Canned Diced Roasted Green Chiles replacement

jasonw
By jasonw on Fri, Mar 1, 2013 - 6:12pm

Does anyone know what type of pepper companies use for canned diced green chiles?  They are typically really mild. I am looking to grow, roast, and can my own this season and I am curious to see if anybody has some feedback on what I might try.  Ancho or anaheim perhaps?  We currently have 11 varieties of peppers started but I want to make sure I get the right type started before I run out of time.  Your comments are greatly appreciated.

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9 Comments

Thrivalista's picture
Thrivalista
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 5 2011
Posts: 40
Anaheims, usually. I'd be

Anaheims, usually. I'd be interested to hear what you learn about successfully canning densely-packed peppers.

ptwisewoman's picture
ptwisewoman
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Joined: Nov 18 2008
Posts: 56
green chiles

The photo on the can appears to be a jalapeno.  Anaheims are hotter than jalapenos and jalapenos are generally hotter than anchos.  Anchos are a good bit bigger than anaheims or jalapenos.  Peppers aren't hard to can.  Much like pickles without the pickling spices.  I've dried, canned and put up in the freezer.  I dry those I plan on adding to soups; anchos, jalapenos and green peppers and those I use for seasoning like cayenne.  I freeze those I plan to stuff, and if I'm really trying to plan ahead, I stuff them then freeze.  I generally only can jalapenos, peppercini and banana peppers.

Thrivalista's picture
Thrivalista
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Posts: 40
*Which* green chili, and how to can 'em?
According to wikipedia, Anaheims rank lower in Scoville heat units than Jalapeños, and Poblanos (Anchos before they're dried) rank about the same as Anaheims.  The chili shown on the can image above has a pointed, slightly curved tip, consistent with Anaheims.  Jalapeños have a rounded but "straight" (not curved to one side) end. (We've grown both for years.)
 
And then there's this:
Q.: What type of chiles does Ortega use?

A.: Ortega uses the green chile commonly known as Anaheim Chiles that originated in New Mexico and [were] introduced to southern California in 1894 by Emilio C. Ortega.

Re canning them at home: packing them in vinegar would make home-canning safer, but for those who prefer their chilies without the vinegar taste, here's a link to directions from the New Mexico State University extension for canning green chilies. The directions call for "loosely" packing them prior to pressure-canning. http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/E-308.pdf

For some strange reason, I'm getting a craving for salsa. ;)

glober00's picture
glober00
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Posts: 2
Geen Chiles

This chiles on the can are actually Anaheims  That variety are quite mild; 1,000 - 2,500 on the Scoville scale.  Jalapenos are 3,500 - 8,000, as some of the New Mexican varieties of Anaheims.

The Scoville Scale converts the amount of capsaicin in parts per million into Scoville heat units. So the greater the number of Scoville Scale, the hotter the pepper.

   
Name Scoville Rating
   
Pure capsaicin 16,000,000
Nordihydrocapsaicin 9,100,000
Homodihydrocapsaicin 8,600,000
Police grade pepper spray 5,300,000
Common pepper spray 2,000,000
Red Savina habanero 350,000 - 580,000
Habanero chile 100,000 - 350,000
Scotch bonnet 100,000 - 325,000
Birds eye pepper 100,000 - 225,000
Jamaican hot pepper 100,000 - 200,000
Carolina cayenne pepper 100,000 - 125,000
Bahamian pepper 95,000 - 110,000
Tabiche pepper 85,000 - 115,000
Thai pepper 50,000 - 100,000
Chiltepin pepper 50,000 - 100,000
Piquin pepper 40,000 - 58,000
Super chile pepper 40,000 - 50,000
Santaka pepper 40,000 - 50,000
Cayenne pepper 30,000 - 50,000
Tabasco pepper 30,000 - 50,000
de Arbol pepper 15,000 - 30,000
Manzano pepper 12,000 - 30,000
Serrano pepper 5,000 - 23,000
Hot wax pepper 5,000 - 10,000
Chipotle 5,000 - 10,000
Jalapeno 2,500 - 8,000
Santaka pepper 2,500 - 8,000
Guajilla pepper 2,500 - 5,000
Rocotilla pepper 1,500 - 2,500
Pasilla pepper 1,000 - 2,000
Ancho pepper 1,000 - 2,000
Poblano pepper 1,000 - 2,000
Coronado pepper 700 - 1,000
Anaheim pepper 500 - 2,500
New Mexico pepper 500 - 1,000
Santa Fe Grande pepper 500 - 700
Pepperoncini pepper 100 - 500
Pimento 100 - 500
Sweet bell pepper 0
rhare's picture
rhare
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 30 2009
Posts: 1271
Seeds are available from the NM Chile Pepper institute.

