Daily Digest

Daily Digest 2/23 - Bailout Illusion For Europe, Japan To Invest In Floating Wind Farms, Tokyo 'As Contaminated As Chernobyl'

Thursday, February 23, 2012, 11:46 AM
  • Obama Offers to Cut Corporate Tax Rate to 28%
  • Infographic On The Greatest Gun Salesman In America: President Obama
  • For Greece, a Bailout; for Europe, Perhaps Just an Illusion
  • Marie Colvin's killing piles pressure on Assad as civilian death toll rises
  • New York Judge Rules Town Can Ban Gas Hydrofracking
  • Japan Starts to Invest in Tsunami-Proof, Floating Wind Farms
  • Market Deja Vu? The Price of Gasoline Begins To Surge Out Of Control Again
  • How Closely are Oil Prices Tied to Economic Activity?
  • Tokyo is as contaminated as the worst place in Chernobyl

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Economy

Obama Offers to Cut Corporate Tax Rate to 28% (jdargis)

With the framework for changes that the Treasury secretary, Timothy F. Geithner, will outline on Wednesday, Mr. Obama will enter an election-year debate with Republicans in Congress and in the presidential race who seek even lower taxes for businesses. But an overhaul of the corporate code is unlikely this year, given that political backdrop and the complexity of an undertaking that would generate a lobbying frenzy as businesses vie to defend old tax breaks or win new ones.

Infographic On The Greatest Gun Salesman In America: President Obama (art)

Ironically, the perceived hostility towards gun owners by President Obama has actually helped the firearms industry tremendously. Since the 2008 election, more Americans than ever before are purchasing firearms & ammunition. This has meant massive increases in sales by firearm & ammunition makers, billions more in federal and state tax collections related to guns & ammo, increased membership in the NRA, and hundreds of thousands of new Americans carrying concealed handguns. Therefore, should the firearms industry support President Obama for a second term or not?

For Greece, a Bailout; for Europe, Perhaps Just an Illusion (jdargis)

Throughout the crisis, the European Union’s favored strategy has been to provide tightly controlled financial support to highly indebted countries, in the hope of buying them enough time to put in place policies aimed at cutting budget deficits. While such moves can deepen recessions, the goal is to eventually lower debt levels and win back the confidence of the bond markets.

Marie Colvin's killing piles pressure on Assad as civilian death toll rises (jdargis)

Their deaths came on a day in which, according to activists, more than 80 people were killed in the besieged district of Baba Amr in Homs, which has been under daily attack by the Syrian army for three weeks.

The French president, Nicolas Sarkozy, called the journalists' deaths an assassination and said the Assad era had to end.

Energy

New York Judge Rules Town Can Ban Gas Hydrofracking (jdargis)

“The communities targeted for drilling need the power to determine for themselves when, where and if fracking is permitted,” Katherine Nadeau, the water and natural resources program director for Environmental Advocates of New York, said in a statement. She said the ruling would energize “the dozens, if not hundreds, of cities and towns concerned with industrial gas drilling.”

Japan Starts to Invest in Tsunami-Proof, Floating Wind Farms (James S.)

The floating Kamisu wind farm just off the coast of the Ibaraki prefecture comprises of just seven 2 megawatt wind turbines, but was able to withstand the tsunami and provided vital electricity in the wake of the disaster.

Market Deja Vu? The Price of Gasoline Begins To Surge Out Of Control Again (David B.)

The price of gas is going even higher even though energy consumption is sharply declining in the United States. Just check out the charts in this article by Charles Hugh Smith. Americans are using less gasoline and less energy and yet the price of gas continues to go up.

That is not a good sign.

How Closely are Oil Prices Tied to Economic Activity? (James S.)

It is no surprise that import bills go up when oil prices increase. It is more surprising that GDP often goes up too. Figure 1 depicts the correlation between oil prices and GDP for 144 countries from 1970 to 2010. More precisely, it shows the cyclical components of oil prices and GDP, with long-term trends excluded. The set includes 19 oil-exporting countries, represented by red bars, and 125 oil-importing countries, represented by blue bars. A positive correlation indicates that when oil prices go up, GDP goes up, and when oil prices go down, GDP goes down.

Environment

Tokyo is as contaminated as the worst place in Chernobyl (Mr. Fri)

The contamination level of Mizumoto Park turned out to be the same level of “off-limits zone” in Chernobyl. The contamination level of the park was 23,300 Bq/Kg. According to Nuclear Safety Commission, it is converted to be 1.4 ~1.5 million Bq/m2.

In Chernobyl, if the area is more contaminated than 1.48 million Bq/m2, it was labeled as off-limits zone, which was the worst level of the pollution. Because cesium doesn’t choose Mizumoto park intentionally, at least some parts are contaminated as the worst area of Chernobyl.

Article suggestions for the Daily Digest can be sent to dd@PeakProsperity.com. All suggestions are filtered by the Daily Digest team and preference is given to those that are in alignment with the message of the Crash Course and the "3 Es."

84 Comments

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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Doug's picture
Doug
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guns

More drum pounding by the gun industry.  Fact is, gun laws have been loosening up for the past couple decades.  But, if the industry and its mouthpiece, Wayne Lapierre, can throw a scare into the sheeple, they'll buy...buy...buy.

saxplayer00o1's picture
saxplayer00o1
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IMF: Iran oil halt could result in 30% price hike

IMF: Iran oil halt could result in 30% price hike

Ken C's picture
Ken C
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Loose Gun laws is it?

Doug wrote:

More drum pounding by the gun industry.  Fact is, gun laws have been loosening up for the past couple decades.  But, if the industry and its mouthpiece, Wayne Lapierre, can throw a scare into the sheeple, they'll buy...buy...buy.

Well Doug you need to look at the totality of gun laws over the past couple decades. This includes Federal, State and Local levels. Indeed some progress has been made at the Federal level at returning to our constitutional roots but at the state and local level I can tell you  that we have more restrictions than before.

I use to be able to:

buy magazines with more than 10 rounds

buy more than one gun a month

not have to check the list of "approved" handguns before I go to buy

be able to buy a gun from a friend without the state taking part in the transaction

buy a "black rifle" that I can only see pictures of now.

and many more.

Without the NRA and Wayne LaPierre we would be much worse off than today.

Ken

P.S. I have been trying to get a concealed carry permit for decades in Los Angeles - no can do. So how lax is that again?

