Chris on TV - Channel 5 Boston's "Chronicle"

Adam Taggart
By Adam Taggart on Fri, Dec 21, 2012 - 8:17pm

Last night, Chris appeared on Channel 5 Boston TV's news magazine, "Chronicle."

The program focused on people preparing for an uncertain future. Given that the air date was scheduled to coincide with the last day of the Mayan calendar, we were feeling a little vulnerable that the news stream might decide to paint Chris as some kind of bunker-digging prophet of apocalypse (it's happened before)

But the Chronicle team did quite a nice job, IMO.

They captured many of the high notes of Chris' message and gave particular focus to the practical and positive approach that we all pursue here at PeakProsperity.com.

Have a look for yourself (click on the image below and wait for player to load):

It's good to see Chris (and other Pioneer Valley residents!) get air time in a major media market. We are working to see if we can make that happen with growing regularity in 2013.

We're observing that more media outlets are finally beginning to be able to engage with our material without fear of immediate ridicule, as so much of what Chris has foretold has now come to pass (I guess that's what a popped housing bubble, $100/barrel oil, a Great Recession, and $2 trillion in thin-air money will do for you). Perhaps next year will be the one when the masses finally prick up their ears...

16 Comments

treebeard's picture
treebeard
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Great story

Very positive for the mainstream. I was expecting it to be negative around the edges, but no, great story.

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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TeeVee Special

Thank you.  I worked very hard to assure that only non-corruptible messages came out of my mouth...and we really pressed the producers to not pull a "Boston Mag" on us.  

It seems that the idea that things might really be different now is settling in...at least to the masses.  Politicians and central bankers not included yet in that statement.

ao's picture
ao
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well done

An excellent, accurate, concise, and meaningful message.  Well done!  It's amazing the MSM seemed to leave the essential message intact and distortion free.  This short clip is something that can be sent to family, friends, and aquaintances that will grab briefer attention spans and convey an effective message without either scaring them, overwhelming them, or boring them.  I'm impressed. 

Nate's picture
Nate
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Well Done^2

Comment and question;

Pulling the carrots out of the ground exposed WONDERFUL soil!  Long ago you mentioned you were sitting on many feet of sand.  How did you build it up to this level so quickly?

Could you provide some detains on the hand pump?  Looks like an outstanding investment to me.

RJE's picture
RJE
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Chris, just a terrific video...

...and all around us we have the expertise of those generational farmers within minutes to bend the ears on when we prepare out how to plan things. Farmers are good at planting and growing and are only so happy to exchange your skill set for food that is their skill set. Sometimes it is enough just to grab a shovel and dig out the barn waste from a few dozen cattle and other animals.

This reminds me of an advertisement I seen from a plumber who proudly stated "that your shit is my bread and butter".  Yesterday I may have been like Yuk! Today I say absolutely, I get this.

This country living isn't a life style for many but it is for us. The open air and room to just breath is what I find very soothing for me. Not many maybe understand what having a coffee without thought as you just stare at nothing yet everything is an amazing stress reliever. I often on cold days as is now the case will leave a forehead print on my atrium door and having been hypnotized at just letting go as I look out at nothing in particular or dream how I will improve or plant my small garden next spring. Just looking at the birds at the bird feeders are an incredible joy.

Well done Professor, short, concise and living large with just effort that is good for you. Nice.

Merry Christmas Chris

BOB

RJE's picture
RJE
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Hi Nate, I read your response and would like to add...

...that while this is a wonderful pump that depending on how far your well is to your home, and what type of winter weather you get that you might want to investigate into having a taller hand pump because snow and drifts in my neck of the woods would be a try and find the pump moment should power go out, and you need to carry your water to the home.

For cooking, drinking, and flushing toilets, and in my area, I found that a four foot pipe extension to be the answer. For visuals sake, and my water location was about 700 feet from my home,  ease of finding my pump in all sorts of weather and snow it sure was nice to get to that water source hassle (relative) free. I know this, the power ALWAYS goes out at 1am in the morning, the temperature is 10 below with wind chill and slogging through the snow is what ends up happening. Seldom is country living an easy and convenient sort of living but if you are robust then no lifestyle is better. I find it invigorating and for the most part very satisfying. Fact is I love it or rather loved it. Unfortunately we moved from a home and 6 acres just outside of a small town in 2002, and I didn't want to go but my Lady has her opinions and I value and considered everything. We still have mostly farmers friends and hunting friends. They actually are one in the same so we look out for each others. We look at it as having the best of both worlds frankly. Over time we corrected some things with water storage containers large enough to just pump from the barn but we still liked our fresh water for drinking, and pumping was how we got it.

Merry Christmas Nate

BOB

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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Truthfully? I bought it.

Nate wrote:

Comment and question;

Pulling the carrots out of the ground exposed WONDERFUL soil!  Long ago you mentioned you were sitting on many feet of sand.  How did you build it up to this level so quickly?

Could you provide some detains on the hand pump?  Looks like an outstanding investment to me.

Um...the soil...truthfully?  I bought it.

Our process was we laid down a layer of cardboard, then successive layers of hatfield loam (a crime that you can even buy it, but apparently there are construction projects on this magnificent soil and they remove it from time to time...I found some for sale and bought two 16 yard trucks worth at ~$500 per load, delivered), compost, and then leaves every fall (from a landscaper...cost is free).

