Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 2/4 - When Smart Is Not So Smart, Breaking The 3,000 Mile Habit

Monday, February 4, 2013, 2:13 PM

Economy

College grads taking more unpaid internships, jobs out of chosen field (Thomas C.)

Grado pointed out that the actual unemployment rate for young adults would have risen to 16.2 percent last month if the declining labor participation – those who have given up looking for work due to the lack of jobs – were accounted for in the statistics.

Stop Changing Your Oil: Breaking The 3,000 Mile Habit (Amanda)

The 3,000-mile myth is also promoted by the quick lube industry's "convenient reminder" windshield sticker. It is a surprisingly effective tool that prompts us to continue following a dictate that our fathers (or grandfathers) drummed into our heads: It's your duty to change your oil every 3,000 miles — or your car will pay the price. But as former service advisor David Langness put it, the 3,000-mile oil change is "a marketing tactic that dealers use to get you into the service bay on a regular basis. Unless you go to the drag strip on weekends, you don't need it."

Dollar Sell Off Within 4 Months: John Williams (Arthur Robey)

"It will be the end of the road ... They are not going to have another opportunity ... they are pushing the limit as it is now." Williams says he expects, "...a negative reaction in the next 3 or 4 months to the dollar." Williams adamantly continues to predict hyperinflation to the U.S. dollar by the end of 2014.

When Smart Is Not So Smart (westcoastjan)

Smart” is one of the iconic words of our times. When the world’s first “smart phone” appeared in 1997, courtesy of Swedish firm Ericsson, the label was carefully chosen to signify an evolutionary leap forward: the transition from a passive tool, used to make and receive calls, to an interactive device offering - in the words of its original packaging - not only an “address book/calendar/notepad” but also the then-miraculous promise of “voice/email/SMS/internet” in one’s pocket.

World's Biggest Retirement Fund Considers Selling Its Japanese Bonds (Time2Help)


The portfolio structure has been broadly unchanged since 2006 when it was formulated with an outlook for consumer prices to rise 1 percent annually. Instead, they have fallen.

“The portfolio was based on a prerequisite of things such as long-term interest rates at 3 percent on average for the next 100 years,” Mitani said. “Whether this is good will be a possible point of discussion.”

Own Physical Gold & Silver As Currency Wars Will Destroy Our Money (Taki T.)

Similarly, for gold and silver, the key question is for how long paper gold and silver (in the form of futures and ETF’s) can control the price. It will be possible until physical demand will take over. Nobody knows how long exactly when it will happen and what the (final) trigger will be. However, one thing is clear: the longer this game goes on, the stronger the reaction afterwards.

Why Buy Silver? (GE Christenson)

In the United States silver was used as money – coins – until the 1960s when inflation in the paper money supply caused the price of silver to rise sufficiently that silver coins were removed from circulation. Do you remember silver dollars? They contained approximately 0.77 ounces of silver. Currently the US Mint produces silver eagles which contain 1.0 ounce of silver – and cost approximately $35.

Energy

Rise in Oil Tax Forces Greeks to Face Cold as Ancients Did (anexaminedlife)

Overnight, the price of heating a small apartment for the winter shot up to about $1,900 from $1,300. "At the beginning of autumn, it was the biggest topic with all my friends: How are we going to heat our places?" said Ms. Pantelemidou, who has had to lower her fees to keep clients. "Now, when I am out walking the dog, I see people with bags picking up sticks. In this neighborhood, really."

Environment

Peak Oil solved, but climate will fry: BP report (Guy M.)

So far the world has warmed around 0.8OC. Already dramatic climate changes are emerging, often decades ahead of worst-case expectations. Extreme droughts, deluges, flooding, storms, crop losses, heat, forest die-off, coral death and ice melting are already well underway. The polar jet stream is weakening and getting "stuck" more often causing unusual storm tracks and long-lasting droughts.

Allodial Title on Land – You Wish You Had This (Chris F.)

If there were a way to opt-out and grant an allodial title to your land, you would not pay any taxes on your home much like on reservations, however you also would not be able to pledge your home as collateral via the traditional routes. Access to traditional bank financing would be nearly impossible, but if you had other means (i.e. family) you could create a very profitable enterprise much like Mystic Lake Casino. Allodial title lands would create competition for non-allodial lands, thus reducing property taxes, and a surge in job creation–something we desperately need. Corporations, instead of going offshore, could go into these special zones whereby they would be granted allodial status to spur domestic job creation.

Bud the Spud moves up North: Farmers battle permafrost to make a go of it in the Northwest Territories (westcoastjan)

He and dozens of other farmers are part of a growing community of farmers living north of 60 and, in some cases, north of the Arctic Circle. They’re joining farming co-operatives, investing in community gardens, purchasing livestock and starting their own small-scale commercial initiatives — to some extent, resurrecting an industry lost when improved transportation links brought a wide variety of food from the south.