Doug's picture
Doug
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Quote:P.S. I have been

Quote:
P.S. I have been trying to get a concealed carry permit for decades in Los Angeles - no can do. So how lax is that again?

I've got two, one for NY and another for PA.  That means I can legally carry a concealed gun from here to Nevada legally, but not CA, OR or WA.  Go figure.

Doug

heffe's picture
heffe
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Best option with gun laws

Ken C wrote:

Well Doug you need to look at the totality of gun laws over the past couple decades. This includes Federal, State and Local levels. Indeed some progress has been made at the Federal level at returning to our constitutional roots but at the state and local level I can tell you  that we have more restrictions than before.

I use to be able to:

buy magazines with more than 10 rounds

buy more than one gun a month

not have to check the list of "approved" handguns before I go to buy

be able to buy a gun from a friend without the state taking part in the transaction

buy a "black rifle" that I can only see pictures of now.

and many more.

Without the NRA and Wayne LaPierre we would be much worse off than today. 

P.S. I have been trying to get a concealed carry permit for decades in Los Angeles - no can do. So how lax is that again?

It is interesting how emotional attachments are able to override rational thought. From my experience, gun owners are typically very whiny, scared little chickens, afraid and seeking invalid security through concealed weapons.

One option you have, is to take the barrel of a loaded gun, [removed], and [removed]. This way you don't have to worry about all the BS accompanying contemporary society and the worldviews associated. It would also reduce consumption, as well as, remove one more mindless blob of meat from perpetuating ignorance and illogical paradigms.

The idea of gun ownership is backwards.  The best route towards achieving that security you long for, is to help create a better society, where no one has any incentive to harm or rob you. This means; learning what monetary market economies demand, produce, and how alternative economic systems can equalize demand and supply relationships in a sustainable fashion. Monetary markets systems produce scarcity, and hence, players within the monetary market game have incentives to harm each other, when in reality, collaboration would produce far better results.

Probably best if you ignore what I've said, assume your beliefs are absolute and valid, and continue your failing attempts at reducing anxiety and insecurities.

El Jefe de Loco

[Moderator's note: This post is a gross violation of our community's forum guidelines.  Characterizing large groups of individuals using emotionally charged language is bad.  Suggesting that they end their own lives is beyond the pale.  Appropriate corrective action has been undertaken with the user.]

doorwarrior's picture
doorwarrior
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doug:More drum

doug:

More drum pounding by the gun industry.  Fact is, gun laws have been loosening up for the past couple decades.  But, if the industry and its mouthpiece, Wayne Lapierre, can throw a scare into the sheeple, they'll buy...buy...buy.

I am comforted by the fact that law abiding citizens are excersing their constitutional and god given rights to protect themselves from enimies both foeign and domestic. Its not the laws that have been "loosening up" I am concerned with, nor does this mean the trend will continue. Its the laws and treaties that TPTB want to put in place that scare the heck out of me. The more gun owners we have the more difficult it will be to pass more "common sense" gun  laws( everything you can do to harm someone with a gun is already illegal) or to get a UN small arms treaty approved.

Whos to say its only Obama views that is causing the increase in gun sales, gun sales were increasing during the Bush era also. While I am sure Obama's views do contribute some I think more and more people are waking up to the fact the the social/economic/political environment in this country and the world is comming to a boiling point and its better to be prepared and resilient. No matter the reason, the more guns in the hands of the public the better.

"An armed society is a polite society. Manners are good when one may have to back up his acts with his life"             Robert A Heinlein

Rich

doorwarrior's picture
doorwarrior
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heffe: It is interesting how

heffe:

It is interesting how emotional attachments are able to override rational thought. From my experience, gun owners are typically very whiny, scared little chickens, afraid and seeking invalid security through concealed weapons.

How limited your experience must be. You truly have no idea what your talking about.

The idea of gun ownership is backwards.  The best route towards achieving that security you long for, is to help create a better society, where no one has any incentive to harm or rob you. This means; learning what monetary market economies demand, produce, and how alternative economic systems can equalize demand and supply relationships in a sustainable fashion. Monetary markets systems produce scarcity, and hence, players within the monetary market game have incentives to harm each other, when in reality, collaboration would produce far better results.

I do agree with creating a better society but we are a LONG way off from any type of society where we will not need to defend ourselves. I need to live and protect my family in todays world, not just work to make a better tomorrow.

Rich

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Fear of guns

Jefe,

I used to be like you. I used to be afraid of guns and the people who believe in the right to carry them, and I also thought that if we just took care of people "better," loved them better, then they would behave...better. It is a weird sort of magical thinking, as what it really comes down to is the belief that "if I just be a good person and love everyone well, then nothing bad will happen... or at least probably not to me." It feels much safer to think this way (which is why people do it) than to go down that fearful road, the rabbit hole where you begin to realize there is no such thing as security, not really, ever. It usually ends when reality personally interferes in your life.

I have to tell you however, as someone who now owns guns, carries concealed, and loves to target shoot, that every single person I know who hated guns and feared them, coverted the moment they actually tried shooting one. The minute they learn how to hold it, load it, and shoot it, how to take it apart and clean it, etc, they begin to reassess how they really feel about the whole thing. Every single person I have introduced to guns actually thinks it's fun to target shoot.

After awhile they begin the process of understanding that it is mostly just a tool - as deadly as a knife, a car, or as poison, but nevertheless a tool that can be used for either good or evil. Guns become far less scary for them, and then when they consider keeping a gun themselves, the issue also becomes far more complicated than they realized previously. It is anything but black and white. Suddenly they begin to ask themselves questions they never dared to before, such as "would I be able to shoot someone who attacked me in my home?" (often the answer is "I am not sure") and then when it occurs to them later on, "would I be albe to shoot someone who was about to kill/rape my child/wife?" (often the answer is immediately "Yes.") 

Jefe, your post shows me so clearly that you don't like to think about criminal attacks, or about "bad things" happening, either to you or someone you love. I understand that, it is a difficult thing to think about. The real difference between us though, is that I am willing to face it realistically and you prefer to visit the inside of your head and dream instead. And you very likely have never been seriously attacked yourself. The point is,most people who own guns legally have thought a lot more about it than you realize. Just as in the freedom of reproductive choice, I believe we must allow people to make their own decisions about their lives and respect that they are intelligent enough to do it responsibly. We already have laws for those people who decide to hurt others.

