Daily Digest

Daily Digest 6/7 - The Big Reset, Hard Debt Choices Ahead, How To Feed A Healthy Family

Thursday, June 7, 2012, 10:32 AM
  • The Big Reset: Don't Get Left Behind
  • 21 Signs That Global Financial Markets Could Be In For A Long Summer
  • Want a Healthy, Well Fed Family? Here’s How to Start
  • Sacha Baron Cohen's "The Dictator" delivers Inspired Satire on American Democracy
  • CBO: Hard Choices Ahead On Debt
  • Fed Intervention and the Market: New Update
  • How to Ensure U.S. Wind Power Succeeds without Subsidies

Crash Course DVDOwn the Crash Course Special Edition Set with Presenter’s Pack (NTSC or PAL)

Economy

The Big Reset: Don't Get Left Behind (Chris M.)

Raoul is a Goldman Sachs alum that went on to co-manage one of the world’s largest hedge funds in London. He now writes research for senior money managers at the Global Macro Investor from his (early) retirement home on the coast of Spain. In short, he’s an insider’s insider.

The presentation is very straight forward, incisive, and very dark. It makes a clear case why the current version of our global financial system will collapse and what the results of this collapse will be.

21 Signs That Global Financial Markets Could Be In For A Long Summer (David B.)

#8 New orders for factory goods in the United States have declined three times in the last four months. That is a sign that the “economic recovery” in the U.S. has clearly stalled.

Want a Healthy, Well Fed Family? Here’s How to Start (Chris M.)

With enough rich soil available to grow on, you can feed your entire family for the decade or more a financial/economic crisis takes to play out (or as the climate change worsens).

Think of it as a rainy day fund or emergency bank account.

Sacha Baron Cohen's "The Dictator" delivers Inspired Satire on American Democracy (Jaime)

"Why are you guys so anti-dictators? Imagine if America was a dictatorship. You could let 1 percent of the people have all the nation's wealth. You could help your rich friends get richer by cutting their taxes and bailing them out when they gamble and lose. You could ignore the needs of the poor for health care and education. Your media would appear free, but would secretly be controlled by one person and his family. You could wiretap phones. You could torture foreign prisoners. You could have rigged elections. You could lie about why you go to war. You could fill your prisons with one particular racial group and no one would complain. You could use the media to scare the people into supporting policies that are against their interests."

CBO: Hard Choices Ahead On Debt (Jeff B.)

Under that scenario over the long run, debt falls to 53% of the size of the economy by 2037 from more than 70% today. Tax revenue would rise to 24% of GDP in 25 years and keep growing. That would be well above the 18.3% historical average.

Simultaneously, spending in vast portions of the federal budget would shrink dramatically. Other than Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security and interest, spending would fall to the lowest percentage of GDP since before World War II.

Fed Intervention and the Market: New Update (Phil H.)

If a picture is worth a thousand words, this chart needs little additional explanation — except perhaps for those who are puzzled by the Jackson Hole callout. The reference is to Chairman Bernanke's speech at the Fed's 2010 annual symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Bernanke strongly hinted about the forthcoming Federal Reserve intervention that was subsequently initiated in November of 2010, namely, the second round of quantitative easing, aka QE2.

Energy

How to Ensure U.S. Wind Power Succeeds without Subsidies (OPA)

Optimal policies, we found, would be designed to drive cost declines and performance improvements in zero-carbon energy technologies like wind turbines and solar panels. While deployment has gone up and costs down for wind power and other clean energy markets in recent years, these advances have not been enough to counter the bust expected after key subsidies expire. The looming PTC expiration is a matter of chief concern this week at WindPower 2012, the industry's annual development and exposition conference.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@PeakProsperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

7 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 2472
woomera's picture
woomera
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 8 2008
Posts: 44
"Bob" Robert Chapman has passed away

G'Day,
I just visited Bob Chapman's website:
http://theinternationalforecaster.com/
It seems like he has passed away. Anyone who knows of his writing will note his intelligence,
Wit and humor.  I don't know if he invented the word "Sheeple", but after reading that word and being from Oz, I was simply captivated by his essays.
We can only appreciate his wonderful life, as well as the short time we have on this earth.
Regards,
Woomera

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 30 2009
Posts: 2472
Bill Hicks's picture
Bill Hicks
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Posts: 34
New "Reality" Show Treats Evictions As Entertainment

billhicksisdead.blogspot.com/2012/06/new-reality-show-treats-evictions-as.html

The story:

A U.S. cable channel best known for featuring mixed martial arts fighting and video games is preparing to launch a show based upon another, decidedly less visible American contact sport: evictions.
 
