Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 9/7 - Natural Gas Wars, Links With China Bring 'Long-Term Pain'

Friday, September 7, 2012, 10:35 AM

Economy

The 8th Largest Economy In The World Is Being Overwhelmed By A Tsunami Of Debt (David B.)

Even though Italy has implemented a vast array of austerity measures, the debt of the Italian government continues to explode.

Why Elites Will Always Try To Protect Their Wealth (westcoastjan)

This is not, as you might think, a book bashing today's "one per cent," the group that the Occupy movement has fingered as the bogeymen of an increasingly unequal age. But perhaps it could be.

One in three shops have shut in Thessaloniki (Alan W.)

Popular streets such as Aghias Sofias (photo) have seen a succession of closures, at a rate, on this particular stretch, of 34.2 percent, according to data released on Thursday by the National Confederation of Greek Commerce (ESEE).

VA won't cover costs of service dogs assigned for PTSD treatment (VeganD)

Trainers say that for veterans suffering mental disabilities such as PTSD or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), dogs can be trained to help avert panic attacks and wake them up as they enter a nightmare. The animals can be taught to remind veterans to take medications and alert them if they have left a burner lit on the stove.

Links with China bring 'long-term pain': study (westcoastjan)

"Those short-term gains very often create long-term pain in such a terrible way that I [have seen] the suffering of those people [who] were raking in new opportunities and then all of a sudden they dry out," Josephine Smart, economic anthropology professor at the University of Calgary and author of the report, said in an interview.

Flood of Pacific oil exports leaves West Coast refinery thirsty for crude (westcoastjan)

It’s those tankers that are, in many ways, responsible for the problems Chevron is having. The refinery’s scramble for oil is perhaps the single best indication of the tremendous shift under way in the oil patch, as oil companies rapidly move to seize new export markets that pay higher prices for crude.

Natural Gas Wars: A Look at Gazprom's Underhand Tactics (James S.)

Competitors include Russia’s number two, Novatek, and Norway—the second largest natural gas exporter in the world. So, in April, Gazprom had to lower its European sales guidance for 2012. Its market share in Europe was 27% last year, and it’s shooting for 30% by 2020, but if the US shale-gas boom ever infects Europe, those plans would become a pipedream—and if the high-profit sales from Europe tapered off further, it would have to raise prices at home, a political nightmare. Hence its fight by hook or crook against shale gas in France.

For Farms in the West, Oil Wells Are Thirsty Rivals (Sonya P.)

That thirst is helping to drive an explosion of oil production here, but it is also complicating the long and emotional struggle over who drinks and who does not in the arid and fast-growing West. Farmers and environmental activists say they are worried that deep-pocketed energy companies will have purchase on increasingly scarce water supplies as they drill deep new wells that use the technique of hydraulic fracturing.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@peakprosperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

6 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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SailAway's picture
SailAway
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Breakthrough in Solar Energy Conversion

Stanford engineers have discovered a process called photon enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate electricity, and could offer over double the efficiency of existing solar cell technology. The process could reduce the costs of solar energy production enough for it to compete with oil

http://video.techbriefs.com/video/PETE-A-New-Solar-Energy-Convers;Semiconductors-ICs

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cmartenson
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SailAway wrote: Stanford

SailAway wrote:

Stanford engineers have discovered a process called photon enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate electricity, and could offer over double the efficiency of existing solar cell technology. The process could reduce the costs of solar energy production enough for it to compete with oil

http://video.techbriefs.com/video/PETE-A-New-Solar-Energy-Convers;Semiconductors-ICs

What an odd statement/comparison..."enough for it to compete with oil"

Compete for electricity production?  We don't use oil for electricity production.  Well, maybe Saudi Arabia does, but they're the crazy exception besides a few island states/nations without other options (yet).

Will these solar cells compete with oil for the produciton of lubircants, plastics and perhaps 500,000 other petroleum derived products?  

Instead I think they should have compared the potential of PETE against coal (for starters) and natural gas.

As always, there are lots and lots of exciting things being discovered in laboratories and tested on lab benches here, there and everywhere.  The real key is what can produced at scale, at what costs, using common materials, and over what time period.

littlefeatfan's picture
littlefeatfan
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More 3E related Links, Resources and Cartoons

http://3es.weebly.com/  Welcome to the Machine Edition

Also don't miss this great list of resources http://www.doingitourselves.org/links

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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chm's picture
chm
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Posts: 46
Jobless Greeks Clean Toilets in Sweden for Work

http://zen-haven.dk/jobless-greeks-clean-toilets-in-sweden-for-work/

As a pharmaceutical salesman in Greece for 17 years, Tilemachos Karachalios wore a suit, drove a company car and had an expense account. He now mops schools in Sweden, forced from his home by Greece’s economic crisis.

“It was a very good job,” said Karachalios, 40, of his former life. “Now I clean Swedish s—.”

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