You said,

"The best route towards achieving that security you long for, is to help create a better society, where no one has any incentive to harm or rob you."

Whether that is the "best" route is highly debatable. I feel it is an unrealistic one at present, and leaving me without a way to defend myself is not an answer. Especially as a whiny, scared-little-chicken woman, I find that your reply and your prescriptions for societal peace demonstrate a deep denial of my reality and that of others who are physically weaker (or even just situationally vulnerable to attack.) You exhibit a profound ignorance of human nature, and in addition, an underlying willingness to let those like me pay the price in the meantime.

It comes down to this, Jefe: I will never give up my right or ability to defend myself from attack simply to assuage the irrational fears of people like you. Nor should you even ask me to.

(For some excellent articles about gun ownership - everything from how-tos to examining one's beliefs about the right to defend yourself, go to http://corneredcat.com.)

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Heffffe!

I'm ashamed of you.

I'm proud of those who have answered your uncivility with civil answers. 

In my opinion, due to your attitude, you are not worth a retort to your childish comments. If you can't partake in cerebral commentary, please take your ball and go play elsewhere, this is not the place for you.

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
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Great point....

shudock wrote:

After awhile they begin the process of understanding that it is mostly just a tool - as deadly as a knife, a car, or as poison, but nevertheless a tool that can be used for either good or evil. Guns become far less scary for them, and then when they consider keeping a gun themselves, the issue also becomes far more complicated than they realized previously. It is anything but black and white. Suddenly they begin to ask themselves questions they never dared to before, such as "would I be able to shoot someone who attacked me in my home?" (often the answer is "I am not sure") and then when it occurs to them later on, "would I be albe to shoot someone who was about to kill/rape my child/wife?" (often the answer is immediately "Yes.") 

Slightly off-topic, but shudock makes a great point in this paragraph.  The gun is the tool, the weapon is the mind and intent of the person using it.

Take away the gun and the person simply finds another tool.  Or does heffe propose building a "better society" by forcibly engineering the minds and human nature of those living in the "better" society?

Besides, heffe has repeatedly demonstrated the inability to function civilly in our "society" here at CM.com.  Why should we listen to calls to seek or change to his society?  There's a bit of a credibility gap there that just can't be bridged.

No thanks....I'm with shudock. 

And given that you now "own guns" (plural, how awesome), "carries concealed" AND "loves to target shoot" - I seriously doubt you are a "whiny, scared-little-chicken woman"

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Poet
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Off Your Meds, Heffe?

Heffe

I hope you were just off your meds today. Because what you said was inexcusable.

What you've proven with your disgusting, insulting words is that responsible, law-abiding gun owners are much more civil and honorable and decent to others who do not agree with them, than someone such as yourself who would profess to be working for a better world that purportedly would have no need for guns.

I expect a full apology and acceptance of fault on your part, and a promise not to do it again. Otherwise, I propose that we all put you on Ignore with no further need to entertain your thoughts in our heads with our limited and valuable time.

Poet

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Those who own guns....

Poet wrote:

I expect a full apology and acceptance of fault on your part, and a promise not to do it again. Otherwise, I propose that we all put you on Ignore with no further need to entertain your thoughts in our heads with our limited and valuable time.

I'm kinda surprised he wasn't on most everyone's ignore list long ago. 

Does he ever post without being abusive?

Moderator wrote:

User's posting privileges have been suspended.

Look's like we won't have too worry for at least a little while.....

I'm also with Shuddock and Dogs and just pretty darn happy that those that believe in liberty and personal responsibility are often those that own guns.  I would have little hope if it were the other way around.

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Interesting

Well,

Tokyo is almost, if not "as bad" as Chernobyl - Greeks are about to Defalt - gas prices are ever higher and demand keeps slipping - and yet - the only passionate debate that goes on for a page and a half..... Is about guns?

Oh My!

...... I am speechless! And that's quite an accomplishment for me.

... Now where did I put that box of hollow points? Seriously, ummm... Nope, sorry I got nuttin' 

C.

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shudock
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Dogs, I think it's all on

Dogs, I think it's all on topic, and thanks. We are all a little whiny and scared inside sometimes I suppose, haha. It's quite a human thing, you know? It is only people like Jefe who are ashamed and afraid of their feelings.

Even carrying a loaded weapon is no guarantee that a person will prevail, or not get hurt.

That being said, no, generally I am not so scared and I really try not to whine. I am a helluva lot more confident in my ability to protect me-and-mine now than I used to be. The confidence of having practiced the skills and having the option actually makes me less of a target for crime to begin with, as most criminals like to choose weak targets who aren't paying attention. It also helps me see potentially dangerous situations in a more clear-eyed, relaxed light.

Guns/shooting have helped me learn to hunt/gut/butcher deer as well, which makes me greatly appreciate where my food comes from. I have practiced target shooting quite a lot now, and I have that to thank for saving my garden last spring from a very voracous woodchuck. (I am damned proud of that shot, she dropped like a stone and never felt a thing. And woodchucks are notoriously shy and difficult to sneak up on.) There is a good reason farmers traditionally have the shotgun parked over the doorway of the farmhouse - it is a necessary tool when you want to build and survive off of a homestead.

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RNCarl, yes

I grieve for those living in Japan in contaninated areas. Tokyo is a city fo almost 13 million souls: that's more than fifity percent more than the population of New York City. That so many people are at risk boggles the mind.

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Ken C
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CCW

Doug wrote:

Quote:
P.S. I have been trying to get a concealed carry permit for decades in Los Angeles - no can do. So how lax is that again?

I've got two, one for NY and another for PA.  That means I can legally carry a concealed gun from here to Nevada legally, but not CA, OR or WA.  Go figure.

Doug

Yep, and I have Utrah and Florida permits so I can carry in about 39 states but NOT where I live. Sure makes sense to me. - NOT-

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For your consideration....

shudock wrote:

That being said, no, generally I am not so scared and I really try not to whine. I am a helluva lot more confident in my ability to protect me-and-mine now than I used to be. The confidence of having practiced the skills and having the option actually makes me less of a target for crime to begin with, as most criminals like to choose weak targets who aren't paying attention. It also helps me see potentially dangerous situations in a more clear-eyed, relaxed light.

shudock -

Not sure where you are from but suggest you take a look at the program these guys have put together.  I've studied martial arts for almost 22 years and can't recommend these guys strongly enough.  An adequate discussion could be its own thread - I'll probably draft  post for the Definitive Tactics thread to open up the discussion.

http://www.targetfocustraining.com/

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I'm proud of y'all

I just want to say that I am proud of the responses to heffe which were posted after his indiscretion. The level of intellectual maturity is imperssive. Several disagreed with him but did not stoop to his level of abuse. This is truly an informative and highly intellectual site. It was right and proper for the moderator to suspend his privileges. Please keep up the good comments on the issues. I learn a lot from you all. Thanks

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Ken C It only took me just a few words of your post...

