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Charles Hugh Smith: Fixing The Way We Work

Closing the wealth gap with meaningful work
Sunday, November 15, 2015, 1:34 PM

Charles Hugh Smith returns to the podcast this week to discuss the theme of his new book A Radically Beneficial World: Automation, Technology and Creating Jobs for All.

Automation and artificial intelligence are changing the landscape of work. Tens of millions of jobs are on track to be eliminated over the next decade or so by these advancing technological innovations in the US alone.

The way in which our current economy is constructed, the fruits of those cost savings are likely to go into a very small number of private pockets, while the millions of displaced workers will find themselves with no income and no work to do. It's a huge looming problem that is not being address in national dialog right now.

But there's opportunity to course-correct here. To use our new technologies to increase total productivity in a way that empowers rather than diminishes the individual worker. » Read more



2014 Year in Review

The year we piled up risks like a global game of Tetris
Friday, December 19, 2014, 11:27 AM

I have not seen a year in which so many risks—some truly existential—piled up so quickly. Each risk has its own, often unknown, probability of morphing into a destructive force. Groping for a metaphor—I love metaphors and similes—I feel like we’re in the final throes of a geopolitical Game of Tetris as financial and political authorities race to place the pieces correctly. But the acceleration is palpable. The proximate trigger for pain and ultimately a collapse can be small, as anyone who’s ever stepped barefoot on a Lego knows. » Read more


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The Trouble with Numbers

Our 'good' data worsens the closer we look
Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 11:06 AM

According to the ever-strident popular press, the world is in recovery. The stock market says so, the bond market says so, and the politicians and monetary bureaucrats all say so.

The only trouble is the central banks continue to flood the world with liquidity, something they shouldn't need to be doing if a true recovery were really upon us. » Read more



Steen Jakobsen: Expect A 30% Stock Market Correction in 2014

Presaging economic lows in Q1/Q2 2015
Sunday, June 1, 2014, 4:25 PM

This week, Chris talks with Steen Jakobsen, Chief Investment Officer of Saxo Bank. We wanted to see through the eyes of a professional economist, which Steen kindly allowed us to do.

Steen agrees that central banks have largely failed in their misguided attempts to boost growth via trickle-down programs. Pretty much all the benefits of the recent years of money printing have gone to the upper echelons, with the true engines of growth and jobs -- small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) -- getting very little.

As a result, financial asset prices have been driven up too high, which Steen anticipates will correct at some point in 2014; likely by 30% or so. » Read more



The Rise of New Models of Community

Why they're emerging & what they need to succeed
Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 11:14 AM

In my previous series on the erosion of community, I surveyed a number of conventional explanations for this decades-long trend and discussed 10 other potential factors in the decline of social capital. I concluded that economic need would likely be the driver of a resurgence of community—a need that will only become apparent when the Central State and the debt-based, consumerist-corporate system are no longer able to fulfill their implicit promises of welfare, subsidies, endless credit and secure jobs. In this next installment on community, we look at the possibility that new models are arising beneath the mainstream media’s master narratives that Everything’s fine and The Status Quo is both good and eternal. » Read more



How Life Will Change

Logistics and values in the post-industrial future
Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 4:16 AM

Executive Summary

  • In a future defined by diminished economy, due to depleting resources, what can we expect?
  • A return to "old-style" cultural norms looks inevitable for:
    • Spirituality
    • Trust & Reputation
    • Values & Virtues
    • Leadership & Order
    • Education
    • Commerce
    • Jobs & Work

If you have not yet read Are You Crazy To Continue Believing In Collapse? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

The journey to where we’re going, the transition to the next economy and the society that comes with it, is liable to be harsh and disruptive. Network breakdown will be the order of the day. Money and goods will stop moving. People will lose a lot. They’ll lose property, imagined wealth, comfortable routines, faith in institutions and authorities. In some places they may lose personal security or freedom. Depending on how disorderly politics gets, we may lose family, loved ones, and friends. People will be very unsure of who or what they can depend on. We might expect pervasive desperation, anger, and despair.

One thing I fully expect is... » Read more


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You've Got No Job!

A glimpse into the future of (un)employment
Friday, February 7, 2014, 1:45 AM

Today, the pundits are a-buzz making sense of the latest lackluster jobs report. Expect much hand-wringing over the impact of the 'polar vortex' and that Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow.

But most of us care more about the state of one particular job: our own. How relevant is this latest bit of data to that? Not very.

So, to better understand the trends in the work environment most likely impact our own paychecks, it will help to look at another bellwether similar to our fuzzy groundhog friend: AOL. » Read more



A Fed Insider Comes Clean

And validates our worst suspicions
Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 12:02 AM

After they behaved badly and almost ruined the entire world financial system while pocketing fat fees along the reckless road they laid down, the big banks got 'made whole' by the Federal Reserve.

While couched at the time in fancy acronyms, a lot of complexity, and some good old motherhood and apple pie (that is, the Fed talked about helping the economy recover and people get their jobs back), the truth of the matter is simply that the Fed cared only about helping the big banks repair their balance sheets. » Read more


Skypixel |

Why We All Lose If the Fed Wins

Fighting the wrong battles
Monday, August 19, 2013, 6:20 PM

If we hold the view that humans are behaving unsustainably in terms of any of the 'three Es'  the economy, energy, or the environment  then any rapid resumption of a paradigm of exponential growth in our consumption of natural resources or in our growth of debt over income simply takes us more quickly to the bitter end of this story. » Read more

Daily Digest

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Daily Digest 7/10 - IMF Cuts Growth Forecast For World Economies, Canadians Struggle With Saving

Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 9:21 AM
  • Illinois lawmakers seek more information in hunt for fix to $97 billion pension crisis
  • IMF cuts growth forecast for U.S., world economies
  • Nurses' strike hits Portugal hospitals
  • Seniors find it harder to get home-delivered meals (Florida)
  • Chicago gun violence: 74 people shot, 12 killed over July 4 weekend
  • Job cuts: Mining companies to trim operations by 3,500 (Ghana)
  • Financial Crisis Just a Symptom of Detroit’s Woes
  • Furloughs Have Begun for Nearly 50,000 Full-Time Guardsmen Nationwide, Including Guam
  • Mining services industry forced to adapt to end of coal boom in Queensland's Bowen Basin
  • USDA: One In Six Americans Use Food Stamps
  • Puerto Rico sees surge in homeless population
  • Tuition at 14 Pennsylvania universities to rise 3 percent
  • Eurozone jobless rate worse than OECD average
  • Canadians struggle with retirement saving
  • Italy's rating lowered one notch to BBB: S&P
  • Gold borrowing cost hits post-Lehman high
  • Study: State's pension debt spiked since February (California)