jasonw wrote:

Does anyone know what type of pepper companies use for canned diced green chilis?

They are probably Anaheims in the cans. Really mild.   Here in NM we go through a lot of green chile (not misspelled), and red chile as well. 

You might be a New Mexican if?  - Note #10 and how many of them relate to chile. :-)

Anyway, a good place to get chile seeds is from the NM Chile Pepper Institue.  Sandia and Big Jim are popular varieties - but there are lots of others.  Big Jim's tend to be meatier and good for green chile, where as Sandia's are better for red.  Here is a catalog.

Thrivalista wrote:

Re canning them at home: packing them in vinegar would make home-canning safer, but for those who prefer their chilies without the vinegar taste, here's a link to directions from the New Mexico State University extension for canning green chilies. The directions call for "loosely" packing them prior to pressure-canning. http://aces.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/E-308.pdf

We don't can it.  The best thing to do for green chile is roast it and freeze it. For red chile we dry them often as a ristra.  However, if you are in a humid part of the country that won't work (they'll mold).  You will need to dry them, then grind them and put them into something to control moisture.

Here is a good article on chile, preparation (see the link to roasting & freezing in the article), and recipes: Red or Green

Enjoy....

ptwisewoman's picture
ptwisewoman
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 18 2008
Posts: 56
I stand corrected

I see there are a few chili heads here.  Either my jalapenos are milder than everyone else's or my anaheims are hotter.  Since I don't buy canned goods from the store and haven't in ages, and apparently my eyesight is a bit off, I'm not surprised I didn't see the details on the chili.  Thanks for the info on scovilles. Sharon

glober00's picture
glober00
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Joined: Jan 16 2012
Posts: 2
Chile

I live in the far northwest corner of Washington and although we don't have the humidity like some parts of the country, it does rain more than a few days per year.

Last fall we bought a bunch of various types of chiles at the local produce stand end-of-season closeout.  The thought was to keep then in a cool dry place for as long as we could.  Within 2 weeks we started to get mold on one chile.  We could have put them in a jar and vacuum sealed them, but instead we sliced them up and put them our dehydrator.  Really cool smell in the house as they were drying.  When they wre done, put in seperate ziplok bags (there were four different varieties.  They are still perfect.

Thanks for source of seeds Jason.

rhare's picture
rhare
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 30 2009
Posts: 1271
Ahhh - the smell of chile roasting... YUM!

glober00 wrote:

Really cool smell in the house as they were drying.

You should try to make a vist to NM in the fall (Sept-Oct).  Every grocery store and the chile vendors around the city are set up with large propane roasters.  As you drive by the smell is wonderful. :-)  You just buy how many bushels you want, then haul it outside and they roast it for you.

In the fall you may be able to find a roaster near you. It's been exported a lot more in the last few years. I have friends in Houston, Austin, and in California that have reported chile roasting set ups list this one:

jasonw's picture
jasonw
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 17 2011
Posts: 797
Thanks everyone for the

Thanks everyone for the feedback, tips, and links to new resources.  Looks like I have the varieties I will need to put away some good chiles this year.  We actually went a little crazy and grew enough plants to sell to some local folks.  The Fresno seed from 2006 seems to be finally done - not a single plant started. Looking forward to some nice goat cheese filled, bacon wrapped, oven roasted chile poppers though.  With a glass of chardonnay and an evening walk through the garden.  Summer is a wonderful time of year.  Cheers!

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