Dear Ken C,

It only took me just a few words of your post to figure out you are in California.  ;-) My husband and I talk with gun buyers from California all day long, and yes everybody who calls from California is always very appreciative that we help them navigate all the rules and regs and restrictions and stay on the legal side of the law when making their purchases.

They tell me why they are purchasing their firearms, and so I have insight into folks' reasons for buying whatever guns they choose. Therefore, I think articles like the one cited are a little bit interesting, but not usually very "on target" analytically, because citing statistics like the number of NICS checks - and then trying to extrapolate consumer motivations from the stats - just gives more insight into the mind of the journalist than the actual folks who are making the purchases. (Oh my gawd why are They are buying So Many Guns ack!)

For example, in 2008, all of us dealers nationwide had a big sale year, for us it was our biggest ever, and many customers expressed concern about Obama's gun policies at that time. However, buyers actually expressed more often that they were (and still are) concerned about personal issues, such as getting older and becoming more vulnerable, wanting to protect themselves in case of home invasion and wanting to protect their families.

Additionally - actually - just as many folks are into hunting and shooting sports and do not express any fears at all when making their purchase.

I think that gun sale statistics based on the number of NICS checks (AKA Federal Background Checks) are a too-generalized indicator, because a NICS check is done whether the firearm is of new manufacture or used and resold. (At http://PersonalSecurityZone.com sell only new firearms, so I have no in-the-trenches idea of the used market.)

Currently, customers have not been mentioning any displeasure with any particular politician as a motivation for buying a gun... I hear no mention of this hardly at all. I think it's interesting but there is another motivation for most of our buyers these days...

Currently, a huge "happening" is that many Californians are now buying their first Modern Sporting Rifle (as in AR15 type rifle). We have many sales to Californians as they "catch up" with the rest of the country in their quest get (what I as a former competitive target shooter) just like to call "a really good rifle" with ergonomics, accuracy, accessorization capability and well of course with a bullet button and 10-rounders to make it California legal.

http://personalsecurityzone.com/California_Legal_AR15_and_AK_Rifles.htm

Mary Kay at http://PersonalSecurityZone.com

shudock's picture
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"When facing violence on the

"When facing violence on the street today, the only thing guaranteed to get you out alive is injuring your assailant."

I don't know, Dogs. I don't have anywhere near your experience with martial arts, but I have to admit to being a little skeptical of programs that guarantee success in such a fluid situation as personal violent attack. It is simply a fact that criminals always DO choose the time and place of the attack, and the targets/victims do not. And even if I do injure an assailant, whether by gun or by hand, there is still never a guarantee of safety or escape. (I guess even great programs have to compete for customers, and sales pitches help in that regard.)

Like most people, I'm just an ordinary person whose days are concerned with chores and errands, and will likely never have a physical advantage over an attacker. Most women are forced to accept this lack of advantage from the day we are born, or at least once the boys start getting bigger than us, so speaking in terms of guaranteed success just doesn't ring true for me. Generally, I believe my best initial strategy is to keep my wits about me, pay attention to what is happening, and then if I have to, do whatever I can to fight back without reservation, get away, and maybe do damage in the process. The damage done to the assailant is not my goal, or my first priority. Getting away from him is. It is why I like the philosophy at the Cornered Cat website so much. The first and best thing to do is to see the trouble coming before it even happens, but then mentally commit to fighting like hell if backed into a corner. A sort of mental martial art, I suppose.

But this is not to say that I don't believe in training. And I would never say that martial arts self-defense training is useless or ineffective. Quite the opposite, the more a person knows how to fight, the better, always. As I'm sure you already know, women in particular benefit from learning their own strength and parameters, especially if they get real sparring practice. (I did spend a year once, training with Kajukenbo and I found the sparring to be intensely FUN.) Most of us women don't even know what it feels like to full-on punch a bag, much less another human being. We often don't know our own strength. It is an invaluable thing to learn, and not least because of what a person can learn about themselves. But even beyond that, I think the best thing about martial arts is that it gets us practicing that commitment to tactics and reactions instead of freezing up.

That program you recommend looks great, and a lot better than most self-defense courses. My Kajukenbo instructors included a big streetfighting component in their training too - learning "dirty" take-downs that were surprisingly effective. It was a long time ago though, and I always wanted to learn more. Maybe I will try the Target Focus thing. I live in northern new england though - it looks like NYC would be the closest, and that's at least 5 hrs away from me.

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locksmithuk
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Heffe and guns

Heffe

Theorising about guns and their use is all well and good in the world of fluffy-wuffy, but it does not detract from 2 things:

1. Humans are still primitive beasts at our core - don't be fooled that we aren't, just because Dr Phil and a million self-help books try to tell us otherwise. Reduce us to a state where we're deprived of our comforts, starving, scared and threatened, and you'll never see a faster regression to primal behaviour anywhere else;

2. An experience of being robbed at gunpoint will redefine your will to defend yourself and your sense of self preservation. My peace-loving mother was carjacked by 5 armed thugs, who shoved a pistol in her face and took off with her possessions. She now carries a weapon and will use it without hesitation. Her theorising has vanished, because she now understands the language & currency of the lowest common denominator.

ao's picture
ao
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yes indeed

locksmithuk wrote:

She now carries a weapon and will use it without hesitation. Her theorising has vanished, because she now understands the language & currency of the lowest common denominator.

This statement about sums it up. 

Rector's picture
Rector
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Posts: 348
Idealism is a form of ignorance that is self correcting

This type of wishful thinking will get you killed. The world is populated by the full spectrum of people, many of which do not share your desire for a better society. The idea that a large group of people will ever achieve a state in which "no one has any incentive to harm or rob you" is malignantly naive and ignores common sense observations about human nature.

