A Gift of Reconciliation

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gillbilly's picture
gillbilly
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2012
Posts: 383
A Gift of Reconciliation

The most recent issue of Parabola magazine had an article on the documentary Dakota 38 which inspired me to watch it. Even more amazing is this film is being given free as a gift to the world. You can download it here:

http://www.smoothfeather.org/index.php

It is a very moving film (have lots of tissues on hand) that relates to the message of PP. It takes awhile to download, but I highly recommend it.

gillbilly's picture
gillbilly
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2012
Posts: 383
More info...

Now that I read my preface, I thought I should give a little more information on this film. The documentary is a film that chronicles a horseback ride that took place in 2008 by Dakota Native Americans. They ride 330 miles from the S. Dakota to Mankato, MN, where the largest mass execution by the U.S. government happened by order of Abraham Lincoln on Dec. 26, 1862.  The film is filled with PP message, i.e. the power of govt. and how they denied Native Americans their rights… during the civil war, the uprising of the Dakotas in reaction to their starvation and the outcome, how they still grapple with what happened to this day, and the havoc it wreaked on their culture. I couldn’t help but feel the irony of how TPTB at that time dealt with the Dakotas and how it applies (or possibly apply) to our time. I know it’s a different time and different context, but there are parallels. The beautiful part of the film is the message of healing of the modern day Dakotas. Will we be as forgiving in the future? Here is the description of the film from the website:

In the spring of 2005, Jim Miller, a Native spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, found himself in a dream riding on horseback across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in United States history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on December 26, 1862. "When you have dreams, you know when they come from the creator... As any recovered alcoholic, I made believe that I didn't get it. I tried to put it out of my mind, yet it's one of those dreams that bothers you night and day."

Now, four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. "We can't blame the wasichus anymore. We're doing it to ourselves. We're selling drugs. We're killing our own people. That's what this ride is about, is healing." This is the story of their journey- the blizzards they endure, the Native and Non-Native communities that house and feed them along the way, and the dark history they are beginning to wipe away.

No need to reply to this, but hope you enjoy the documentary.

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