“World’s Worst Tenants” will feature crazy-but-true stories, as recounted and apparently acted out by professional evictor Todd Howard and his team of… other evictors. Just don’t call them thugs.

And my reaction:

So what next? Maybe we can send a camera crew into mental hospitals and film the patients having psychotic episodes and seizures. Won't that be great for a f***ing laugh?

mobius's picture
mobius
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: May 18 2009
Posts: 150
AT Bill:

The story:

A U.S. cable channel best known for featuring mixed martial arts fighting and video games is preparing to launch a show based upon another, decidedly less visible American contact sport: evictions.   “World’s Worst Tenants” will feature crazy-but-true stories, as recounted and apparently acted out by professional evictor Todd Howard and his team of… other evictors. Just don’t call them thugs.

And my reaction:

So what next? Maybe we can send a camera crew into mental hospitals and film the patients having psychotic episodes and seizures. Won't that be great for a f***ing laugh?

The bar has already sunk in Holland.  A program filmed, a la Candid Camera, in the Emergency ward an Academic Hospital in Amsterdam.  Patients were not warned or given an opportunity to give permission.  The show has been canned after 2 episodes and an "inquiry" is under way. 

Are we (royal we as in society) so desperate for finding "margin" on any product/service/show that the bottom line ethical questions aren't even being asked?

thc0655's picture
thc0655
Status: Gold Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 27 2010
Posts: 473
mobius wrote: The story: A

mobius wrote:

The story:

A U.S. cable channel best known for featuring mixed martial arts fighting and video games is preparing to launch a show based upon another, decidedly less visible American contact sport: evictions.   “World’s Worst Tenants” will feature crazy-but-true stories, as recounted and apparently acted out by professional evictor Todd Howard and his team of… other evictors. Just don’t call them thugs.

And my reaction:

So what next? Maybe we can send a camera crew into mental hospitals and film the patients having psychotic episodes and seizures. Won't that be great for a f***ing laugh?

The bar has already sunk in Holland.  A program filmed, a la Candid Camera, in the Emergency ward an Academic Hospital in Amsterdam.  Patients were not warned or given an opportunity to give permission.  The show has been canned after 2 episodes and an "inquiry" is under way. 

Are we (royal we as in society) so desperate for finding "margin" on any product/service/show that the bottom line ethical questions aren't even being asked?

And my reaction:

YES.

Up and down the social spectrum this IS where we're going, what we're doing.  Jon Corzine at MF Global illegally takes customer funds and assets calculating only that if he wins, he wins and if he loses, he'll get away scot free and set up shop somewhere else.  On the other end of the spectrum, one heartless soul steals a plastic container of change off the counter at 7-Eleven meant to benefit a poor accident victim without health insurance.  Another thug robs an old man who doesn't resist of his wallet at gunpoint, and then shoots him anyway just for fun.  

Our moral decay is why we can't deal with the Economy, Energy and the Environment, and is by far the tougher nut to crack.

rlmrdl's picture
rlmrdl
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: May 5 2008
Posts: 5
The end of the amrgin

mobius wrote:

Are we (royal we as in society) so desperate for finding "margin" on any product/service/show that the bottom line ethical questions aren't even being asked?

This is the key question and, of course the answer is yes. And the fact is that we are running out of margin.

My epiphany on the rapidly approaching failure of the western model came in about 2000 when i was checking out my groceries at Coles supermarket in Earlwood, Sydney. There on the checkout band was an order separator which had, until then, sinply been blank or had the company's name on it. Instead I saw an advert for TV Guide and I could suddenly hear the triumphant voice of some Marketing Whizz claiming that his company now "owned" the 'checkout band order separator space'.

At that moment I realised that the system was in such trouble that no space, however small and trivial, could afford not to be covered in exhortations to buy. We were at the limit of the consumer society and, like all peaks, it must precede the end.

On that day I began, for a few years, to recite to myself as I shopped, that I should remember what it was like to be able to walk around the market, putting in my trolley whatever I liked and to have a huge selection of brands, sizes and types of any product. I should remember because, within a reasonable expectation of my lifetime (I was 50) it would all come to an end. I stopped doing that when it became obvious that I was right, by then I was too busy getting my house and now my land in order, paying off all my debt, moving into cash and, now, buying hard goods such as tools, seeds, fertilisers, glues, screws, lubricants and sealants.

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