You will not make it if you do not abandon your willful blindness. I would hate to hear that the first thug who you meet, declines to accept your view, and provides due penalty for the error.

Good luck

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guardia
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Re: RNCarl, yes

safewrite wrote:

I grieve for those living in Japan in contaninated areas. Tokyo is a city fo almost 13 million souls: that's more than fifity percent more than the population of New York City. That so many people are at risk boggles the mind.

We have to put that in perspective though. The cancer rate is (was) about 1%, so even if that doubles, 100% increase, which did not happen in Kiev when accounting for all cancer types, for example, it's still only 2% of the population. Besides, not everyone (read: practically no one) in Japan purposefully acquires products from the general area of Fukushima, like the government wants us to do... And we should also be worried about other types of pollution. It ain't getting better, radioactive or not.

Samuel

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Target Focus Training

shudock wrote:

"When facing violence on the street today, the only thing guaranteed to get you out alive is injuring your assailant."

I don't know, Dogs. I don't have anywhere near your experience with martial arts, but I have to admit to being a little skeptical of programs that guarantee success in such a fluid situation as personal violent attack. It is simply a fact that criminals always DO choose the time and place of the attack, and the targets/victims do not. And even if I do injure an assailant, whether by gun or by hand, there is still never a guarantee of safety or escape. (I guess even great programs have to compete for customers, and sales pitches help in that regard.)

Like most people, I'm just an ordinary person whose days are concerned with chores and errands, and will likely never have a physical advantage over an attacker. Most women are forced to accept this lack of advantage from the day we are born, or at least once the boys start getting bigger than us, so speaking in terms of guaranteed success just doesn't ring true for me. Generally, I believe my best initial strategy is to keep my wits about me, pay attention to what is happening, and then if I have to, do whatever I can to fight back without reservation, get away, and maybe do damage in the process. The damage done to the assailant is not my goal, or my first priority. Getting away from him is. It is why I like the philosophy at the Cornered Cat website so much. The first and best thing to do is to see the trouble coming before it even happens, but then mentally commit to fighting like hell if backed into a corner. A sort of mental martial art, I suppose.

But this is not to say that I don't believe in training. And I would never say that martial arts self-defense training is useless or ineffective. Quite the opposite, the more a person knows how to fight, the better, always. As I'm sure you already know, women in particular benefit from learning their own strength and parameters, especially if they get real sparring practice. (I did spend a year once, training with Kajukenbo and I found the sparring to be intensely FUN.) Most of us women don't even know what it feels like to full-on punch a bag, much less another human being. We often don't know our own strength. It is an invaluable thing to learn, and not least because of what a person can learn about themselves. But even beyond that, I think the best thing about martial arts is that it gets us practicing that commitment to tactics and reactions instead of freezing up.

That program you recommend looks great, and a lot better than most self-defense courses. My Kajukenbo instructors included a big streetfighting component in their training too - learning "dirty" take-downs that were surprisingly effective. It was a long time ago though, and I always wanted to learn more. Maybe I will try the Target Focus thing. I live in northern new england though - it looks like NYC would be the closest, and that's at least 5 hrs away from me.

shudock -

Truth be told, I dragged my feet on going to TFT training because of my background.  When I went to the 18 hour introductory seminar, I had to force myself to open my mind and not have past experience cloud the learning experience.

The instructors are fantastic - and not for the faint of heart.  Some of the other students had their kids with them, the youngest was about 16 or 17.  The discussion was frank and matter of fact.  Within 5 minutes of starting I knew the instructors were serious, experienced, thoroughly knowledgeable and the manner of instruction - while shocking to some because of a bit of colorful language - was superb.

The session opened with a discussion of the three types of encounters people will find themselves in:

1. Social:  Think Applebees or the local sports bar with your friends.  You and friend have a spirited argument over your favorite baseball team with some name calling and insults (good natured or otherwise).  This situation will almost never result in physical violence.

2. Anti-Social: Same scenario as the above, but as you get up to go to the bathroom, you accidentally bump the arm of someone at the bar and he spills his beer.  His (or her) immediate response is "Hey you dumba!$, watch what your doing, you spilled my beer."  Because he has been drinking and is in front of his friends, he feels the need to puff out his chest and act Billy Badass.  These situations occasionally progress to physical violence, but even if it is a pushing and shoving match, or maybe even a few thrown punches, the antagonist is still functioning within social constraints and isn't trying to really hurt you.  Most of the time, this scenario, while certainly anti-social doesn't result in physical violence and serious injury  You can usually defuse these situations with a simple "Whoa, hey man, I'm so sorry.  My bad, totally my fault, let me buy you another beer."

In these two scenarios, even though there is a degree of confrontation, you can almost always defuse the situation and prevent escalation to physical violence without physical action - by simply doing nothing.

And then there is the third scenario and this is where the TFT course of instruction is focused on.  They really don't care about preparing you for either of the above scenarios because the vast majority of society already knows how to function there.  The chance of real physical injury from the above two scenarios is remote.

Where the TFT course of instruction is focused is as follows.....

3. Asocial:  Same setting except what you don't notice is the guy at the end of the bar.  He's a sociopath - a serial rapist and for whatever reason, he has decided that you are going to be his next victim. So he waits.  What you don't know is that he was sitting in the parking lot when you drove up. He watched where you parked. When you went into the sports bar, he parked his van right next to your car.  And he is going to wait until you leave, follow you to your car and try to punch you in the back of the head, throw you into the back of his van and drive off.

This guy is bent on doing you harm and you will not escape this situation through inaction. You are the prey and there is a predator.

This situation is what TFT trains you for.  They first address the mental element of the three encounter types, emphasize the differences and focus on instructing you in techniques that will give you a functional tool kit to at least face the third type of encounter.  You Tube is full of surveillance clips of people being violently attacked and instead of fighting back, you can hear them screaming "Stop, stop, why is this happening to me?  What are you doing, stop, stop!!"  There are numerous accounts of victims being found dead with a firearm with a full magazine.  Why?  Because they couldn't shift their brain into the area where it neede to be to function in and deal with the asocial encounter.  They were mentally and therefore physically constrained by the rules of a polite society, while never recognizing that their attacker was not.

The second mental element that comes up over and over again throughout the course of instruction is identifying what the weapon is in the encounter.   This is where TFT departs from classic martial arts styles or standard self defense training.  The weapon is NOT the gun, club, knife, baton, etc.  The real weapon in these encounters is the mind and the intent of the attacker.  You have to shut off the weapon.

