Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 12/7 - The Transparent Supply Chain, Germany's Growth Forecast Cut

Friday, December 7, 2012, 12:34 PM

Economy

A better way to think about chaos and disruption (northernlights)

Centralized institutions worked for us throughout the industrial age because they were an effective way to bring order and stability to economic and social systems. Yes, we had our hiccups, but for the most part they brought us remarkable prosperity.

But today, many of the institutions that we’ve counted on for stability and prosperity are failing us…

Is America Having Enough Babies…Or is it Another Sign We're Turning Japanese? (Arthur Robey)

Here in the United States, our trend is headed in the same direction, where a mere 2.6 workers will be expected to support each retiree by 2050. That's a 44.68% decrease from the 4.7 workers in 2008 -- and a whopping 85.65% reduction from the 42 workers who supported each retiree at the end of WWII.

There are implications in terms of health care rationing, too. It will affect home care, assisted living, traffic, mobility, technology, and taxes. Especially taxes...

Gold Cycle Is Hitting Critical Point In Gold & Silver (Taki T.)

Although the Cycle is now in the timing band for a DCL and gold is oversold, we cannot rule out the possibility that Gold will drop further in a final attempt at breaking the prior Cycle Low. Any Cycle failure at this point would be deemed both a Daily and Investor Cycle failure which sets the scene for another significant 12-16 weeks of declines back down towards the $1,523 level. This type of action seems very unlikely though, considering the Dollar is already into its 12th week and rapidly declining due to its own Daily Cycle failure. Having the Gold and Dollar Cycles fail simultaneously would be extremely unusual, which is why I do not believe it will happen.

'Limits to Growth' Author Dennis Meadows: "Humanity Is Still on the Way to Destroying Itself" (Alan W.)

The fact that the collapse hasn't occurred so far doesn't mean it won't take place in the future. There is no doubt that the world is changing, and we will have to go along with it. There are two ways to do that: One is, you see the necessity of change ahead of time and you make the change, and the second is that you don't and are finally forced to do it anyway. Let's say that you're driving a car inside a factory building. There are two ways to stop: Either you put on the brakes or you keep going and hit the wall. But stop you will, because the building is finite. And the same holds true for Earth's resources.

Greek middle class turns to crime as depression deepens (westcoastjan)

Karagaitanaki’s family can’t afford gas to heat their home this winter and will rely on electric blankets in the chilly northern Greek city. They live on the 785 euros (US$1,027) a month their mother collects monthly from their late father’s pension. Two years ago, Karagaitanaki sold her jewelry for 3,000 euros, which she gave to her two sons. Her blood sugar is rising because she can’t afford the meat and vegetables her doctor recommends and instead eats rice and beans she gets from the Greek Orthodox Church.

“We are waiting every month for my mother’s pension,” Karagaitanaki said. “If my mother dies, what can I do? Everyone here is dependent on their parents’ pensions.”

Phil Matier: Oakland Crime Rate Soaring As City Loses Officers (cmartenson)

The city could be down to a little more than 600 officers by February, which would be 200 fewer than in 2008. Even with another 40 expected to graduate from Police Academy, they will be rookies and there is already talk of trying to contract with outside agencies for support.

Ritholtz: 'Dot Com Bonus Envy' Stymies Wall St. Reform (Arthur Robey)

"The fix is very simple," says Ritholtz, "repeal the Commodities Futures Modernization Act and suddenly this becomes like every other financial instrument."

The Transparent Supply Chain (westcoastjan)

The compassionate consumer considers the full effects of buying something, including the values and practices of the company from which items are purchased, the social impact of items being bought, and who benefits when items are obtained from a particular business.

Germany's growth forecast cut by Bundesbank (westcoastjan)

Southern European countries, such as Spain and Italy, have been in recession for more than a year, but the malaise has spread to the rest of the single currency zone via weak export demand and falling consumer and business confidence.

North Korea in financial trouble after blowing $100 million on tributes to dead leader Kim Jong-il (westcoastjan)

North Korea faces various economic sanctions and widespread waste, and the country has struggled to support itself financially in recent years. Despite this, the regime has been demanding “donations” from citizens to continue funding Kim Jong-il’s cult of personality, the Chosun Ilbo reports, and is reportedly seeking emergency loans with 20-40% interest from European and Russian lenders.

How Amazon built a US$2-billion cash pile out of reach of U.S. tax authorities (westcoastjan)

Amazon’s Luxembourg arrangements have deprived European governments of hundreds of millions of dollars in tax that it might otherwise have owed, as reported in European newspapers. But a Reuters examination of accounts filed by 25 Amazon units in six countries shows how they also allowed the company to avoid paying more tax in the United States, where the company is based.

