the AGA, but it burns smokelessly....  good old Aussie hardwood!  Can't beat Eucalyptus for energy.

Mike

ao's picture
ao
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2009
Posts: 2220
chop wood, carry water

Had an epiphany in recent days.  Work has been very slow and I was getting concerned about that.  I have enough to retire but I'd like to build up a cushion to help my kids secure a better future, if needed.  Then I started re-examining the situation and the old adage that every crisis presents an opportunity.  The one thing I've never had enough of is free time.  Well, I've had more free time as of late and rather than scurrying hither and thither and doing this and that, I realized that it was time for some quiet, still, spiritual introspection.  And once again, the realization that this whole global crisis is essentially spiritual in nature came to light.  The Es are just a reflection of that and nothing more.  I had lunch with a friend who is a Buddhist and we had a great discussion about this very issue.  I had a family vacation coming up that I was beginning to stress about because of its cost, time away from work, etc.  Well, I went on vacation anyway (money and time be damned) and resolved myself not to think of work, finances, the news, the internet, or any other area of attention that would detract from being fully present and enjoying the vacation.  Truthfully, it was one of the best vacations I've ever had.  My mind and body calmed down and allowed me to enjoy the richness and beauty of this world, live in the moment, and let go of the fear.  The world is what we make of it.  If we chose to live in fear, we'll get just that.  If we embrace the beauty, love, peace, and joy of the earth and the people who live here, we'll get more of that.  I'm prepped as far as is reasonable and any more would begin to enter into the realm of the neurotic and I chose not to go there.  My Buddhist friend was telling me about his sister who has 40,000 gallons of propane stored in underground tanks, more weapons and ammo than a National Guard Armory, old EMP-proof vehicles, and grows every kind of food imaginable, etc., etc., but still she and her family have no peace.  I'm interested in living, not surviving.  And I'm not interested in getting caught up in the frenzies and worries of the world and blown this way and this by this opinion and that prediction.  You do what is reasonable and prudent to do and then move on and enjoy life.  As I've said in the past, you prepare for the worst but also prepare for the best.  That which is suitable for both is that which I will do.  And in preparation for life, as well as for death, the spirit takes precedence over the mind which takes precedence over the body.        

TreeGap's picture
TreeGap
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 27 2012
Posts: 23
Peace

ao wrote:

Had an epiphany in recent days.  Work has been very slow and I was getting concerned about that.  I have enough to retire but I'd like to build up a cushion to help my kids secure a better future, if needed.  Then I started re-examining the situation and the old adage that every crisis presents an opportunity.  The one thing I've never had enough of is free time.  Well, I've had more free time as of late and rather than scurrying hither and thither and doing this and that, I realized that it was time for some quiet, still, spiritual introspection.  And once again, the realization that this whole global crisis is essentially spiritual in nature came to light.  The Es are just a reflection of that and nothing more.  I had lunch with a friend who is a Buddhist and we had a great discussion about this very issue.  I had a family vacation coming up that I was beginning to stress about because of its cost, time away from work, etc.  Well, I went on vacation anyway (money and time be damned) and resolved myself not to think of work, finances, the news, the internet, or any other area of attention that would detract from being fully present and enjoying the vacation.  Truthfully, it was one of the best vacations I've ever had.  My mind and body calmed down and allowed me to enjoy the richness and beauty of this world, live in the moment, and let go of the fear.  The world is what we make of it.  If we chose to live in fear, we'll get just that.  If we embrace the beauty, love, peace, and joy of the earth and the people who live here, we'll get more of that.  I'm prepped as far as is reasonable and any more would begin to enter into the realm of the neurotic and I chose not to go there.  My Buddhist friend was telling me about his sister who has 40,000 gallons of propane stored in underground tanks, more weapons and ammo than a National Guard Armory, old EMP-proof vehicles, and grows every kind of food imaginable, etc., etc., but still she and her family have no peace.  I'm interested in living, not surviving.  And I'm not interested in getting caught up in the frenzies and worries of the world and blown this way and this by this opinion and that prediction.  You do what is reasonable and prudent to do and then move on and enjoy life.  As I've said in the past, you prepare for the worst but also prepare for the best.  That which is suitable for both is that which I will do.  And in preparation for life, as well as for death, the spirit takes precedence over the mind which takes precedence over the body.        

Well said. 

When a friend of mind died on 9/11, I was devastated.  Ten long years went by and I watched all kinds of weird things happen in my country.  Just after the tenth anniversary, I began acting on that nagging feeling that something wasn't right.  By November, I'd found this site & was feeling really nervous about everything... and, my decision-making became paralyzed.  

All I could see was trouble ahead.

Just yesterday, I decided to sell what could be deemed an ideal "farmstead."  The proceeds will make me debt-free.  I'll be consigned to renting for a while, perhaps forever.  But, I decided not to fear that & to stop being afraid.  I'm placing my bet on doing my best & having faith in that.

For over a decade, I've been living in fear of the other shoe dropping.  Lots of shoes have dropped.  And, somehow, I dealt with it.  

I like the advice I've seen here.... to keep on doing what you're doing & take the bad news in stride.  That is the key to enjoying the Life you have.

Lnorris's picture
Lnorris
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 28 2011
Posts: 100
Wise words from Lord of the Rings

Frodo - "I wish the ring had never come to me. I wish none of this had happened"

Gandalf - "So do all who live to see such times, but that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us."

True words that carry deep meaning for me as I walk this path to a different way of life.

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
Status: Martenson Brigade Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 4 2009
Posts: 2484
FWIW....

Standing ovation for posts #27, 28 and 29. 

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