That is where TFT goes off on its own and the simplicity of the instruction is astounding.  In order to shut down the weapon - the attacker's brain - you have to flood it and overwhelm it with sensory input.  YOU MUST CAUSE INJURY.  You have to produce so much sensory input that the attackers motherboard shuts down and you get the blue screen of death.  When an attacker's brain is no longer functioning, he cannot attack you.  Period.

The physical application of TFT techniques do not involve intricate hand, arm, body, leg movements that you see in katas and forms of classic martial arts styles.  The focus is on where to strike different parts of the human body to cause injury and elicit a desired response.  The beauty is that most people already know where and what these targets are.  The eyes, the trachea, the xiphoid process/sternum, groin (for men and women), joint breaks, bone breaks are all targets.  Google the illegal moves in Mixed Martial Arts or UFC competition - for the most part these are the target areas in TFT.  With a few exceptions, what you can't do in an MMA bout is what you want to do in an asocial encounter.

If you drive your thumb two knuckles deep into an attacker's eye, they will stop.  The pain is excruciating in the damaged eye.  You get a sympathetic response from the other eye.  I know there are a few doctors that contribute here regularly that can elaborate on the specifics of the physiological response to having someone bury their thumb into your eyeball. 

If you punch or strike an attacker's neck with the blade of your forearm, it is relatively easy to trigger the vasovagal response that in many cases will render them unconscious - at the very least it will stun them enough to where you can either get away or move to a new target area. 

If you foot stomp the top of someone's foot and break the bones, you start increasing the sensory input to the brain in the form of sensed pain.  If enough pain is sensed and accumulated, the attacker's focus shifts from you to his pain.

A focused and directed strike to the xiphoid process removes air from an attacker's lungs - without air, the brain shuts down.  The body doesn't negotiate this - it responds.

A strike to the clavicle of 5 pounds or more will break it.  You cannot raise your arm with a broken clavicle.

If you strike and rupture the spleen, liver or kidneys, you will cause internal bleeding that takes blood flow from the brain.  Without blood flow to the brain, the brain begins to shut down.  Your attacker stops attacking.  Untreated he may die. Some of these techniques and strikes are lethal - hold that thought for a few paragraphs.

If you grab a handful of an attacker's junk, (or kick, knee, punch) you will trigger a pain response that will add to the sensory input flood.  Note - a groin strike is just as effective on women as it is men as far as triggering a painful sensory input signal.

TFT also teaches to look for an accumulation of injuries.  A kick to the groin will result in an attacker reflexively pulling his hips back rapidly.  This pulls the shoulders over the hips and the upper body drops.  This opens up several new target areas.  The eyes, trachea and neck (vasovagal) are in play now.  A strike that damages the trachea will result in swelling that left untreated can be lethal.  Plucking an eyeball out of someone's head will stop just about every encounter.

Eventually, you and/or the attacker will end up on the ground.  You are taught what target areas to look for from every conceivable position you may find yourself in - nothing like hyperextending a knee with your foot as your attacker steps over you after knocking you to the ground.  All you need is a momentary loss of focus on your attacker's part to look for another target area.

Some of the strikes are potentially lethal if untreated.  Some will result in permanent damage.  You may have to answer for that later.  What would someone do to save the lives of their loved ones.  What would you be able to do to a serial rapist attacking your 10 year old daughter or son?  The old axiom of "It's better to be judged by 12 than carried by 6" comes to mind.

To wrap up, the strength of TFT is both in the mental training and the physical.  For me, with my background in martial arts, I didn't learn any new target areas.  But I did learn a new way to look at them.  What I was not "allowed" to do in Muay Thai kickboxing is what I would look to do in an asocial encounter - but the technique of the kick, elbow strike or punch would be identical to that used in a competitive bout - and the target area on the body would be different.  Where I would look for a submissive joint lock in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and a tap out by my opponent, in an asocial encounter I would look to snap the wrist, elbow or shoulder like a rotten branch.  Competitive martial arts forms like Muay Thai and BJJ are still contrained by a rule set and potentially anti-social behavior, but at the end of the match, win or lose, you get up and shake your opponent's hand.

TFT isn't training you for the social or anti-social encounter.  It is training you for the scenario where you have to do something violently physical or something violently physical (or worse) is going to be visited on you.  TFT trains you to instantly recognize and shift to being able to operate in the asocial enviroment where you dictate that the prey becomes the predator.

I would recommend it to everyone who has the opportunity to take it.  My wife, son, daughter and future son-in-law are all going to take the course.  Hopefully they will never have to use it - but they will at least have a tool kit of mental training, strike techniques and physical applications to go to if needed.

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions.

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Whatta bunch a whiners

[Moderator's note: removed]

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Unreal

A guy you know wrote:

LOL!!!

My, my, the whiners at the CM forums are upset, insulted, and complaining, go figure!!!

Yes you are all completely right aren't you?? I must be completely wrong because obviously the older generations are smart with the fact they supported this retard economic system their whole life.

I understand, I am someone half your age and twice as smart, you must have feelings of insecurity plaguing your mind. I'd feel pretty stupid if I was 40 years old and had supported this beyond retarded economic system your whole life.

Oh well, deny my right to free speech why dont you, because that will obviously make you feel better about your ignorant selves.

Oh and be sure to buy more guns because that will definitely bring security, joy, and wonderment to your lives. Oh and BTW, I own a gun too, I just love reading your reactions. Indicative of emotional attachement, insecurity, inferiority complex, as well as, ignorance. If someone wants to rob me, I will fight like a man with my own hands, and if I die, oh well. Thats what a man does, fights with his hands, carrying a concealed gun demonstrates your chicken shit ways.

A guy you know

You are a wonderful spokesman for the movement to the future community and society you are trying to develop.  We thank you for your continued valuable contribution and community building efforts here.

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My guess about A Guy is

My guess about A Guy You Know is that his aggressive, childish mouth will eventually be his demise. Unless of course his anonymity allows his alter-ego some freedom whereas in person he is a quiet sheep silently hoping to be dinner. In any event, I wish him a happier tomorrow full of enlightened peace.

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Well Said, DIAP

Well said, Dogs In A Pile.

