Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 6/19: 40 Years Of UK Energy Consumption, Breadline Britain, Why Our Food Is Making Us Fat

Tuesday, June 19, 2012, 10:45 AM
  • Why Economics Is Bunk
  • We've never had it so bad: how Breadline Britain has been hit
  • What Is Money?
  • Apache Corp Make the World's Largest Shale Gas Discovery in British Columbia
  • 40 years of energy consumption in the UK: where do we get our power from?
  • BP global energy statistics: the world's oil production, reserves and energy consumption
  • Why Our Food Is Making Us Fat

Economy

Why Economics Is Bunk (ScubaRoo)

Newsnight Economics Editor Paul Mason interviews the controversial economist Steve Keen before an audience at the LSE. Keen was one of the few who predicted the 2008 crash.

We've never had it so bad: how Breadline Britain has been hit (ScubaRoo)

How tough are times right now? Britain is now a country where unemployment is inching up and six unemployed people chase every job. Meanwhile, the ONS reports recently that 10.7 million people in the UK were defined as being at risk of poverty in 2010, with the highest risk level among those over the age of 65.

What Is Money? (ScubaRoo)

Is the value of money determined by anything more than our willingess to believe in it? Frances Stonor Saunders tries to understand the fundamentals.

Apache Corp Make the World's Largest Shale Gas Discovery in British Columbia (OPA)

For consumers natural gas has just become a very reliable source of fuel at historically low prices. For those thinking about natural gas vehicles and other uses of natural gas, the potential for long-term supplies at good prices has improved dramatically. In the meantime there will be economic growth, jobs and new products and services to distribute and use all this gas. North America’s luck has just turned.

40 years of energy consumption in the UK: where do we get our power from? (ScubaRoo)

Sustainable energy experts Evo Energy and designers Epiphany have created a series of interactive graphics illustrating the changing face of energy consumption in the UK since 1970. The top panel breaks down the primary energy sources used to produce energy consumed in the UK. Beneath that are the same figures but for processed energy, i.e including electricity generated from primary sources. Three further graphics show consumption by sector, total UK consumption and changes in energy intensity. Follow the instructions on the visualisations to explore interactive content.

BP global energy statistics: the world's oil production, reserves and energy consumption (ScubaRoo)

BP have published the June 2012 edition of their Statistical Review of World Energy. Use the interactive visualisation below - created by Craig Bloodworth at the Information Lab - to explore key statistics by country, year and energy source. Select from the three tabs along the top of the graphic to browse different categories. Clicking on a country in any of the individual panels will highlight it in corresponding charts and bring up a statistical summary.

Why Our Food Is Making Us Fat (ScubaRoo)

Why are we so fat? We have not become greedier as a race. We are not, contrary to popular wisdom, less active – a 12-year study, which began in 2000 at Plymouth hospital, measured children's physical activity and found it the same as 50 years ago. But something has changed: and that something is very simple. It's the food we eat. More specifically, the sheer amount of sugar in that food, sugar we're often unaware of.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@chrismartenson.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

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