We never step on the beds and each year they get just a little better and a little deeper.  Also I went to a friend's that has been organic gardening for years -- the best soil I've ever seen or smelled -- and took a 5-gallon pail home to innoculate our soil with whatever micro-critter goodness he's built up over the past 15 years in his garden.  I did this after our soil had been worked for a year and a half so it was not a complete raw mess of poorly mixed layers, thinking the innoculant would prefer some slightly seasoned soil.

The real benefit is that the plants get to stick their roots down into the sand as deep as they please so things like beets do extraordinarily well in our garden...carrots. too.  They love being able to run freely downwards.

Also we get great results from pretty much everything....last year was just as bountiful as all get out.

RJE's picture
RJE
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Chris, you could have really taken all the credit...

...but as usual you didn't embellish. The soil if amended with yard waste, and over a short period of time, and let nature do what she does best you can create a soil that without hardly any effort you can stick you hand through the soil to 10 to 12".  All our planting now is usually hand or shovel free. Having that sandy base must do wonders for drainage and as you already stated the roots can just go, and that is huge for plants. I will say that your carrot production was envied by me. I can grow them but your crop looked fabulous and I love carrots.

BOB

cmartenson's picture
cmartenson
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And the name of the pump is...

The Simple Pump...very easy to install...took me about an hour and a half.  Not cheap, but should last forever.  Or close enough.  Now I am working out how to power it to feed a small retention pond and maybe to auto-magically water the garden...  Wind?  Solar?  Not sure yet.

Bob, yes the carrots came out good, and that was the second bed.  I direct-seeded that in late July to experiment to see if they would mature right in time to just sit in the ground all winter for a spring pulling. We yanked a few for the cameras, but the rest of the experiment is still running.

After having gardened in the most clay of all soils, this whitish, dense clay in North Carolina, and then for a few years in stony, boney, rocky soil in Mystic CT, and then another heavy dense clay in Bernardston, MA, I am here to report that I vastly prefer working with sand as the starting point.  

It is easier to amend to whatever consistency suits you and the plants are very clear about it...they love it.

The difficulty is keeping the nutrients in and watering during the dry times.  My solutions/experiments there are drip tape watering (triple thumbs up!!!) and biochar (experiment still running, but looks very promising).

earthwise's picture
earthwise
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cmartenson wrote: Nate

cmartenson wrote:

Nate wrote:

Comment and question;

Pulling the carrots out of the ground exposed WONDERFUL soil!  Long ago you mentioned you were sitting on many feet of sand.  How did you build it up to this level so quickly?

Could you provide some detains on the hand pump?  Looks like an outstanding investment to me.

Um...the soil...truthfully?  I bought it.

......... apparently there are construction projects on this magnificent soil and they remove it from time to time...I found some for sale and bought two 16 yard trucks worth at ~$500 per load, delivered), .........

Gives new meaning to the phrase Black Gold. Wonder how long before the banksters trade it through an ETF and manipulate it's price on the Comex.

Nate's picture
Nate
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Posts: 461
from the past

cmartenson wrote:

The Simple Pump...very easy to install...took me about an hour and a half.  Not cheap, but should last forever.  Or close enough.  Now I am working out how to power it to feed a small retention pond and maybe to auto-magically water the garden...wind?  Solar?  Not sure yet.

In the San Joaquin Valley local ranches have historically used windmills to pump water to a tank about 15 feet off the ground.  The water table was and is about 30 feet.  This provided enough pressure and water for the home and a small dairy herd.  When the tank filled, the windmill was manually disconnected from the pump. Our area still has numerous windmills and tankhouses standing, but I have yet to find one that is pumping and storing water. 

tricky rick's picture
tricky rick
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Posts: 74
spot on!

Hi Chris:

nice spot...  going to pass it around to all over the holidays...

Gotta say:  the tv folks let you convey a good message...

two things i liked: the segue from corporate AND the description of the plight of the young grow

into OUR debt!

Always appreciate you and Adam and your good works

tricky

boise

I too have a Simple pump, works well with little to go wrong (that's a plus!)

Assume that's your wife pulling the carrotsand feeding the chickens??

to_be_frank's picture
to_be_frank
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Posts: 10
Cast Iron Hand Pump

For anyone looking for a more traditional cast iron hand water pump, you can obtain them from  www.bakerwatersystems.com/products/water-well-accessories/hand_pumps/hand_pumps/force-pump-stands.  I have the model 11HD, it has served me well for 6 years, and looks great by my Victorian farmhouse.

Poet's picture
Poet
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Posts: 1840
Congratulations and Merry Christmas!

Wow, a beautifully done piece! And I think your message is definitely reaching more receptive ears.

Congratulations and Merry Christmas!

Poet

pinecarr's picture
pinecarr
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Posts: 1573
Really nicely done, Chris

Wow, really nicely done, Chris.  And kudos to the producers at wcvb.com for presenting your message so cleanly.

I wonder, so many people know something is wrong, but don't understand what is going on, what the root(s) of the problem are, or what to do about it.  Maybe more people are finally ready to listen to and hear a narrative that "makes sense" of it all.

Pioneer's picture
Pioneer
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Posts: 60
video on disc or downloadable

I forwarded the video site-link to my network.  It would be great to have it on disc or downloadable to my computer.  It's amazing how short is the attention span of people to anything different, even intelligent, practical people.  Though they would be receptive to the notion of paraigm shift driven by the reality of the three E's and the need for a more empowered, joyous and meaningful life they will not take the time to view the Crash Course, long or short version.  This short video story on Boston TV would be a great taste-sampler to catch their interest, wake them up enough to go further.

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