I really think Heffe's off the deep end now. Someone who is working towards a future society that won't require guns, tells others they don't need a gun, yet himself owns a gun... and is willing to fight to the death? I think cognitive dissonance has caught up with him.

Poet

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

You are a wonderful spokesman for the movement to the future community and society you are trying to develop.  We thank you for your continued valuable contribution and community building efforts here.

A guy you know wrote:

LOL!!!

My, my, the whiners at the CM forums are upset, insulted, and complaining, go figure!!!

Yes you are all completely right aren't you?? I must be completely wrong because obviously the older generations are smart with the fact they supported this retard economic system their whole life.

I understand, I am someone half your age and twice as smart, you must have feelings of insecurity plaguing your mind. I'd feel pretty stupid if I was 40 years old and had supported this beyond retarded economic system your whole life.

Oh well, deny my right to free speech why dont you, because that will obviously make you feel better about your ignorant selves.

Oh and be sure to buy more guns because that will definitely bring security, joy, and wonderment to your lives. Oh and BTW, I own a gun too, I just love reading your reactions. Indicative of emotional attachement, insecurity, inferiority complex, as well as, ignorance. If someone wants to rob me, I will fight like a man with my own hands, and if I die, oh well. Thats what a man does, fights with his hands, carrying a concealed gun demonstrates your chicken shit ways.

A guy you know

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Guns

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

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Someday, guy we know, you

Someday, guy we know, you will look back on your comments and be profoundly embarrassed.

As long as the Internet stays up long enough, haha.

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Re: Guns

derekrawson wrote:

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

FYI, guns are illegal in Japan as well, but not completely sane people still exist and when they feel like killing someone, they simply pick up the closest kitchen knife and go on a rampage. So, sorry to say, laws won't help against all that fear.

Samuel

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derekrawsonCrikey, I could

derekrawson

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

It was my understaning that the Austrailan Gov. made all you aussies give up your guns. So I am not sure why you would be grateful to be living there. Having the ability to defend myself makes me feel very safe and and able to protect my family.  My whole family trains in Kajukenbo 3-4 days a week  along with weekly trips to the shooting range. We have chosen to make self defense a part of our lifestyle, not just something we do every once in a while, its something we live by. Martial arts (I include firearms in this) are not just about being able to defend yourself and hurt someone they are also about dexterity, self confidence, discipline, great cardio, comradery and much more.  Please do not assume that we train out of fear. That is far from the case.

 The great thing about the US is that the people still have the ability to make significant changes, no matter how bad things get. Do you?

Rich

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these are signs of mental illness

A guy you know wrote:

LOL!!!

My, my, the whiners at the CM forums are upset, insulted, and complaining, go figure!!!

Yes you are all completely right aren't you?? I must be completely wrong because obviously the older generations are smart with the fact they supported this retard economic system their whole life.

I understand, I am someone half your age and twice as smart, you must have feelings of insecurity plaguing your mind. I'd feel pretty stupid if I was 40 years old and had supported this beyond retarded economic system your whole life.

Oh well, deny my right to free speech why dont you, because that will obviously make you feel better about your ignorant selves.

Oh and be sure to buy more guns because that will definitely bring security, joy, and wonderment to your lives. Oh and BTW, I own a gun too, I just love reading your reactions. Indicative of emotional attachement, insecurity, inferiority complex, as well as, ignorance. If someone wants to rob me, I will fight like a man with my own hands, and if I die, oh well. Thats what a man does, fights with his hands, carrying a concealed gun demonstrates your chicken shit ways.

A guy you know

Delusions of intelligence when he acts like a petulant child.  Projecting his insecurities and shortcomings onto others.  A schizophrenic relationship with firearms.  This individual is mentally ill.  I feel sorry for him.  Actually, I'm wondering if additional steps should be taken.  If someone is this unbalanced and they are in possession of a firearm, they could be dangerous to others or themselves. 

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the heart and the fist

derekrawson wrote:

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

And I'm grateful to be living in America, the land that kept Australia free from Japanese occupation in WW2 when the Australians were unable to protect themselves.  Personally, I'd rather be able to protect myself than to count on someone else to do it for me.

Additional information on why "the heart and fist together are more powerful than either one alone" for your edification.

http://www.amazon.com/Heart-Fist-Education-Humanitarian-Making/dp/1452650969

 

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Point of order....

shudock wrote:

Someday, guy we know, you will look back on your comments and be profoundly embarrassed.

As long as the Internet stays up long enough, haha.

shudock -

That would be, "guy we knew"....

Carry on.

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bloodbath...?

ao wrote:

locksmithuk wrote:

She now carries a weapon and will use it without hesitation. Her theorising has vanished, because she now understands the language & currency of the lowest common denominator.

This statement about sums it up. 

One day soon, WTSHTF, Americans will just kill each other.

Many, not living in America, might let out a sigh of relief........  never ceases to amaze me how you lot love your guns so much.

Mike

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Crikey.........

ao wrote:

derekrawson wrote:

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

And I'm grateful to be living in America, the land that kept Australia free from Japanese occupation in WW2 when the Australians were unable to protect themselves.  Personally, I'd rather be able to protect myself than to count on someone else to do it for me.

It's one thing arming the army ao.........

Mike

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Mike...

While some may love guns... many who are prepping view them as just another necessity.  If you lived in the US, with all the guns already out there... some in the hands of bad guys.. are you saying you would not want to have one yourself.. .or maybe a few?  You would willingly sacrifice yourself, and your kids, to a bad guy, based on a belief?  Screw that... I don't like guns, and never wanted guns before I took the red pill... now I can't have enough ammo, bad enough guns, nor train enough.  We each have to adapt to the environment we face.  I wish I had the luxury of not feeling that guns are a necessity....  but I am sure glad myself and many of my neighbors are ready for whatever may come.      

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Damnthematrix wrote: ao

Damnthematrix wrote:

ao wrote:

locksmithuk wrote:

She now carries a weapon and will use it without hesitation. Her theorising has vanished, because she now understands the language & currency of the lowest common denominator.

This statement about sums it up. 

One day soon, WTSHTF, Americans will just kill each other.

Many, not living in America, might let out a sigh of relief........  never ceases to amaze me how you lot love your guns so much.

Mike

No Mike, you're wrong.  Some Americans may kill others but most won't just like some Australians may kill others but most won't.  These blanket statements about a people you just don't seem to understand are just plain wrong.  

