Farmland LP

A Weekend On The Farm

An excellent investment of time (and money)
Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 9:55 AM
If you've been a reader of for more than a few months, you've likely heard us talk about Farmland LP. It's a fund that purchases over-farmed, depleted conventional farmland (at a discounted price), and then spends years nursing the land back to organic status using sustainable farming methods.
As an investor, I have the opportunity to tour any of the fund's 5 farm properties, which are located in southern Oregon and central California. So that just what I did this past weekend when the Farmland team held its first annual investor gathering at its newest (and largest) property in Stockton, CA.
What Should I Do?

Barley Fodder Feed Mat

Reflections on Using a DIY Fodder System

Lessons learned from home-grown fodder
Monday, April 8, 2013, 6:30 PM

Growing fodder for animal feed is starting to catch on, and many homesteading families and small farm operations are exploring the possibilities of what this type of feed can do for the health of their animals and cost of feeding them.  If you haven’t yet read the first two articles on growing fodder and building a simple DIY fodder system, you can find them here: and here:

It has been a few months since I wrote the DIY fodder system article for Peak Prosperity.  It turns out that a lot of people are interested in growing their own fodder, as this article has been extremely popular.  With the combination of all of the valuable feedback (thank you!) and a few more months of experience, we have some additional thoughts to share. » Read more

What Should I Do?

5 Uses for Livestock Panels

More than just fencing, a flexible building material.
Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 6:13 PM

Livestock panels are a heavy gauge galvanized welded wire fencing material.  They are also commonly called "cattle","hog", or “sheep” panels.  They are almost a must have on any new farm or homestead.  They make the acquisition of livestock a much easier process and are an affordable option for smaller spaces. 

Their rigidness and ability to take abuse makes them idea for goats, pigs and other animals that have a tendency to stand on or lean against your fencing.   » Read more