Energy

The First Shift: Ford’s hybrid fuel-economy claims questioned (westcoastjan)

Consumer Reports questions new Ford Fusion and C-Max hybrid’s 47 mpg boasts “Your mileage may vary” has always been the caveat emptor of estimated fuel economy boasts. Especially with the current batch of new cars that get some electrical help, air temperature, driving conditions and driver style are critical to real-world fuel-economy. So it’s no surprise that U.S.-based Consumer Reports didn’t achieve the new 2013 Ford Fusion and C-Max Hybrid’s 47 miles-per-U.S.-gallon city/highway fuel economy claims (about 5.0 L/100 km). What is surprising is how much less efficient the two new Ford gas-electric hybrids were than claimed to be.

Scientists Find Mega-Oil Field ... 1,300 Light Years Away (James S.)

Now like me you might be wondering how oil, which is supposedly produced from organic matter buried millions of years ago, could possibly exist in space. Well it turns out that these hydrocarbons were likely created by the fragmentation of giant carbonaceous molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are produced during the death of a star.

There is even a theory that molecules such as these could have served as the first organic compounds for creating life.

Smart Grids, Stupid People (James S.)

John McDonald, director of GE Digital Energy’s Technical Strategy and Policy Development, told AOL Energy that if US utilities in the east had installed this smart technology earlier, they would have known about outages more quickly and been able to respond more rapidly.

GE, of course, is another leader in smart grid technology.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@peakprosperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

5 Comments

littlefeatfan's picture
littlefeatfan
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
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Posts: 141
More 3E related Links, Resources and Cartoons

This weeks summary posted at http://3es.weebly.com/ Going Underground Edition

Please give a thumbs up on this post if you find these additional links useful

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Tall's picture
Tall
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Joined: Feb 18 2010
Posts: 242
World's Big Trees Are Dying

The researchers liken the global loss of big trees to the tragedy that has already befallen the world's largest mammals, such as elephants, rhinos, tigers and whales, cautioning that almost nowhere do conservation programs have the time-frames lasting centuries, which are needed to assure the survival of old trees.

"Just as large-bodied animals such as elephants, tigers and cetaceans have declined drastically in many parts of the world, a growing body of evidence suggests that large old trees could be equally imperilled," they warn.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121206162519.htm

Doug's picture
Doug
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Joined: Oct 1 2008
Posts: 2715
Tall wrote:The researchers

Tall wrote:
The researchers liken the global loss of big trees to the tragedy that has already befallen the world's largest mammals, such as elephants, rhinos, tigers and whales, cautioning that almost nowhere do conservation programs have the time-frames lasting centuries, which are needed to assure the survival of old trees. "Just as large-bodied animals such as elephants, tigers and cetaceans have declined drastically in many parts of the world, a growing body of evidence suggests that large old trees could be equally imperilled," they warn. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121206162519.htm

Thanks for posting this Tall.  It hits me where I live.  I've been wandering the forests of the northeast most of my adult life and have become painfully aware of the disappearances of many species and the large specimens of others that are still around.  My daughter is currently doing research on the beech blight that is destroying the larger examples of this magnificent species.  There are some dead rotting trunks still near my home, but no living large examples. 

Of course chestnut trees that once dominated eastern forests providing livings for many of our ancestors, including Native Americans, are largely absent from our forests except for an occasional tree that has come up from roots, but will die before it comes close to maturity.

My woods still have a lot of American Elm trees, but they are all young and will be killed off when another wave of the Dutch Elm disease sweeps through.

I also have a number of white ash trees, some fairly mature, that are destined to die from either the "yellowing disease" or the emerald ash borer that has been found throughout our region but fortunately hasn't made it to my property yet.

Black cherries and black walnuts rarely grow to full maturity because of the value of their timber.  One of my daughter's professors is the forest keeper for a stretch owned by the college.  He is retiring and has left one particularly outstanding black cherry tree as a legacy to his successor that will fund a lot of research when it is harvested.  Is that good or bad?  Too often, such things are mixed blessings.

Doug

Arthur Robey's picture
Arthur Robey
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2010
Posts: 2074
Our good friend.

 It will look different in different places. Some countries are already collapsing, and some people won't even notice. There are almost a billion people who are starving to death these days, and people here basically aren't noticing.

Denis Meadows. Der spiegel.

Did anyone else pick up that the interviewer, Marcus Becker, was trying to invalidate Prof Measow's findings? Even now, as a billion people are starving to death.

My understanding is that we are in the middle of the main event right now. Evolution winows out the most vulnerable first.  It is not by accident that I am in this far-away corner of the world.  The fire rages elsewhere. We choose not to look. This is God's work. Death is a bridge we all have to cross. Death is not evil, suffering is.

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