You're mistaken about Americans loving their guns as well.  America loves its guns as much as it loves its highways and its sewage systems.  It's not a matter of love.  It's a matter of understanding and valuing the utilitarian nature of such tools.  While we may admire the craftsmanship of a firearm and respect its capabilities, what we really love is our liberty and we understand that liberty, both personal and national, can be lost in a heartbeat without a means of protecting it.

And as much as you think the world is going to come screeching to a halt, it won't.  Bad times will come and bad times will go and life will change but life will go on.

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Damnthematrix wrote: ao

Damnthematrix wrote:

ao wrote:

derekrawson wrote:

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

And I'm grateful to be living in America, the land that kept Australia free from Japanese occupation in WW2 when the Australians were unable to protect themselves.  Personally, I'd rather be able to protect myself than to count on someone else to do it for me.

It's one thing arming the army ao.........

Mike

Mike,

Why do you think the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution was written?

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ao wrote: Damnthematrix

ao wrote:

Damnthematrix wrote:

ao wrote:

derekrawson wrote:

Crikey, I could say so much on this but, in the interests of remaining a barely acceptable contributor here, I'll just say, OMG, I'm so grateful to be living in Australia. I'm amazed at the level of fear that has been exposed in the posts today. This so sad and very disturbing.

Good luck on your chosen path.

And I'm grateful to be living in America, the land that kept Australia free from Japanese occupation in WW2 when the Australians were unable to protect themselves.  Personally, I'd rather be able to protect myself than to count on someone else to do it for me.

It's one thing arming the army ao.........

Mike

Mike,

Why do you think the Second Amendment to the United States Constitution was written?

Mike doesn't understand that a gun is a simple tool and that the real weapon is the mind and intent of thewielder of the tool.

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Jim...

Jim H wrote:

If you lived in the US, with all the guns already out there... some in the hands of bad guys.. are you saying you would not want to have one yourself.. .or maybe a few? 

Precisely why I would never live in the US....

Mike

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fatal attraction

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

Mike doesn't understand that a gun is a simple tool and that the real weapon is the mind and intent of thewielder of the tool.

What makes you think that Dogs.....?  A gun just makes it soooo much easier to make a deadly and irreversible mistake.

Mike

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And a gun also makes it

And a gun also makes it soooo much easier to stop a deadly and irreversible crime from happening. So what is your point? Do you believe that those of us lawful gun owners cannot be trusted to know the difference? In that case why bother having laws at all? Just lock everyone up in padded rooms so nobody can make a "mistake." Do you think that you can have guarantees in life, where nobody makes any mistakes? Would you get rid of bathtubs because so many people make the mistake of slipping and falling? Do you want to be protected like a child is?

Again, you are missing the critical point. As Dogs said, the real weapon is the intention in the mind of the criminal, not whatever object he holds in his hand. You have made the classic mistake of thinking that laws prevent crime. They do not, they never have, and they never will. The very definition of crime is that it happens outside of the law. Do you not understand this?

There is nothing wrong with working toward a better society AND owning guns at the same time. And inanimate objects are not the problem. Poverty, inequality, sickness, hopelessness and a lack of love and care for each other are much bigger problems to focus our efforts on. Citizens owning guns has nothing to do with any of that.

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From Fried Green

From Fried Green Tomatoes:

Ed Couch: What the hell's this?
Evelyn Couch: That's a low cholesterol meal. Happy Valentine's.
Ed Couch: God! Are you trying to kill me?
Evelyn Couch: If I was gonna kill you, I'd use my hands.

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Damnthematrix

Damnthematrix wrote:

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

Mike doesn't understand that a gun is a simple tool and that the real weapon is the mind and intent of thewielder of the tool.

What makes you think that Dogs.....?  A gun just makes it soooo much easier to make a deadly and irreversible mistake.

Mike

What makes me think that? 

Statements like this:  "A gun just makes it soooo much easier to make a deadly and irreversible mistake."

What I don't understand is for as intelligent and objective as you are in so many areas - permaculture, "real" sustainable living, solar power generation - your ignorance regarding responsible gun ownership is astounding.

That you would continue to advertise that ignorance while brooking no discussion about responsible ownership and use of just another tool is puzzling.  It's almost as if you think you are right and all of us responsible gun owners are wrong.

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the mindless

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

Damnthematrix wrote:

Dogs_In_A_Pile wrote:

Mike doesn't understand that a gun is a simple tool and that the real weapon is the mind and intent of thewielder of the tool.

What makes you think that Dogs.....?  A gun just makes it soooo much easier to make a deadly and irreversible mistake.

Mike

What I don't understand is for as intelligent and objective as you are in so many areas - permaculture, "real" sustainable living, solar power generation - your ignorance regarding responsible gun ownership is astounding.

You see Dogs, it's the fact that by definition, 50% of the population has an IQ of 100 or less that worries me.  I don't doubt we have very smart gun owners in THIS community.....  but I would be very concerned about the fact that "the tool" might be in the hands of "the mindless"...  Those people who do not belong here, and refuse to even see what is obvious to us all...   Especially as WTSHTF, there will be loads of seriously angry and pissed off midless gun owners about..... people who will shoot first and ask questions later.  Now I can see that that may be a good reason to own a gun, but personally I'm far happier to be living in a country where I know no one who owns a gun (except my on-farm butcher).

In the US, the horse has bolted.  So many people own guns that you're forced to own one too, and I wouldn't live in your country for just that one reason alone.

The United States leads the world's richest nations in gun deaths -- murders, suicides, and accidental deaths due to guns - according to a study published April 17, 1998 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

The U.S. was first at 14.24 gun deaths per 100,000 people. Two other countries in the Americas came next. Brazil was second with 12.95, followed by Mexico with 12.69.

Japan had the lowest rate, at 0.05 gun deaths per 100,000 (1 per 2 million people). The police in Japan actively raid homes of those suspected of having weapons.

The 36 countries in the study were the richest in the World Bank's 1994 World Development Report, having the highest GNP per capita income.

The United States accounted for 45 percent of the 88,649 gun deaths reported in the study, the first comprehensive international scrutiny of gun-related deaths.

The gun-related deaths per 100,000 people in 1994 by country were as follows:

  • U.S.A. 14.24

<SNIP>

Australia 2.65

http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=6166

I rest my case......

Mike

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zuluander
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 29 2011
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The Danger of People Still Listening

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