Today, many northerners can’t fathom ever being able to eat local.

Gold & Silver

Click to read the Gold & Silver Digest: 2/1/13

Provided daily by the Peak Prosperity Gold & Silver Group

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@peakprosperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

9 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
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KugsCheese's picture
KugsCheese
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 2 2010
Posts: 638
Oil Changes

Any car built after 2000 with a modern engine can go 10K with synthetic oil and quality filter, probably 15K if not racing alot or living in Mexico City.

ao's picture
ao
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2009
Posts: 2220
oil change interval

You can have a standard oil analysis done for $25.00 which will tell you the exact condition of your oil.  This way, there is data backing your oil change decision, not a guess. 

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/what-is-oil-analysis.php

ao's picture
ao
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2009
Posts: 2220
cold starts do the damage

KugsCheese wrote:

Any car built after 2000 with a modern engine can go 10K with synthetic oil and quality filter, probably 15K if not racing alot or living in Mexico City.

Most likely.  The number of cold starts is a more important factor than mileage though.

Doug's picture
Doug
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 2736
Editorial staff??

I would very much like to see a response by the "editorial staff" to this article, linked above:

http://www.vancouverobserver.com/blogs/climatesnapshot/peak-oil-solved-climate-will-fry-bp-report

BP's recently released "BP Energy Outlook 2030" report claims that a dramatic rise in new unconventional sources of oil -- tight oil, tar sands and NGLs -- will solve the "peak oil" problem. These new sources of "oil" are primed to gush forth and allow the world to burn lots more oil for decades to come. BP's chief executive Bob Dudley said bluntly:

"Fears over oil running out – to which BP has never subscribed – appear increasingly groundless."

And it's not just oil. According to BP, a combination of powerful new extraction technologies, growing populations and extremely weak climate policies mean humanity is on track to excavate and burn lots more fossil fuels of all kinds by 2030: 15% more oil, 26% more coal and 46% more methane (aka natural gas). In fact, policies still so strongly favour fossil fuels that BP predicts that two-thirds of all new energy over the next two decades will be supplied by increased fossil fuel burning.

Off the climate cliff

Unfortunately for just about everyone, this "most likely" energy comes with one very big downside. If we do burn that much fossil fuel we will crank the global thermostat up 4OC. And that, scientists say, will inflict climate misery on humanity for thousands of years. Out of the peak oil frying pan and into the raging climate fire. Sorry kids.

The article goes on to some rather remarkable conclusions.  Let us hope the projections of oil supplies are wildly "optimistic."

Doug

westcoastjan's picture
westcoastjan
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 4 2012
Posts: 466
question re oil changes

Can someone please clarify for me something re oil changes?

If a car is used very little, meaning it takes possibly several years to rack up the specified mileage between oil changes, is there any degradation taking place to the oil? The service manager keeps trying to tell me that in spite of the fact that I do not rack up the mileage, I still need to change the oil every six months or so as the chemicals in it degrade and it loses its effectiveness as a lubricant. I am highly skeptical, viewing this as just a ploy to get the car into the service bay.

Can anyone set me straight on this? Thanks!

Jan

phecksel's picture
phecksel
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: May 24 2010
Posts: 144
Jan, More information is

Jan,

More information is needed.  Is the low mileage due to short trips, or periods of inactivity.  Are those trips steady state, i.e. hwy or heavy city driving?

Short trips without being warmed up, or a lot of starting and stopping, go with the 6 mo changes.

Long trips with steady state, you're probably good extending to a year.  In any case, I wouldn't use dealership oil, but would go to name brand synthetic, like penzoil or mobile 1... and that doesn't include Royal Purple.  Personally, I started using a local custom oil blending company.

westcoastjan's picture
westcoastjan
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 4 2012
Posts: 466
mostly inactivity

Hi phecksel,

Thanks for answering. Mostly the car sits due to inactivity. The greatest usage comes from infrequesnt out of town trips. I live in a mild coastal climate. The coldest couple of days this winter were -2 C, but most of the time winter temps average +4-8 C. So those cold starts I used to endure in Calgary @ -25 C are thankfully no longer a factor.

I used to change my own oil using quality products but got away from it the past few years. Perhaps returning to doing that myself using quality products as you suggest will get the service man off my back :)

Appreciate your input!

Jan

phecksel's picture
phecksel
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: May 24 2010
Posts: 144
I started using this guy's

I started using this guy's product.  He's either the greatest snake oil salesman alive, or he really is selling a great product.  He will talk your ear off for as long as you willing to listen :)  He will explain the whole history of zinc phosphate(?) additive and how it was removed from commercial oil and why it should be put back into the product.  In any case, he blends the oil for your specific use.  It's not cheap, but I drank the koolaid.  I'm not in anyway associated with him other then buying his product a couple of times.

http://www.bndautomotive.com/page/page/929427.htm

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